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Forum topic by Blair613 posted 05-03-2017 01:47 AM 633 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


05-03-2017 01:47 AM

Topic tags/keywords: milling logs sawmill white pine purpleheart padauk pine

Hi Everyone,
How do I estimate how many 1 1/8” x 10 1/4” boards I would get from a truck load of logs?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.


20 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27044 posts in 2171 days


#1 posted 05-03-2017 02:34 AM

Without dimensions of the actual logs and the size of the truck, it’s impossible to calculate. I buy logs by the semi load. I get between 5000 and 5500 board feet in that load.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#2 posted 05-03-2017 02:38 AM

Hi Monte,
Thank you for the response. Approximately how many feet of logs are on a semi?

Blair

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1303 days


#3 posted 05-03-2017 04:10 AM



Hi Monte,
Thank you for the response. Approximately how many feet of logs are on a semi?

Blair

- Blair613

How big is a “standard” window? How many tomatoes can you pick from a tomato plant? How much does a dog eat in a day?

... I might be a jerk here, but you’re asking REALLY vague questions that require at least some kind of figure to start with.

Not all semi trailers are even the same length, and they won’t all be stacked to the same height. Additionally, depending on the diameter of the individual logs loaded in, there will be more or less empty space.

You need to qualify your questions with some data otherwise they’re completely useless.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#4 posted 05-03-2017 04:52 AM

That’s really kind of you. There reason why I’m here asking questions is because I know nothing. As for a standard window, we all know when a window isn’t “standard” size.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1303 days


#5 posted 05-03-2017 05:48 AM



That s really kind of you. There reason why I m here asking questions is because I know nothing. As for a standard window, we all know when a window isn t “standard” size.

- Blair613

You’re not going to be able to get any help with this question here because the answer requires information that you can’t provide. If you are serious about getting this question answered then I suggest you contact a supplier of raw materials (logs, in this case) and ask them.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View weathersfuori's profile

weathersfuori

85 posts in 963 days


#6 posted 05-03-2017 10:48 AM

In fairness to the OP, my impression was not that he wants you to calculate it for him, but that he wants to know how it’s calculated. But maybe my interpretation is incorrect because I know nothing about this either. I would guess it is estimated by the number of logs on the truck, their length, diameter, and then some kind of multiplier/factor that is based on how the logs are cut to those dimensions. It should be fairly simple math, but not having any experience with what a log of “x” size actually yields, I can’t really help.

-- Weathersfuori, Texas, www.facebook.com/f5creations

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Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#7 posted 05-03-2017 11:11 AM

Thanks Weathers. That’s what I was looking for.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2633 posts in 2006 days


#8 posted 05-03-2017 02:03 PM

To figure board ft in a log you need some good math skills and formulas or a scaling stick where the math is done for you.
You need to know diameter at both ends and length of log to get approx BF. How many 101/4 board in a log if the log is 10” in diameter none.
As far as how many linear ft on a load. I’ll guess with you. The most common log length is 33’ You can get 2 16” board out of this length or other combinations. Depending on the log taper and or mill requirements. You could have 37’ logs. The tree might yield 2 33’ and a 12’6” log. It is pretty much impossible to get an average linear ft on a load. Nobody figures wood in linear ft at a mill. It all board ft. If you were to call a mill they might be able to give you an average load size inbf but not linear.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

91 posts in 1754 days


#9 posted 05-03-2017 03:47 PM

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

662 posts in 1052 days


#10 posted 05-04-2017 10:20 PM



Hi Everyone,
How do I estimate how many 1 1/8” x 10 1/4” boards I would get from a truck load of logs?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

- Blair613

welp, if your logs are only 10” diameter, none

Knowing much much lumber is in a log is not an exact science.even if you had 24” diameter logs, the shape,taper, and defects in a log can effect its yield dramatically.

there are calculators to get an idea of BF in a log, but not sure if there are calcultors for certain dimensions.

View gargey's profile

gargey

862 posts in 609 days


#11 posted 05-04-2017 10:26 PM

If all the logs are 4” diameter, zero. If it’s one 10’ diameter log, and they only have to be two feet long each, then thousands of them. I.e. stupid question.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

662 posts in 1052 days


#12 posted 05-04-2017 10:33 PM

it would be nice to learn more about this load of logs,though

View Blair613's profile

Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#13 posted 05-04-2017 11:18 PM

Thanks Tomsteve.

View Blair613's profile

Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#14 posted 05-04-2017 11:23 PM

Hi GarGAY,
It’s pretty evident that nothing 10 inches wide could ever come from something 4” in diameter. Thanks for your opinion.

View Blair613's profile

Blair613

17 posts in 277 days


#15 posted 05-04-2017 11:29 PM

Hi again Tom,

I spoke to a sawmill and I was told that I need to order logs that are a minimum of 16” diameter. The truck that’s coming will carry 16 cords.

A guy with a portable mill told me that he would either charge $75/hr or .22 a board foot, whichever would be the cheapest for me when he arrives. How could $75/hr possibly be cheaper?

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