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Forum topic by Karda posted 05-04-2017 10:09 PM 906 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

819 posts in 392 days


05-04-2017 10:09 PM

I have noticed that in sharpening videos many turners use 40% angle on their tools. my question is when adjusting your tool rest how do you deterring the angle of tilt, there are no right angle on the grinder to measure against. thanks Mike


17 replies so far

View Lee's profile

Lee

95 posts in 717 days


#1 posted 05-04-2017 11:44 PM

Well, if the bench your grinder is on is level you can use a rotary dial level to set the tool rest angle. or if you have a wixey angle finder it will be more accurate. Good luck

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

367 posts in 1015 days


#2 posted 05-04-2017 11:53 PM

The Veritas rest comes with a little angle finder for common angles. It’s the hexagonal thing pictured in this link:

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=32973&cat=1,43072,45938

You could make your own out of scrap wood easily enough.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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Karda

819 posts in 392 days


#3 posted 05-05-2017 12:17 AM

yea that would be nice but I can afford expensive rests I have to make my own or find another way

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10638 posts in 2219 days


#4 posted 05-05-2017 12:42 AM

View Karda's profile

Karda

819 posts in 392 days


#5 posted 05-05-2017 01:38 AM

thanks rick I’ll try that

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2187 posts in 1973 days


#6 posted 05-05-2017 10:29 AM

This simple tool okay for setting angle on a grinder tool rest;
https://www.harborfreight.com/dial-gauge-angle-finder-34214.html

Outstanding way to measure tool bevel angle:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/General-Tools-5-in-Digital-Angle-Finder-822/203219287

If want repeatability at the grinder every time these jigs cannot be beat! Prefer the Wolverine Intermediate SYS because have been using for more than twenty years. Did the home made tool rest & sharpening jigs before breaking down any buying that Wolverine SYS.

True Grind
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=sharp-trugrin

Intermediate Wolverine sys.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=142629&Category_Code=sharp-wss

-- Bill

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

230 posts in 372 days


#7 posted 05-05-2017 11:20 AM

I find the angle isn’t all that critical, lower for softer woods, higher for harder woods. (carving tools, chisels and plane irons) If the tool is cutting sweet, I will match the angle. if not I will bump it up or down a little.

lathe tools run about 40-50 degrees unless it’s a scraper then about 80,

I never take time to measure. it is about getting the work done, not about making the tools perfect

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View TonyArru's profile

TonyArru

15 posts in 2053 days


#8 posted 05-05-2017 03:51 PM


I never take time to measure. it is about getting the work done, not about making the tools perfect

- EricTwice

Interesting school of thought here….Although I agree, a couple of degrees off might not matter (unless you’re a master craftsman who might notice) but, for a tool to work properly some may agree that tools need to be dialed in and in good working order to get the job done effectively and efficiently.

View Karda's profile

Karda

819 posts in 392 days


#9 posted 05-05-2017 05:41 PM

my problem is I don’t that what I see in a utube and what I do at the grinder are not the same otherwise I would be doing ok. What I need is somebody to watch me sharpen the tools and tell me where I am going wrong. now that I have figured out the proper angles I am trying Cindy Drozdas method. If I can get my grinder working. checked the new wheel now the grinder wont work if the wheels are tightened at all

View Karda's profile

Karda

819 posts in 392 days


#10 posted 05-05-2017 05:52 PM

my problem is I don’t that what I see in a utube and what I do at the grinder are not the same otherwise I would be doing ok. What I need is somebody to watch me sharpen the tools and tell me where I am going wrong. now that I have figured out the proper angles I am trying Cindy Drozdas method. If I can get my grinder working. checked the new wheel now the grinder wont work if the wheels are tightened at all

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#11 posted 05-05-2017 05:54 PM

Look at the RoboHippy rest. Lots of good info there.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2187 posts in 1973 days


#12 posted 05-05-2017 09:33 PM

Sharpening your tools and bevel angle to use really depends upon personal preference, type gouge deep or shallow fluted, skill level, style or design of the project. Once a turner becomes proficient with a tool they don’t change much, a degree or too one way or the other doesn’t make much difference!

Common bevel angles for spindle gouges rang from 30 to 45 degrees.
Skew chisels 12 to 20 degrees. Parting tools 30 to 50 degrees
Bowls, range from 30 to 65 degrees. Bowls scrapers, normally range 70 to 80 degrees.

If you come away from the grinder with lot of facets on tool bevel and different angle every time you sharpen your tools will never really enjoy the craft of woodturning.

Tool rest that come with your grinder often difficult to use sharpening your tools so either after market rest or sharpening system will get you proficient at sharpening faster. cannot you want repeatability every time you re-sharpen your tool!

-- Bill

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

230 posts in 372 days


#13 posted 05-06-2017 12:27 PM

years ago a friend told me that the difference in cutting angles on a turning gouge had to do with the height of the turner. a tall person needs a high angle. he will hold the tool higher and a short person the other way round.

I was to sharpen them so they would be comfortable for me to use, and that the angle really didn’t matter as long as they are sharp.

In spindle turning, the diameter of the spindle, the height of the tool rest and the angle of the tool grind will determine the angle of the best cut.

To find the best attack angle for your tool; rest the body of the tool on the rest and the heel of the edge against the wood and let it bump. Slowly and smoothly slide the tool until the cutting edge engages the wood. If your tool is sharp you will get a nice ribbon of wood. this angle will cut very quickly and cleanly.

If the tool is uncomfortable to hold, change the angle of the grind.

This is the old wisdom of turning

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View Karda's profile

Karda

819 posts in 392 days


#14 posted 05-07-2017 03:28 AM

thanks for the angle reference that gives me something too go by. I was following the angle on the tool I got but the angle has changed with sharpening and some where I screwed up. I had to reshape the edge. I am back to the grinder but have to make a better tool rest that I can set to 40%. What worries me is I will sharpen away my gouge before I learn to sharpen it.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2187 posts in 1973 days


#15 posted 05-07-2017 10:35 AM

When you pick up any turning tool have to know the bevel angle of the tool before can make any adjustments if necessary. My homemade $0.50 angle checker nothing more than two school protractors with nut & bolt thru the centers doesn’t get much use these days. Mostly used on new tools when first get them, and changing bevel angle if need too. Lets me know angle on the tool before even going to the grinder and make a quick check after grinding!

Here are some plans for making homemade sharpening systems! Sharpening jigs will give you repeatability at the grinder every time. Sharpening systems & jigs not perfect due to couple things; but learning curve is a lot quicker giving you one smooth bevel.

https://www.woodturningonline.com/assets/turning_articles/sharpening-jig/sj.php

https://www.woodturningonline.com/assets/turning_articles/Grinding_Jig/grinding_jig.php

Most production and many amateur turners freehand sharpen without any difficulty. Already said being a degree or two off no big problem as long as have a consistent bevel without lot of facets. All you need is a light touch and smooth tool movement on the grinding wheel. Same thing can be said about sharpening system & jigs.

-- Bill

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