LumberJocks

workshop layout planning???

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by Belg1960 posted 05-06-2017 10:32 AM 753 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


05-06-2017 10:32 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question shop layout

Guys, is there a good guide anywhere to do this? I need more info as what space I need to leave for each tool, what grouping makes the most sense and the like.
I do realize it will depend on the type of work being done but …......
Thanks Pat

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!


19 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2752 days


#1 posted 05-06-2017 01:40 PM

FWIW, I found pointing my 8in. jointer’s outfeed “out” a walk-through door, to be a quite handy and space-saving trick. Plus, while I park/store my bandsaw next to my TS, I put it on a mobile base so that I can maximize space for either BS or TS when in use. I use roller stands for my MS infeed when in use, put them up when not.

I guess I would say, that your shop layout depends on how YOU use your tools and the size of your workshop. One size does not fit all. Take advantage of opening doors and windows when needing that extra infeed or outfeed space. Just my 2-cents worth…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116578 posts in 3415 days


#2 posted 05-06-2017 02:21 PM

Think about work flow, as an example I have my sheet material stored close to the front of my table so I can slid it out and tilt it forward touching the edge of my table saw. Also, think about complimentary machines such as a jointer close to your table saw so you can joint one edge and then rip it on the table saw, you chop saw should be close to your table saw also. Also think about dust collection I like mine to vent outside to save floor space and costly DC ad ons . I also ran my table saw under the floor to save having to step over a DC hose all the time.Unless you’re going to use this shop for car parking think about using a wood floor it’s much easier on your body walking on plus you can run wiring and air lines underneath it easier. You want lots of electrical outlets all the way around your shop(in mine I have 110 outlets ever 4ft and 220 outlets every 6ft. I made my ceiling 14ft high so I could stand a 12ft long board on end.
A roll-up front door is good and a separate people door I like a people door in the back also for an emergency exit in case of fire. Also think about windows up high for lighting and security.You will need plenty of lighting too, think about LED’s,

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116578 posts in 3415 days


#3 posted 05-06-2017 02:31 PM

This might help with your layout

http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 758 days


#4 posted 05-06-2017 02:38 PM

Belg1960,

When I placed tools in my 2 car garage workshop, the tools were positioned so that I could operate on an 8’ long workpiece either without moving the tool or by repositioning the tool. This generally means 9’ of infeed and outfeed clearance; 1’ for some room to position the work. Except the table saw, the width of a workpiece that can be accommodated is dictated by the width that can be handled by the tool.

The table saw is more or less centered in the shop with 9’ in front and behind the table saw and 4’ to the left of the saw blade.

The crosscut saw (mine is a radial arm saw) has 9’ to the left and 6’ to the right. Sometimes I have to spend some time planning a cutting due to the 6’ free space on the right but it really is not much a problem.

The jointer and planer and shaper have 9’ of free space on both the infeed and outfeed ends.

The bandsaw and wide drum sander offer almost 6’ of infeed clearance. Rarely is this insufficient.

The drill press offers a little more than 5’ of free space on the left and more than enough free space to the right of the drill bit. I have yet to need more than 5’ of clearance to drill a hole.

Like the drill press, the hollow chisel mortiser offers about 5’ of clearance on the right and plenty of clearance on the left.

My workbench height is about ½” lower than the surface of the table saw so the workbench stays out of the way of the table saw.

On rare occasions I need additional space to complete an operation. Since all my tools except the table saw, cross cut saw, and drill press are on castors, I can reposition the tools to get the space needed.

I find that the clearance offered at my tools is almost always more than enough. One reason is that I tend to cut lumber to approximate length before milling. Shorter lumber is just easier to handle. Another reason is most projects I build rarely require a length greater than about 6’. But when more room is needed, the tools can be repositioned as needed. Since there is generous space around the table saw, I am able to breakdown sheet goods at the table saw when I elect to forego cutting sheet goods on the workbench with a track saw.

The piping in the sketch is ceiling mounted. Hopefully the machine labels are readable…

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#5 posted 05-06-2017 03:46 PM



FWIW, I found pointing my 8in. jointer s outfeed “out” a walk-through door, to be a quite handy and space-saving trick. Plus, while I park/store my bandsaw next to my TS, I put it on a mobile base so that I can maximize space for either BS or TS when in use. I use roller stands for my MS infeed when in use, put them up when not.

I guess I would say, that your shop layout depends on how YOU use your tools and the size of your workshop. One size does not fit all. Take advantage of opening doors and windows when needing that extra infeed or outfeed space. Just my 2-cents worth…

- HorizontalMike


Mike, so you’re saying that the end of the jointer faces an open door like a garage door for clearance??

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#6 posted 05-06-2017 03:48 PM



This might help with your layout

http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner

- a1Jim


This looks like a good way to start allot less strain on your back. ;-)
To accommodate your layout whats the size of your shop??

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2752 days


#7 posted 05-06-2017 03:52 PM

Yes it is. I also have to keep space open to pull my Harley in, turn it around, and back it into its parking spot. That is why so much space between the jointer and TS.

http://horizontalheavens.com/GarageWorkshop/WorkshopLayout/Workshop2_12-20-2010.jpg

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#8 posted 05-06-2017 03:52 PM



Belg1960,

When I placed tools in my 2 car garage workshop, the tools were positioned so that I could operate on an 8’ long workpiece either without moving the tool or by repositioning the tool. This generally means 9’ of infeed and outfeed clearance; 1’ for some room to position the work. Except the table saw, the width of a workpiece that can be accommodated is dictated by the width that can be handled by the tool.

The table saw is more or less centered in the shop with 9’ in front and behind the table saw and 4’ to the left of the saw blade.

The crosscut saw (mine is a radial arm saw) has 9’ to the left and 6’ to the right. Sometimes I have to spend some time planning a cutting due to the 6’ free space on the right but it really is not much a problem.

The jointer and planer and shaper have 9’ of free space on both the infeed and outfeed ends.

The bandsaw and wide drum sander offer almost 6’ of infeed clearance. Rarely is this insufficient.

The drill press offers a little more than 5’ of free space on the left and more than enough free space to the right of the drill bit. I have yet to need more than 5’ of clearance to drill a hole.

Like the drill press, the hollow chisel mortiser offers about 5’ of clearance on the right and plenty of clearance on the left.

My workbench height is about ½” lower than the surface of the table saw so the workbench stays out of the way of the table saw.

On rare occasions I need additional space to complete an operation. Since all my tools except the table saw, cross cut saw, and drill press are on castors, I can reposition the tools to get the space needed.

I find that the clearance offered at my tools is almost always more than enough. One reason is that I tend to cut lumber to approximate length before milling. Shorter lumber is just easier to handle. Another reason is most projects I build rarely require a length greater than about 6’. But when more room is needed, the tools can be repositioned as needed. Since there is generous space around the table saw, I am able to breakdown sheet goods at the table saw when I elect to forego cutting sheet goods on the workbench with a track saw.

The piping in the sketch is ceiling mounted. Hopefully the machine labels are readable…

- JBrow


Allot of great info and I really like the drawing that brings it right into focus.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#9 posted 05-06-2017 03:56 PM

Mike, thanks for the pic really handy.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1769 posts in 2155 days


#10 posted 05-07-2017 04:08 AM

It’s impossible to get the perfect layout – especially if the projects you take on change over time. So make everything mobile and plan your dust collection for rapid changes in machinery layout. I still need to get my chopsaws, planers, bandsaws, table saws and the drill press on mobile platforms but almost everything else is on wheels by now (includes the filing cabinets).

Eventually, I will redo my duct to add more wye’s to the main branches and cap off the extras that aren’t needed. I’ll either use flex hose or a very short run of Nordfab duct to connect to the machines. That will allow me to adapt the dust collection to new layouts quickly and without spending big money on a full Nordfab layout.

Some days I’m making small stuff and I want to pull my machinery in close. Other days I’m building large items and need more clearance for infeed and outfeed.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116578 posts in 3415 days


#11 posted 05-07-2017 04:18 AM

Sorry for the late response Pat
My shop is 26’x32’ and has way too much in it. :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2577 posts in 2760 days


#12 posted 05-07-2017 12:14 PM

While planning the lay out of my shop, I looked at each machine and determined the footprint of the machine, plus max infeed and outfeed dimensions. I then made cardboard shapes of them, to scale, and placed them in various configurations on a scale drawing of my shop. I also have my jointer and my planer near the entrance door to accommodate long board milling. This was four years ago, and have made minor changes as I got different equipment for my shop.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#13 posted 05-07-2017 05:44 PM



Sorry for the late response Pat
My shop is 26×32 and has way too much in it. :))

- a1Jim


Wish I had that much space.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#14 posted 05-07-2017 05:46 PM


plus max infeed and outfeed dimensions.
- Jim Finn

This is what I’m really struggling with figuring the dimensions for the “ideal” layout.
I like the planner from grizzly real easy on your back. Its a place to start.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2903 days


#15 posted 05-07-2017 05:48 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/JAAune I plan on making as mobile as I can for sure. Planning for the future is a given as we all seem to “upgrade” or add to our tool collection as we can.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com