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Mounting a thin glass panel question

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Forum topic by Rougetet posted 1354 days ago 2081 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rougetet

7 posts in 1444 days


1354 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question maple

I am in the process of building a fairly large wineglass cabinet out of soft maple (aniline dye dark stained with a shellac finish) and want to use the Rockler 1/8” thick art deco glass (Mosaico pattern) for the door panel. I plan to cut a channel in the rails and stiles to hold the glass panel. What width channel should I rout (glass is 1/8” thick) and how much deeper than the glass width and length (19.25” x 44”) should this channel be to take care of wood movement (Dallas, indoors)? Also, anyone have experience with using .190” space balls with 1/8” thick glass to prevent rattling and cushion wood movement for glass panels? Any special considerations for using those .190 space balls in glass mounting?

Thanks.

-- Roland, Texas


10 replies so far

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2312 days


#1 posted 1354 days ago

Rougetet, Just a thought.
How about using a rabbit and molding? If the glass got broken it could be more easily replaced. also it would have give so the with of the channel wouldn’t be as critical. .190 space balls in a .125 grove???? Just how compressible are they? With a molding you could use small daubs of silicone caulking to hold glass more firmly and allow movement

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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Rougetet

7 posts in 1444 days


#2 posted 1354 days ago

Thanks Fred for the tips. I’m not sure a molding would do in the look I am after but will think about that more. The channels were not intended to be cut in the end grain but in the wide face about 1/2” into a 1 1/2” wide maple rail/stile (1/2”) thick. For the space balls I probably would need to have a 3/16” wide channel (recommended for .190” space balls) but then I am concerned that the 1/8” thick glass (only thickness available from Rockler) would be too loose. If I go that route I would probably need to add silicone caulking too as you suggest.

Again, thanks.

-- Roland, Texas

View Brandon Hintz's profile

Brandon Hintz

53 posts in 1611 days


#3 posted 1354 days ago

I like to give all my glass at least the thickness of the glass on each side for expansion and contraction, then I use silicone all the way around the glass and like Fred, mentioned use either trim to hold the glass in place or glazing points. This is how I do it and it seems to work well but there’s a million ways to do it

-- Potential is limited only by imagination

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Rougetet

7 posts in 1444 days


#4 posted 1354 days ago

Thanks, Brandon. So true about the million ways – but just as true there are probably an equal number of wrong ways to be avoided. ;-) This is my first glass project so am open to all suggestions and thanks again. My caution on using molding is that I am not sure I am experienced enough to make it look good on the front edge of the stiles (rails not as much a concern because of additional wood end pieces the glass goes into between the rails – i.e. rail, “muntin style” wood piece, glass, “muntin style” wood piece, rail is the configuration). Need that configuration because the cabinet is really 48”+ tall and the Rockler limit on their art deco glass is 44”. Was planning to tongue and groove the muntins into the channel already routed for the glass in the stiles.

-- Roland, Texas

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2312 days


#5 posted 1354 days ago

put molding on inside of door . . . . fasten with pins or tiny brads. do NOT glue

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View Brandon Hintz's profile

Brandon Hintz

53 posts in 1611 days


#6 posted 1354 days ago

When I said molding what I was really eluding to was after you make your groove in the stile and rail run the piece through the table saw cutting off the inside of the groove thus producing your molding, also to clarify on the use of silicone if used it can only go on the solid side of the glass and must be cured prior to placing the molding against the glass.

-- Potential is limited only by imagination

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Rougetet

7 posts in 1444 days


#7 posted 1354 days ago

Thanks for all the helpful suggestions guys (and any gals). Not having a table saw or the ability to get access to one (disabilities prevent driving) may complicate my ability to complete this in probably the most efficient way. Will think about this some more. Since it is for my personal use, thought if glass ever breaks I would just redo the door – that would give me something more to do to occupy my time. Thought that the biggest problem then might be getting the new door to match the original stain shade but will do more thinking on this. Thanks again.

-- Roland, Texas

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4843 posts in 1400 days


#8 posted 1354 days ago

When we remodeled six years ago I built our cabinets. The uppers in the kitchen and several others are all walnut frames with fluted glass panels. I consulted the glass company I was going to use prior to making the doors and they said “Just make the door frames and leave a rabbet in the backs. We’ll put the glass in with silicone and if you really want to you can add a molding.” I didn’t bother and there has never been an issue. There are between the kitchen, bathroom, living room and dining room cabinets 20 doors many in frequent use daily.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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Rougetet

7 posts in 1444 days


#9 posted 1353 days ago

Thanks for all the help “jocks”. Right now I am considering the following unless someone indicates why this shouldn’t work:

1) Intend to brad nail the 1 1/2” wide 1/2” thick top rail to the 1 1/2” wide 1/2” thick stiles (lock miter joint used) without glue on that top rail in order to more easily repair if glass breaks – top rail will be at about 78” height so brads/brad holes should not be noticeable and can be covered up if necessary – if glass breaks will remove door to repair
2) The channel width for the 1/8” glass will be 1/8” (plus a hair) if space balls not used, 3/16” if space balls necessary because of glass rattling after checking in a dry fit test – also silicone (or Charles Neils’ technique of modeling clay) definitely will be used with space ball usage
3) The channel depth will be 1/8” extra than the glass each side for wood movement

-- Roland, Texas

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2160 days


#10 posted 1353 days ago

Tap Plastics has clear 1/8” plastic that looks just like glass, but without the breakage issue. I’ve been using them for picture frames recently and have been very pleased. They also have non-glare, just like the custom frame shops.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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