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Stripping: How to Take it All Off?

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Forum topic by pashley posted 11-15-2010 12:48 AM 786 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pashley

1025 posts in 2383 days


11-15-2010 12:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: stripping

Ok, that title got your attention, I’m sure.

However, this is a serious question, about stripping furniture.

If you’re a pro stripper, what technique do you use? Chemical? mechanical?

I would like to throw this idea out at you – glass bead blasting. It’s like sand blasting, only using glass beads, which are about the size of grains of sand, only spherical in nature, not like sand, which are shards with sharp edges, and can erode the wood.

I’m wondering if anyone has tried that technique?

In lieu of that, what chemical stripper can you recommend that is something I can get locally?

Thanks much!

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com


2 replies so far

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dannymac

144 posts in 1681 days


#1 posted 11-15-2010 01:12 AM

on a really fine piece of furniture i prefer to do everything by hand . the picture next to my name is a 200 year old desk that some fool started to strip then threw in the trash . i com pleted the job with a variety of small delicate rasps, dental picks, assorted scappers and razor blades.
On projects that will be painted anyway i’ll use a chemicel stipper. it sometimes darkens the wood but if it’s gonna be painted again it doesn’t matter. for any other type of project i’ll use heat but just enough to soften the paint so as tonot damage the wood. hope this helps

-- dannymac

View Brandon Hintz's profile

Brandon Hintz

53 posts in 1674 days


#2 posted 11-15-2010 03:33 AM

In a kitchen I did recently I used an abrasive media blaster with crushed walnut shells, but even on oak you have to be very careful the pressure has to be set lower than normal and you can move no slower than when you first see bare wood if there are lots of detail or a softer wood its best done by hand

-- Potential is limited only by imagination

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