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Tips for hand tool rip cutting for thinner boards?

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Forum topic by DeaconHighlander posted 05-03-2017 02:37 AM 1225 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DeaconHighlander

2 posts in 227 days


05-03-2017 02:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand tools rip cut tips question trick tip

Hello,

I’m looking for suggestions on how to use hand tools (I have/use Japanese tools because I work on the floor, but the concepts should be universal?) to rip cut 8-quarter stock into 1/2” thickness. Thanks!

-- With Abandon, Patrick


8 replies so far

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 775 days


#1 posted 05-03-2017 03:06 AM

A frame saw is probably the tool to use if you’re going to do it by hand.

There are lots of examples of them on the net.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1765 posts in 482 days


#2 posted 05-03-2017 10:27 AM

I have found the kerfing plane (rebate saw) to be the key to resawing. The kerf helps keep the rip saw on track.
 

 

 

 
To date my thinnest resaw is 1/8 of an inch using a No. 8 rip saw.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1185 posts in 417 days


#3 posted 05-03-2017 10:36 AM

Exactly what Bill and Ron said. Kerfing plane plus frame saw, and you’re set.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3932 days


#4 posted 05-03-2017 05:05 PM

I think there is a Japanese plane that performs a similar function the a kerfing plane. I’ll have to think about where I saw that.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View DeaconHighlander's profile

DeaconHighlander

2 posts in 227 days


#5 posted 05-03-2017 10:59 PM

Thank you, gents! I’ll first try using a gauge as a possible simple way accomplish something similar to the kerfing plane. Given how thin a Royba saw is and the increased control, it may work. Thank you again!

-- With Abandon, Patrick

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1765 posts in 482 days


#6 posted 05-04-2017 01:43 PM



Thank you, gents! I ll first try using a gauge as a possible simple way accomplish something similar to the kerfing plane. Given how thin a Royba saw is and the increased control, it may work. Thank you again!

- DeaconHighlander

By “gauge” may I assume you are referring to a marking gauge? I’m not sure you’ll get the depth you need with a marking gauge. When I use the kerfing plane for resawing, I’ll set the depth to at least 1/2 inch.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1185 posts in 417 days


#7 posted 05-05-2017 10:25 AM

A marking gauge can help, especially if you go over the marks with a knife, but a kerfing plane, as Ron points out, gives you a lot more kerf to steer the saw blade. I can usually rip red oak cleanly with only a little wandering using a marking gauge and knife, but I won’t attempt resawing that way. Going to ½” thickness, you might be able to get by with a marking gauge and a knife, but if I were trying it, I’d probably aim for 9/16 or 5/8 and plane down to a half to allow for my wandering saw (and a thin blade can wander more on you).

But heck, give it a try. Best way in the world to learn what works for you and the piece of wood you’re working with.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

226 posts in 251 days


#8 posted 05-09-2017 11:54 PM

Here’s a YouTube of someone making a kerfing plane using a Japanese Saw Blade.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTTzx46z9Bg

Iain

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

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