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220v Guage question.

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Forum topic by newbiewoodworker posted 11-08-2010 11:40 PM 2072 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


11-08-2010 11:40 PM

I was wondering what guage is required to run 220v maybe 10ff-20ft… I bought a welder, and of course, the breaker had to be 20amp… and the draw had to be 25amp…

So I am looking to run maybe 30amp a small distance away, at max, 20ft…

The current wire looks be be 14ga.. maybe.. will this support the service? Ill post a pic later…

Anyway, if I can avoid it, then I want to avoid electricians… if I have to tear out a helluva lot of wiring, then Ill suck it up, and pay the hundred or so…(or so probably… :( )

Why is it that stuff always goes wrong for ME! Anyway.. that really ticks me off… big time….

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."


18 replies so far

View ClayandNancy's profile

ClayandNancy

511 posts in 2475 days


#1 posted 11-08-2010 11:44 PM

12 gauge for 20 amp and 10 gauge for 30 amp. That,s what my electrician buddy did mine in.

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2508 days


#2 posted 11-08-2010 11:46 PM

I just wired my new shop.
I used 10 gauge.
It is very expensive!
I spent over $1200.00 just in wiring.

-- Bert

View CampD's profile

CampD

1473 posts in 2945 days


#3 posted 11-09-2010 12:13 AM

Copper is not cheap right now.
Any way, easiest way to wire for a welder is if the circiut panel is in the garage is to put a
30a 220v plug directly off the box and then make up an extension cord of 10-2 braided wire.
This way you can use it for any other 220v tool you may get in the future.

Edit: I also use this extension cord to bring generator power into the house, live in the mountians and we never know.

-- Doug...

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


#4 posted 11-09-2010 12:15 AM

Thats what I plan to do. Very close to the breaker…

I figure also, if I put a TS or something like that in, in the future, then I will need 220 as well…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


#5 posted 11-09-2010 12:57 AM

Update: Looks to be 12ga… So I guess electrician time… bugger

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Dandog's profile

Dandog

250 posts in 2234 days


#6 posted 11-09-2010 01:20 AM

newbiewoodworker what are you welding that you need all that power.I have been a welder as a trade for sometime now .maybe there is an other way to go.What kind of stuff do you want to weld ? I have a 110 mig flux core and can weld up to 1/2 ” steel if you bevel the matteral.

-- life an woodworking is one big experiment

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Manitario

2397 posts in 2342 days


#7 posted 11-09-2010 01:30 AM

as ClayandNancy said; 10 gauge for 30 amp. I did all the wiring myself for my garage; 3×20amp recepticles and 1×30amp, cost was about $150. Running a new circuit off the panel is fairly simple if you’ve done any electrical work before, otherwise best to pay someone. If you plan to have a bunch of tools in your garage in the future that will run at the same time (eg. TS and DC) you may want to consider having the electrician wire up a sub panel in your garage; will make it easier and probably cheaper in the future rather than running new lines from your house.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


#8 posted 11-09-2010 01:34 AM

Dandog: Its only a 110amp…. but, at el harbor fright, the only 120v is a 90amp flux, and I just went through 2 of them… junk… So I spent the 60bucks and upgraded to one that can take a cylinder too…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Dandog's profile

Dandog

250 posts in 2234 days


#9 posted 11-09-2010 01:54 AM

first in welding machines the name matters Miller or Lincoln is the BEST in the business.I have been welding for 15 years every fab shop i worked in uses one or the other.Now second in line is Hobart Hosfeld .the best is Licon for 110 flux an mig .I have never used harbor frate welder.I welded a bumper on a 4×4 no problems been over a year never herd from him, told him if it brakes or cracks bring it back.mine is a hosfeid.oh lincon flux core or mig start about 250 300 hund Homedepot. Craigslist is where i got mine.you can plug in anywhere ,your rite 120 stranded.

-- life an woodworking is one big experiment

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


#10 posted 11-09-2010 03:01 AM

Last I checked they are about 5-600 dollars at HD….

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Dandog's profile

Dandog

250 posts in 2234 days


#11 posted 11-09-2010 03:35 AM

newbiewoodworke
EBAY
Lincoln Electric 140 HD Weld Pak MIG Welder NIB

275 on ebay thats mig an flux all you need worth every penny
escription (From The Manufacturer)

Whether you have a home project, farm repairs or basic auto body welding to complete, the Weld-Pak 140HD should be at the top of your shopping list! Requiring common 120 volt input power, the Weld-Pak 140HD can be used almost anywhere. With simple two knob tapped control, the machine is easy to set up for gas-less flux-cored welding for deep penetration on thicker steel or gas-shielded MIG welding on thin gauge steel, stainless or aluminum. Compare the precise drive, rugged construction and full list of standard accessories…Lincoln® Weld-Pak is an excellent choice!

  • MIG weld 24 gauge up to 10 gauge (.135”) sheet metal in a single pass. Weld up to 5/16” steel using self-shielded Lincoln Innershield
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Lincoln Electric 140 HD Weld Pak MIG Welder NIB
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-- life an woodworking is one big experiment

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canadianchips

2341 posts in 2456 days


#12 posted 11-09-2010 04:06 AM

Couple things to consider.
The longer the distance from circuit box to welder , the more voltage drop you are going to have.
A solid wire will give you less voltage drop than braided wire. (An extension cord rolls up neater if it is braided wire).
Typically for every 50ft. distance add one guage thicker, your welder is rated for 12 gu. wire, consider 10 guage.
The more current you can get to your appliance the less heating will happen, especially motors. Overheating will shorten the life of the motor.
VERY IMPORTANT: Always check with your local electrician. No need for fires !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2286 days


#13 posted 11-09-2010 09:16 PM

One thing I cannot figure out: I was reading the manual last night before bed: The cord is 14guage… does this make sence?

Also, it says to use a twstlock plug… is this required?

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

527 posts in 2639 days


#14 posted 11-09-2010 11:50 PM

I think—- A 220/30A is twistlock…just the way they come. At least that’s all that was available for my table saw.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#15 posted 11-11-2010 07:26 AM

The cord can be what ever the manufacturer designs it to be. Electrical code does not apply. I have seen instances where a 14 ga wire was carrying a 4500watt load; nearly 41 amps at 110volts. This was nickel plated wire with silicone and glass insulation, but the point is it was not in violation of any electrical code. What you can run in a household circuit is another matter. Local codes can be stricter than national standards, but not the other way around. The national electrical code requires 14 ga for 15 amps, 12 ga for 20 amps, and 10 ga for 30 amps. Doesn’t matter if the voltage is 12 volts, 120 volts, 240 volts or 480 volts or even 13,200 volts. Amps is what determines the required guage of wire. The voltage does determine what insulation is required so it’s not a good idea to use automotive wire, rated for 12 volts on a circuit handling 240 volts, even if the guage is big enough to handle the amps.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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