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one wide board or a glued up panel . pros and cons?

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Forum topic by tcarswell posted 05-09-2017 05:55 PM 1405 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tcarswell

78 posts in 1138 days


05-09-2017 05:55 PM

I’m having a bit of an internal dialogue about this now . I keep reading single board larger panels will cup. I’m a big fan of single board Panels for obvious reasons. I’ve also read this isn’t true. In your experience what have you guys found ? I haven’t personally had trouble but I don’t have more than 2 years hobby level experience.

-- Nothing worth doing is easy ! (or simple) It's time to move past cultural Marxism. 120 million bodies is more than enough to learn that lesson .


14 replies so far

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jbay

1860 posts in 738 days


#1 posted 05-09-2017 06:15 PM

Depends on what you’re doing and the type wood you’re using.
I’m a bigger fan of 5-6” wide pieces myself, but then again, it all depends.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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tcarswell

78 posts in 1138 days


#2 posted 05-09-2017 06:35 PM

In my current project I’m thinking in regards to a krenov cabinet and a pennsylvania spice box sides and top. They are both in the 12 to 14 inch wide range and I have the lumber wide enough to do one piece. It’s obviously important that what I make lasts as many generations as possible. So stability is a concern.

-- Nothing worth doing is easy ! (or simple) It's time to move past cultural Marxism. 120 million bodies is more than enough to learn that lesson .

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UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1822 days


#3 posted 05-09-2017 06:44 PM

I’d say so long as the wood is stable and is in a climate close to what it has been stored in and the joinery is sound you shouldn’t see a problem. If it will be in high humidity or a very dry place you may run into trouble, also if you can get a more stable cut of wood QS vs rift or flat that will help also, but good luck with 12” wide QS pieces that will be hard to find and expensive at least where I am it is.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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jdmaher

417 posts in 2419 days


#4 posted 05-09-2017 06:55 PM

Usually, I HAVE to make panels for anything over about 12”. I hate making panels. Now, if I get a really nice board that will re-saw and book-match beautifully, it feels worth the effort. But that don’t happen often.

I use wide boards whenever I can. I did, in fact, note some cupping in a few cases (3), years ago. When I examined those components, I noticed that they were all boards from near tree center. Since then, I try to pick boards that are more straight-grained. Haven’t noticed the problem in the last 20 years.

It may be important that almost everything I build goes in to somebody’s house with forced air heat in the winter and central air conditioning in the summer. Not really exposed to much seasonal humidity change.

Although I try to be careful, I believe problems like this might arise in my pieces in 50 – 100 years. I won’t have to fix ‘em.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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tcarswell

78 posts in 1138 days


#5 posted 05-09-2017 08:34 PM

Yeah those are tough to find. Usually I design a small cabinet like above around one choice wide board so I get a good mix of qs and flat sawn grain to use with good color matching . I’ve heard of people ripping wide stock down and re assembling it. That doesn’t sound right but that’s why I’m asking this isn’t my area of expertise I suppose because I’ve heard so much conflicting information

-- Nothing worth doing is easy ! (or simple) It's time to move past cultural Marxism. 120 million bodies is more than enough to learn that lesson .

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jdmaher

417 posts in 2419 days


#6 posted 05-09-2017 10:34 PM

Wide AND straight-grained IS hard to find for me, too. That’s why I make panels.

I try to visit lumber stores whenever I get the chance. I usually find something I want, usually for some future project. I’m currently on a self-imposed diet. Gotta use up what I’ve got to make room for more.

I have NEVER ripped down a wide board and re-glued it, and I won’t, and I can’t advise ever doing that. I try to pick reasonably straight-grained and reasonably wide boards. If I can’t find those, I don’t buy anything. It’s frustrating, but for me it’s all about the wood.

Patience, grasshopper, patience.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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pontic

505 posts in 448 days


#7 posted 05-09-2017 11:43 PM

I glue up my panels. Counter cup and “bow joint” them. Much more stable for a wide stretch of wood.
I do a fair amount of resawing as well. Usually don’t resaw more than 6-8”.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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tcarswell

78 posts in 1138 days


#8 posted 05-10-2017 09:08 AM



Wide AND straight-grained IS hard to find for me, too. That s why I make panels.

I try to visit lumber stores whenever I get the chance. I usually find something I want, usually for some future project. I m currently on a self-imposed diet. Gotta use up what I ve got to make room for more.

I have NEVER ripped down a wide board and re-glued it, and I won t, and I can t advise ever doing that. I try to pick reasonably straight-grained and reasonably wide boards. If I can t find those, I don t buy anything. It s frustrating, but for me it s all about the wood.

Patience, grasshopper, patience.

- jdmaher

I take everything pretty slowly and since it’s just a hobby for me if i don’t have a wide enough piece I will find it and work on something else. I just love the look of a continuous grain and or color so I do the same as you and it sounds like we have the same issue of lumber “collecting ” if there was an anonymous program for lumber collectors I’d be all over it. Thanks so much for the input . I had to Google bow joint so I always love learning new stuff I really like this forum.

-- Nothing worth doing is easy ! (or simple) It's time to move past cultural Marxism. 120 million bodies is more than enough to learn that lesson .

View Chris208's profile

Chris208

239 posts in 2109 days


#9 posted 05-10-2017 01:14 PM

I have, and will again rip wide boards and reglue them.

When I work with something that I can’t mill on my tools because it’s too wide (8 inch Jointer, 13 inch planer), I’ll rip it on the bandsaw in the straight-grain areas closer to the edges of the board, joint, plane and glue it back together. If you’re careful, you end up with invisible lines.

you can’t rip through the middle of a cathedral and expect the same hidden glue line, but in the quarter/rift parts of boards, the glue line just disappears.

Works great!

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UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1822 days


#10 posted 05-10-2017 01:24 PM



Yeah those are tough to find. Usually I design a small cabinet like above around one choice wide board so I get a good mix of qs and flat sawn grain to use with good color matching . I ve heard of people ripping wide stock down and re assembling it. That doesn t sound right but that s why I m asking this isn t my area of expertise I suppose because I ve heard so much conflicting information

- tcarswell

A lot of people rip down the wide boards because they don’t have a jointer/planer wide enough to handle the full width of the board, I bought a combo machine last year from HAMMER and can do around 11” wide jointing and planing which is plenty wide enough for 95% of my work the other 5% I’ll bust out my hand plane if I plan need to go a little wider or the router sled if it’s really big, either way you’ll figure out quick what does and doesn’t work by trial and error, hell I still few as new to this as I did when I started some days or the more I read and see on woodworking.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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rwe2156

2716 posts in 1320 days


#11 posted 05-10-2017 01:37 PM

Glue ups or wide panels can both cup it all depends on the wood and how thick the panel is.

I think he’s referring to a spring joint?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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gargey

862 posts in 615 days


#12 posted 05-10-2017 01:39 PM

Question for the ages.

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dbray45

3295 posts in 2616 days


#13 posted 05-10-2017 01:47 PM

It all depends (in my book).

If I can use a single board that is stable versus gluing up a bunch of boards, the one board has it. If the one board cups, I rip it into narrower boards and glue it up keeping it looking very consistent.

Right now, I have a few boards of mahogany that are 13” to 15” wide and about 6’ long. Ripping those into smaller pieces is not likely to happen – they are dead flat.

My work bench is a solid piece of QS 20” wide black oak, about 2” thick. It is definitely not your normal bench.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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tcarswell

78 posts in 1138 days


#14 posted 05-10-2017 06:54 PM

Yeah I will generally flatten one face with hand planes then plane or drum sand the Opposite face . My jointer is a 6 inch and it covers maybe half of my work.

-- Nothing worth doing is easy ! (or simple) It's time to move past cultural Marxism. 120 million bodies is more than enough to learn that lesson .

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