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Forum topic by Carrick_Bend posted 1349 days ago 2642 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carrick_Bend

30 posts in 1446 days


1349 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question refurbishing sharpening

Folks,

I have a project that I’d like to get finished before Christmas. I have what appears to be an old Case knife that my Father-in-Law has carried with him for longer than I know. Well, he wasn’t feeling well. My wife and I visited him and I found his knife needing some TLC. It’s a two-blade folding pocket knife. The blades are rusted, and dull. I would like to replace the scales. Clean the blades up to a “like-new” appearance and sharpen them up real nice for him.

Break

So, Here’s the problem. I know that this can be done. I have no idea where to start or what products to use. I will take pictures of the knife today and post them. If anyone has suggestions, directions, recommendations…I’d appreciate. It’d be a great Christmas gift if I could pull it off.

Patrick

-- Patrick, Virginia


17 replies so far

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racerglen

2254 posts in 1376 days


#1 posted 1349 days ago

Step one would be the cleanup..depending on the depth of rust it could be a hard one. A number of posters have suggested evaporust as one choice on the “chemical ” side.
a relativley fine scotchbrite pad to follow ? (oh, and save the sharpening to LAST !..it’s easier on the fingers !)
What sort of scales does it have ? bone, horn , wood or ? Getting the rivits out and cleaning under the scales would be next, if they must be repaced..
If they’re just dirty or scared up I’d probably leave them with a cleaning

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

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Carrick_Bend

30 posts in 1446 days


#2 posted 1348 days ago

O, so I don’t have a photobucket account…I guess the photos will wait a moment.

Break

Glen,

Thank you for your input. I appreciate the interest. I have never done this before, but I figured that there were some saavy knife types on here who would know where to go with it. I had never heard of EVAPORUST, but WC has something called “Rust-Free”...Would you happen to know if that would work? The Scales appear to be of a plastic faux-bone look…Truthfully, I don’t know. My intent is to spruce it up with some nice colored scales and make it an heirloom type item…maybe, that is a little high on the expectations for this project, but all inputs and thoughts are greatly appreciated.

BT

Anyone know where a good knife making/scale replacement video is?

-- Patrick, Virginia

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#3 posted 1348 days ago

How are the blades? Most of my dad’s and my everyday users have had the blades sharpened down to “0”!! :-))

I have never done it, but have intentions of doing some knives I got off ebay. Looks like all that is needed is drill off the rivet heads and hope the scales weren’t glued or epoxied. Careful fitting, rerivet and done???? I hope :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#4 posted 1348 days ago

BTW, I’ll be watching with interest to see what you get into and how you handle it :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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racerglen

2254 posts in 1376 days


#5 posted 1348 days ago

It’s a whole lot easier to do a fixed blade knife’s handle than a pocket knife. I have a pocket knife, Bear Manufacturing, that I was given as a 15th aniversary gift after 18 years, yah, I know, but new company bought us, that has been in my pocket for over 20. One side a company logo in bronze the other a thin slice of “stabalized” wood. A couple of butterfinger drops and the scales popped off. There’s no rivits in them, so it’s been crazy glue, then 5 min epoxy when that let go..and then using the wood as a patern for a replacement..a well seasoned chunk from my neighbour’s now wacked plumb tree.. so far the epoxy’s holding . Sooo… the main thing is making sure the two surfaces are flat where they meet..but NOT completely smooth.. the glue needs a bit of tooth or it can’t grab. my plumb scale’s actualy a bit thicker than the orriginal,
just tapered down at the ends to match up with the brass bolsters. As for the blade(s), Topamax’s got a great point, the old ones are another problem with how many times they’ve been charpened and how..
A buddy (?) used to simply walk over to the shop bench grinder and whirrr off some when ever his needed a “touch up” and when there wasn’t enough steel left, buy a new knife..
Hope we’re getting somewhere here.. Good luck !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#6 posted 1348 days ago

Carry one long enough and it will be gone using a stone :-)) My grandpa’s was like that. All used up. I have some that have 1/2 the blade gone form stoning. I can’t imagine how many knives a guyh could use up in a year using a grinder!! :-(( Those are for mower blades :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Howie

2656 posts in 1518 days


#7 posted 1348 days ago

Carric,you don’t need a photobucket account,use the img button.

-- Life is good.

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racerglen

2254 posts in 1376 days


#8 posted 1348 days ago

No kidding.. I’ve redone some OLD kitchen knives of late, including a HUGE butcher knife, 19 and a half inches overall !
the good thing, lots of depth in the Schefield steel from the early 1900’s so i was able to take some of the curve out of the area ahead of the new walnut handle on the , yah I know, grinder, and resharpen..AFTER doing the handle. :-)

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#9 posted 1347 days ago

Nothiing wrong with doing shape on a grinder, but add an “r” and it is the sharp that makes us gringe ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Carrick_Bend

30 posts in 1446 days


#10 posted 1347 days ago

Well, now that I see all the buttons at the top of a post. Here’s three photos of the knife.

-- Patrick, Virginia

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Howie

2656 posts in 1518 days


#11 posted 1347 days ago

I suggest using a fine grit emory cloth on the blades. You can shine and sharpen at the same time. You can buy handle blanks at some woodworking stores (woodcrafters) that would look real nice once you finish them.

-- Life is good.

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mtnwild

3474 posts in 2123 days


#12 posted 1347 days ago

Nice old folding hunter.
I’d get some good rust remover for the blades. I use ” Top saver” myself. I hear there are other good rust removers out there also. Don’t grind the blades until the rust is removed first. Then you can see if you really want to. Not the best thing to grind the blades. Sharpen as normal after rust removal.
The scales look okay, just missing the shield.
If you want to remove the scales and put new handles, you can carefully grind through the old scales and brass pins, or I usually use a box cutter blade and a hammer to remove the scales. Just position the blade between the scales and the steel of the knife and strike well. Will go right through the old pins and pop those scales right off.
Use the old scales for a temp-let, Shape, epoxy, buff. Nothing to it. Saw your steak knives, nice, you can do it.

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#13 posted 1347 days ago

Thanks for the hot tips jack :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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airman

48 posts in 1812 days


#14 posted 1346 days ago

I have used VAPORUST before with good results. Just pour it in a container, open the knife and drop it in. Let it soak for several hours and the rust will be gone. you can find it at any auto parts store.

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brunob

2275 posts in 2765 days


#15 posted 1346 days ago

I agree with mtnwild. I think I’d keep the scales. Like any other antique, removing them would decrease the value. Clean and sharpen the blades.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

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