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Resawing Question

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Forum topic by dalec posted 1385 days ago 1911 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dalec

613 posts in 2524 days


1385 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Question:

I resawed a spalted maple board hoping to get a book match that I could use for a table top. I may have messed up. I jointed one flat surface and adjoining edge before resawing. The original board was silightly over 1” thick. I resawed the board down to 1/2” as soon as I finished the cut, the board began to move. Now there is gap between the two sawn faces at one corner of nearly 1/2” (board 8” x 21”).

Anyway, now I have two boards 1/2” thick that have a beautify book match spalted pattern that is warped and thinking gluing a warped board to a plywood will likely fail. Would resawing again to 3/16” present less stress on a gluing? Or are there other fixes? I did check moisture content and it was down to about 12%.

Is there a better process for resawing this board in the first place?

Thanks,

Dalec


19 replies so far

View Eagle1's profile

Eagle1

2066 posts in 1700 days


#1 posted 1384 days ago

The only thing that I can think of. Did you let the boards aclamate to the room before you glued the up. I have read that it is best to do that when resawing. I hope this helps you out.

-- Tim, Missouri ....Inside every older person is a younger person wondering what the heck happened

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5561 posts in 2064 days


#2 posted 1384 days ago

Was your original plan to glue it down to a substrate? If so, re sawing them again would likely work.
If you use a good 3/4 plywood and use an apron under the table, as well as hardwood edging, I don’t think the 3/16 would warp the ply on a piece this small.
I’ve had success in wetting the concave portion and clamping it down until dry. This works if the reason for the warp is uneven drying. Probably less successful if it’s caused by internal stress due to the way the tree grew.
I’ve also bent wood using a hot water bath with fabric softener added. I just cap off a length of black plastic drain pipe, insert the wood, pour in the mixture until the pipe is nearly full and cap off the end and let it sit for a few hours. Of course, as soon as it comes out, it must be clamped to a form. Which, in your case, would be flat. I’d try this on the 1/2” before resorting to re sawing. At the worst, you’ll need to sand the raised grain.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1659 posts in 1558 days


#3 posted 1384 days ago

Allowing the wood to set overnight in your workshop helps a LOT with this problem. I resawed a 1×8 oak board that I had stored out in my shed and I cut it into 3 pieces before resawing it. The first two pieces cupped very badly as I cut it so I waited untill the next day to resaw the third section and what a difference! It worked out great. No cupping at all. I have learned my lesson on resawing.

-- In God We Trust

View alanealane's profile

alanealane

365 posts in 2526 days


#4 posted 1384 days ago

I’ve done resawing on small pieces for knife scales, and had them bow as soon as they were cut, even though the main block of wood was dry. After a few days, the bowed pieces were flat again after the unevenness in internal and external moisture came to equlibrium. I wonder if your pieces will do the same after a while. Try putting them on a flat surface under something heavy enough to just start bending them flat, or use a clamp. Wait a few days, and either check to see if the pieces will remain flat, or glue them to the substrate before they have a chance to bow again. I’ve never tried the following technique on wood more than 3/16” thick, but a product called Super Soft II veneer softener soaks into the piece and works to make a piece of thin wood supple enough to either be clamped to a curved form or flattened out. You can even glue the wood down while the softener is still in the wood.
This probably didn’t help you at all, but it’s my personal experience with resawing.

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2524 days


#5 posted 1384 days ago

First, thank you all for the suggestions.

The board moisture content was around 12%, which is within 1 or 2% of wood I have in my shop that is fully seasoned. Looked at the pieces this morning and one piece is relatively flat and the other piece pretty much useless at least for my original purposes, but there is some hope with that one flat piece.

I have thought most of yesterday about what went wrong and what I should have I would have done differently. I should been clearer on my approach with the board.

As it stands now, I think I can salvage that one board and resaw it down to a more appropriate thickness for veneers and glue to a good quality baltic or apple plywood substrate. Fortunately, the price I paid for that board was not a lot. I would hate the idea of messing up a nicely spalted board.

Dalec

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1810 days


#6 posted 1384 days ago

There’s some good information on this page that may give you some insight into what happened.

Good luck !

-- -- Neil

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5561 posts in 2064 days


#7 posted 1384 days ago

I hate to toss any wood I’ve worked. Why not try Lane’s or my suggestions? What have got to lose but time? You may be able to salvage it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2524 days


#8 posted 1384 days ago

Thanks Neil, Gene, Alanealane for the suggestions.

I was about to get going on the fix, but after hearing from all of you, I think, I will see if putting weight on the most warped pieces does anything. As I said earlier, there is some hope with that one piece that is reasonably flat.

Looks like I need to learn a lot more about resawing and wood movement.

Dalec

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1810 days


#9 posted 1384 days ago

Dale:

The farther I get into this hobby of mine, the more convinced I become that … I need to stop … and go back to Woodworking 101.

I’m frequently reminded that understanding things like grain direction and wood movement …. are absolutely critical. But they seemed dry and uninteresting to me, at first, so … I kind of skipped them.

And now I know I shouldn’t have. If you’re interested, I can grab a few titles, from my vast (LOL !) used woodworking book collection … of books that cover the subject well.

But … that sort of info is so readily found on the Internet, too.

Good luck !

-- -- Neil

View Eli's profile

Eli

141 posts in 1642 days


#10 posted 1384 days ago

Ideally, after the resaw, you are at twice your final thickness. For example, if you want two 1/2” boards, resaw them from 8/4 stock. I don’t really follow this with straight grained stuff. Figure often leads to warping, though. Also, some wood has internal stresses, aka anger.

Eli

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4318 posts in 1684 days


#11 posted 1384 days ago

A friend of mine in France after the last war somehow got oak beams from a cathedral built centuries before.
He ripped the beams and they twisted just like new wood.
Wood always moves and twists, not much we can do about it.

-- Bert

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2524 days


#12 posted 1384 days ago

Thanks Neil, Eli and Bert.

I guess what I experienced is part of the learning process.

Neil, like you those dry seemingly uninteresting topics suddenly become interesting when we bump up against a problem. Glad it wasn’t an expensive or difficult to find piece of wood, well it was very nice spalting. If you have a book title that you think may be helpful to me, I would welcome the title and author.

Dalec

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1810 days


#13 posted 1384 days ago

I thought Nick Engler’s treatment of the subject(s), in Joining Wood was pretty helpful.

And—using the above link—a used copy will set you back all of $3.74, with shipping ;-)

I think I saw a site, too, where the book was available for free, for download. Whether the site is legit, or charges a membership fee, though … I dunno ….

-- -- Neil

View Eli's profile

Eli

141 posts in 1642 days


#14 posted 1384 days ago

“Understanding Wood” by Bruce Hoadley

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2524 days


#15 posted 1383 days ago

Thanks Neil and Eli for the references.

Even with my short exposure to wood movement, it makes me appreciate the complexity of woodworking and the skill and knowledge of those woodworkers who do it well.

dc

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