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Sharpening Carbide

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Forum topic by richardchaos posted 05-13-2017 02:21 AM 2237 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardchaos

530 posts in 214 days


05-13-2017 02:21 AM

Does anyone know of any way to SHARPEN Carbide tips Table/Chop Saw blades.

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell


13 replies so far

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Loren

9612 posts in 3483 days


#1 posted 05-13-2017 02:30 AM

You’re better off sending them out, imo but
sharpening equipment is available.

https://www.harborfreight.com/120-volt-circular-saw-blade-sharpener-96687.html

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#2 posted 05-13-2017 02:35 AM

You can use a Dremel with cutting wheels. Use the sides of the wheels as a grinder.

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ArtMann

683 posts in 651 days


#3 posted 05-13-2017 02:35 AM

You need to buy a diamond hone. I use these from Highland Woodworking to touch up my good blades between sharpenings from a service. I also touch up router bits sometimes. There are many other choices for sale there and elsewhere.

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knotscott

7784 posts in 3210 days


#4 posted 05-13-2017 10:31 AM

I’d never attempt to sharpen a good blade myself, and lousy blades aren’t worth the effort. There is lots of potential to actually do more harm than good trying to sharpen yourself. If you’re careful you can hone the faces yourself. Otherwise, just keep them clean, and when the time comes, have them professionally sharpened for ~ $15.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Woodbum

798 posts in 2900 days


#5 posted 05-13-2017 11:29 AM

Send them to a pro sharpening service. In general, their pricing is cheap enough not to risk doing more harm than good on an expensive carbide blade. Kind of like trying to save a few bucks by removing your own appendix with a butter knife, using a six pack of Pabst for the anesthetic.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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richardchaos

530 posts in 214 days


#6 posted 05-13-2017 12:56 PM

Already there. watched a video on youtube last night


You need to buy a diamond hone. I use these from Highland Woodworking to touch up my good blades between sharpenings from a service. I also touch up router bits sometimes. There are many other choices for sale there and elsewhere.

- ArtMann

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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richardchaos

530 posts in 214 days


#7 posted 05-13-2017 12:57 PM

PABST! UGH!


Send them to a pro sharpening service. In general, their pricing is cheap enough not to risk doing more harm than good on an expensive carbide blade. Kind of like trying to save a few bucks by removing your own appendix with a butter knife, using a six pack of Pabst for the anesthetic.

- Woodbum


-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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Planeman40

1034 posts in 2596 days


#8 posted 05-13-2017 01:07 PM

Carbide can only be sharpened with diamonds. I agree that using a sharpening service is best, but if you must, do it with diamond sharpening disks and cups. Fortunately, these days these are not too exorbitant, but not cheap. Google that term and see what you find. Most of these are made in China so look to buying them direct from China. Google “buy direct from China” and you will find sites like Banggood and AliExpress. Also, you can sharpen by hand using a Dremel tool with diamond disks like these from Harbor Freight https://www.harborfreight.com/diamond-rotary-cutting-discs-5-pc-69657.html.
I sharpen my drills and router cutters using these disks.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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TheFridge

8288 posts in 1321 days


#9 posted 05-13-2017 01:51 PM

What’s wrong with Pabst…

I sharpened a 60t blade myself with a dremel diamond disc. It was an improvement. I setup a jig and everything. Then I found out carbide dust is horrible for you. Made me sick for a couple days. Since then I decided to pay 20$ and send it out.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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runswithscissors

2558 posts in 1860 days


#10 posted 05-15-2017 05:21 AM

The green grinding wheels work on carbide. I don’t know what the material is, but it does grind carbide. Somewhat more expensive than an ordinary aluminum oxide wheel, but not a lot more.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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BigYin

403 posts in 2251 days


#11 posted 05-15-2017 08:57 AM

is all about money.

If you have a cheap blade its disposable, all second hand wood goes through cheap blades if i hit a nail i dont cry.

If you have a good blade it goes to the saw doctor to be sharpened on a CNC diamond grind saw sharpener. Good blades have finer grain carbide, take and hold a sharper edge and generally cut better.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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OldCoach

47 posts in 709 days


#12 posted 05-16-2017 04:26 AM

I use a diamond blade used for cutting tile on a cheap 10” portable saw that I keep around just for this task. Just touch the carbide tip to the diamond blade with just enough pressure to hold it for a second or two. Of course all my blades are less expensive box store blades. If I used high dollar blades I might use a professional.

-- Play cowboy on weekends and make sawdust in between when not watching football

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 737 days


#13 posted 05-16-2017 04:50 AM

a cheap wet saw with a diamond blade and a jig to help match the angles will work. results will be okay but not good.

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