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Photographing Your Work

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Forum topic by NBeener posted 1376 days ago 1547 views 2 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NBeener

4806 posts in 1800 days


1376 days ago

Something I definitely need to put a lot more time, effort, and thought into …

NOTE: I think RalphBarker was probably right (thank you, Ralph).

Posting the article in its entirety probably IS a no-no; therefore, I deleted the scanned images OF the article. It’d be good if we could simply use this thread as a place to discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly—as each of us has learned it—of product photography.

Obviously, this can matter a LOT to those who are trying to sell their projects.

But it may also matter a fair bit to those who simply want to take better pictures of what they’ve built.

On my short list of things to do IS to build a DIY Light Box For Product Photography

Inexpensive. Simple. Effective.

Just saw a production version, at a store, over the weekend. It was made by these people and REALLY showcased this retailer’s (Southwestern, Native American jewelry) wares—even lighting, great contrast and color, and no significant shadows.

He used Home Depot clamp-on lamps with high-wattage bulbs. His bulbs were quite old, so … I didn’t see much sense in getting make/model info from them.

-- -- Neil


20 replies so far

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 1376 days ago

Interesting; I guess it is important if you are trying to promote your work. I have some experience as an amateur photographer, but as long as my WW pics are in focus and properly exposed, I don’t care too much about setting up a lightbox or remote flashes.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2299 days


#2 posted 1376 days ago

I also need to photograph my work better.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2391 days


#3 posted 1376 days ago

Rob has a good point about just wanting to have photos that are exposed correctly and in focus. The lights (and stands, remote slaves, etc.) can get expensive in a hurry. I don’t even think that WW’s trying to make a living would want to spend the extra bucks for all that stuff when they could probably hook up with a studio photographer that would be willing to work out a deal of some kind in exchange for some services. Believe it or not, there’s really not much difference in photography in ‘98 and today. I think there were a lot of digital cameras in use in ‘98, but most were probably film cameras. I’m sure there are some lighting systems just for digital shooting, but I’ve not had any problems using the lights that I used with film cameras and the digital cameras I use now. I would like to take a closer look at this magazine, I’m sure it has some good tips (especially about saving $$$).
- JJ

View john's profile

john

2293 posts in 3007 days


#4 posted 1376 days ago

I use natural sunlight and mother nature to improve my pictures .

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

View mrg's profile

mrg

520 posts in 1625 days


#5 posted 1376 days ago

I do some catalog photography and you don’t need expensive equipment. Almost any digital camera can be used, a couple of cfl daylite bulbs and worklites and a back drop. Experiment a little with the lighting and camera settings and you will be shooting great photo’s.

-- mrg

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 1921 days


#6 posted 1376 days ago

Neil the print is too small for me to read !!
Guess I will have to dig through my archive of magazines.
I have been meaning to build a light box forever now.
Thanks for the reminder : )

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View RalphBarker's profile

RalphBarker

80 posts in 1395 days


#7 posted 1376 days ago

Not to be a nag, but posting a full copy of the article may violate Taunton’s copyright.

The degree of photographic skill required is really a function of how the photographs will be used. Doing “snapshots” for forum sharing is one thing, but photographs used for a professional woodworking portfolio would be another entirely.

View Dennis Fletcher's profile

Dennis Fletcher

455 posts in 1680 days


#8 posted 1376 days ago

I guess that my photography from my 3 mp phone camera seems barbaric, but I can’t afford to get more photo stuff, for what few small projects I have. However, it would probably be a good thing to get a better digital camera for my larger projects.

-- http://www.ahomespecialist.net, Making design and application one. †

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2391 days


#9 posted 1376 days ago

Dennis, I think that just by having those kids around justifies having a decent camera around….
- JJ

View Dennis Fletcher's profile

Dennis Fletcher

455 posts in 1680 days


#10 posted 1376 days ago

JJ,

Your right, that is why my wife has a nice 10.1 mp camera. I just don’t have my own for the jobsite, as I just can’t justify the extra expense when my phone does pretty well, at the moment. Plus, I need to get some new tools and a new truck, so, one more year of no knew camera. :-)

-- http://www.ahomespecialist.net, Making design and application one. †

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2391 days


#11 posted 1376 days ago

I hear you Dennis…... we all do what we can…. and new tools would be a priority.
- JJ

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#12 posted 1376 days ago

Nice pics John! I think mostly anything looks better in natural light.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View MrsN's profile

MrsN

939 posts in 2151 days


#13 posted 1375 days ago

I posted a review of a light tent I bought. While looking for info on building my own light tent I ran across the one I got on amazon, it has been well worth the 20 bucks I spent. If you are photographing something small, I would buy or make a light tent. It really helps alot.

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

View jack1's profile

jack1

1912 posts in 2653 days


#14 posted 1375 days ago

I use one of those dust covers from my table saw now to bake a neutral back drop sometimes. Works pretty well usually.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View antmjr's profile

antmjr

262 posts in 1809 days


#15 posted 1375 days ago

Interesting, I do want to build my light box too (my big problem has always been to photograph drawings, I wonder if a dedicated light box would work with them too). The other problem is to take photograph in the shop while working, ie to show a method, not an object

-- Antonio

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