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Forum topic by WoodsmanWoodworker posted 11-14-2010 02:48 PM 1178 views 2 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2289 days


11-14-2010 02:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planes build make

http://www.fine-tools.com/jhob.htm

That is the link of these planes that look simple to make for me at least. I’m hoping someone has made types of planes similar to these easily, or if anyone knows another easy kind to build. I just want to be able to have multiple types of different plane types that actually work, and since finding them for me isn’t going to well, making them might. If anyone has information on making simple planes and/or what materials are needed to make them I’d appreciate it, thank you all.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~


8 replies so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2465 days


#1 posted 11-14-2010 04:54 PM

Those are awfully small.

Planes are pretty easy and fun. Start with laminated bodies. Modern glues will do well.

General theory:

It is a wedge of wood that holds the iron at about 45 degrees. Sometimes a little more if the grain is difficult. Less if you are looking at end grain.

If you want to whack off large chips, you need a wide mouth. Fine chips require a fine mouth.

Thick irons are more stable and take smoother cuts.

Chip breakers are a matter of taste. Many will tell you that they are mandatory. The Japanese will look at you like you are crazy.

Long straight areas require a long plane. Targeting small areas require a short plane.

Krenov style planes are easy to make and a really good place to start. Here is a video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWYUsLtUg_I

That is Ron Hock. He makes some of the best plane irons available.

Here are some similar plans:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/woodworking/1273456

Where to get the irons?

A good place to start on a limited budget is to get some replacement block plane irons. The ones you can find at the hardware store for a Stanley type block plane are fine (but a little thin)

You can get some pre-made replacement single plane irons pretty cheap here:

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=46322&cat=1,41182,46334

I picked up several of them. The are nice and quite inexpensive.

Some of the nicest are Ron Hock’s:

http://www.hocktools.com/products.htm More money but you can’t go wrong with any of his stuff.

For the smaller ones like you have in the link, you can get just the replacement irons and make your own body.

Japan Woodworker has a nice selection:

http://www.japanwoodworker.com/dept.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&dept_id=12936

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2289 days


#2 posted 11-14-2010 05:06 PM

thank you, great advice

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2465 days


#3 posted 11-14-2010 05:19 PM

One more thing…

You can use other things for the irons. Chop off the tang of a beat up chisels. Worn out files. Stay with carbon steel at first. Some of the other alloys are hard to deal with without controlled environments.

The next phase is to learn to work with metal as far as hardening and softening. You soften the metal to shape it then once you have the shape, you harden it. It is a lot of fun and opens up a whole world of possibilities for making your own tools.

It is also pretty good form to work metal in a separate area from your woodwork. The shavings and such are hard to get out of wood and can leave weird stains.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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docholladay

1287 posts in 2526 days


#4 posted 11-15-2010 01:42 AM

I watched Mark Phillips make a Krenov style plane on his show American Woodworker. You can see a video of it at http://www.woodworkingchannel.com/dolphin/vidego_video_library.php. I’m not a huge fan of Scott Phillips, but this is a pretty good video in making a plane. Also, the blade he uses in this video is actually robbed from an old woodie that the wooden part has been worn out. He just makes a new body for the iron. This is a very effective and inexpensive way to get an iron to use in a plane.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2289 days


#5 posted 11-15-2010 03:34 AM

thanks for the help doch, but i can’t seem to find that video from the link you provided, probly just me being dumb though. However i do appreciate your help.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2465 days


#6 posted 11-15-2010 06:00 AM

A little more to read about plane making:

http://www.philsville.co.uk/

General stuff about planemaking:

http://www.handplane.com/category/planemaking/making-planes

A little eye candy:

http://www.billcarterwoodworkingplanemaker.co.uk/

http://www.marcouplanes.co.nz/

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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docholladay

1287 posts in 2526 days


#7 posted 11-15-2010 01:17 PM

Across the top of the video screen, there are some tabs and you have to scroll through those tabs t find the videos for American Woodshop. From there, the title of the video is something like Antique Woodworking Tools or something like that.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#8 posted 11-17-2010 05:05 PM

I seem to remember watching a woodworking show where they made a plane. The host said that in the old days, apprentices made their own planes to develop their skills and then used them throughout their apprenticeship. I think the hand plane represents the quintessence of woodworking and craftsmanship, which is probably why planes are so prevalent in custom logos, brands, signatures, etc.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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