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Replacing a switch on a Craftsman 113 table saw

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Forum topic by justinwdemoss posted 1391 days ago 4269 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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justinwdemoss

146 posts in 1532 days


1391 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: table saw craftsman 11329940 switch rewire replace shematic

I am rehabbing a craftsman table saw 113.29940. The switch is all but totally shot and I want a paddle switch for safety. Tomorrow, this switch

http://woodworker.com/onoff-switch-wstop-enclosure-mssu-140-066.asp?search=paddle%20switch&searchmode=2

will be arriving via UPS. Does anyone have experience wiring this find of thing. Right now the motor have a cord with a plug that runs to the switch and the switch has a 10 gauge power cord. Do I need to cut the plug off the motor cord, strip the wires and hard wire it to the switch? Can I reuse the 10guage cord from the old switch as the power cord to the new switch?

Second, does anyone know where I can get a schematic or at least a walk through of how to wire it up?

Thanks in advance

Justin in Loveland

-- Justin in Loveland, OH


7 replies so far

View traupmann's profile

traupmann

124 posts in 1424 days


#1 posted 1390 days ago

I have one on my 220v table saw and one on my 110v router plug. There are 3 terminals in and 3 out (right side, left side) Run the Hot (black) and the neutral (white) through the switch (if you have a grey or solid wire ground, don’t cut it.), so that both sides are cut when the switch is off. No chance of getting you fried that way. Unless there is some reason why you might want to change all that, just replace the switch with the new switch.

It is quite easy to do. I love mine, because I can knee it when my hands are busy. Send me a note, and if you are struggling to do this. I will send you a picture of mine tomorrow.

-- chas -- looking for Serta sponsorship to go Pro...

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justinwdemoss

146 posts in 1532 days


#2 posted 1390 days ago

Thanks for the help. If its not too much trouble, i would love to see a pic. What would you recommend grounding the cords to? The body of the saw going in from the power and going out to the motor?

Justin

-- Justin in Loveland, OH

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TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2312 days


#3 posted 1390 days ago

All metalic parts need to be grounded. If the wire is stranded, as most cords are, use a crimp on connector or a lug with a screw in it Think of the ground as the brakes for your car. Would you drive without brakes?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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traupmann

124 posts in 1424 days


#4 posted 1389 days ago

Sorry, I have been laying brick pavers all day and am exhausted.
Quickly though. there are 3 screw terminals on each side.
If you are replacing the original switch, crimp on a connector that fits the terminal (small)
Wire the black and white wire from the machine to the switch.
Wire the black and the white wire from the plug to the other side of the switch on corresponding terminals.
This should be quite easy, but if you are in doubt then find someone with some rudimentary knowledge of wiring a switch—or an electrician if you want to be quite safe.

-- chas -- looking for Serta sponsorship to go Pro...

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justinwdemoss

146 posts in 1532 days


#5 posted 1389 days ago

Chas,

Thanks a lot, that was my plan, I just wanted to double check. One last thing though, what did you do with the ground wire. The switch has a place to ground on the load side (from the power cord), but what about the ground on line to the motor? Can I attach it to the same ground as the power cord?

-- Justin in Loveland, OH

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traupmann

124 posts in 1424 days


#6 posted 1389 days ago

Do not have a break in the ground wire! Do not run it through the ‘switch’ in a manner that it will break the ground circuit. Only attach the ground to the switch (at bottom) on the appropriate location to the ground circuit. The ground circuit should be run to the motor and ground the housing. The Idea for the 3rd line or ground is for safety. Do not ‘open’ it by connecting it to a switched terminal. If there is no line ground line going to the motor, you can run a 3rd wire there or simply clamp it under a bolt head on the table.

The other thing I suggest is to have a ground fault circuit. If the circuit you are using is not a ground fault, you can either change the plug to a ground fault or you can buy a ground fault adapter that plugs into the outlet (Home Depot ~$15) The ground line is your safety net. The ground fault is the policeman.

There is much to be careful of in a shop: blades, knives, toxic chemicals and electricity. Getting cut is one thing, severing a finger is a permanent loss, but electricity kills you! Use the best of the Knowledge Base available to you.

I want to caution you, I am not an expert. These are my understandings from using the switch you had a question for, and long use of electricity and machinery. If you are conflicted or unsure, hire a Licensed Electrician to review your setup. (Many will do it for little or no charge—sometimes just a cold beer!)

-- chas -- looking for Serta sponsorship to go Pro...

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TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2312 days


#7 posted 1389 days ago

Normally, you splice the ground wire in the switch box and ground it to the box with a pigtail if it is metalic. The switch may or may not have a grounding lug on it. If it does, ground it. All green screws get a ground wire. Trust me, been at it for 40+ yrs :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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