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Convert 4" planer port to a 6" port?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 04-28-2017 04:34 AM 489 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


04-28-2017 04:34 AM

I have a 15” Jet planer with a 4” hood. I’ve been taking a look at converting the 4” hood to a 6”. Of course, Jet only offers 4”. And after researching, I see 99% modification to various sized planers with a 4” hood end result. I also have a 3HP Grizzly DC with 6” mains. I have been using the 4” planer port hooked to a 6”-4” reducer.
My question: since many modifications are done with 4” ports, would it be unwise to convert to 6”? If it is AOK to convert to 6”, I see I have to engineer something as only seen 1 modification I speak of but was done via HVAC shop, not a DIY.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter


14 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#1 posted 04-28-2017 05:45 AM

A picture of your 4” hood would help.

View Rrrandy's profile

Rrrandy

212 posts in 312 days


#2 posted 04-28-2017 06:18 AM

If I understand correctly you have a planer with a four inch dust port (pretty standard) converted to six inch feeding a six inch dust collector. What’s wrong with the current configuration?

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#3 posted 04-28-2017 11:05 AM

You will do just fine with a 6” port, though it may be somewhat louder (unless you have a spiral cutterhed). I converted my old Delta 22-540 (their first benchtop model) over to 6” bu chucking the OEM entirely and using a 6×4x12 HVAC right angle boot (I guess that’s what they’re called) and it work really well…no missed chips at all. My current planer is a Delta 15” and it has a 5” connection which I intend to enlarge to 6” this summer. But even the 5” is a big step up and this one lets an occasional chip past onto the feed table. My dc is an Oneida with a 5HP motor…..when you have enough DC you really increase the air flow going to the larger port.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


#4 posted 04-28-2017 01:11 PM

Ah thanks Fred. I have a 6” connection off my main 2’ away from planer so it just made sense to consider converting from 4” to 6” port, but rarely did I see anything mentioned of using a 6” port so it had me thinking maybe there was a reason.
Dan..here is picture from when I rebuilt the planer last year:

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2889 posts in 1822 days


#5 posted 04-28-2017 01:22 PM

In general, converting to a 6” port would be a good idea as it will increase the flow.

In my case, with a Jet 15” planer and a 4” port, I do not see any dust or chips escaping the planer. So, the question for me is if I make the conversion will it reduce the dust or chips escaping the planer. I do not think so probably because in my case, I am getting between 600-700 cfm with the 4” port. I suggest that people take a look at how well the 4” port is doing in their case and if a significant improvement can be made with a 6” port. Or, maybe, it might be easier to go to a 5” port.

With the numerous threads about 6” hose and increasing ports to 6”, I have looked at my tools to decide if making the change will be worth it.

I have a downdraft sanding table and it would be worthwhile to increase to a 6” port. On my cabinet saw, the 4” port to the cabinet is good but before the port I have 5” which splits off to the cabinet and then the over arm collection. On my saw and on others, the cabinet port connects to the area round the blade under the table so that you get the most such where you need it.

On my 16” bandsaw, the dust collection to the lower area works well with the 4” and pulls the dust from there. What I really need is not a larger port but to collect dust from just behind the blade and am working to put some kind of flex hose in that area that I can reposition. Just increasing the port to 6” will not do much in my case.

For my router table, the 4” port works fine.

There are so many threads which talk about pipe size and port size. As I have looked at my shop dust collection, I have found that the best improvements would come from how I collect at the tool and getting the dust as close to the source as possible. For example, I have tried a number of different things for my drill press where I drill and sand. None of them have worked as well as I would like and still trying things. The best has been using a 4” flex hose and position it for each operation.

Do not get me wrong as I understand the advantage of a larger pipe or port where it will help. All I am suggesting is that one evaluates what will make a difference and concentrate on those areas.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#6 posted 04-28-2017 01:32 PM

Redoak, with my DC I can’t get more than 550 CFM (measured) through a 4” port…....you must have a CV with a 16” impeller.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


#7 posted 04-28-2017 01:36 PM

Also of note, my 15” planer and 8” jointer are roughly 15-20’ away from my 3HP DC on 6” mains. A tad distant so I’m sure 4”->6” would help. With 4” port, I do have some chips on the bed after using the planer.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2889 posts in 1822 days


#8 posted 04-28-2017 03:08 PM

The question for me is if it is worth it to enlarge the port for a few chips. For me the answer is no.

I have 6” mains and blast gates and exactly the same Jet planer.

I have a 5 hp Oneida Super Dust Gorilla. However, I evaluate how my dust collector works with each tool and make adjustments based on need. I can and do measure flow for each set up and tool. I do this by measuring the static pressure and using the performance curve for my system.

I change ports only based upon actual performance.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1271 posts in 754 days


#9 posted 04-28-2017 04:13 PM

Holbs,

I agree that air flow would be increased by increasing the port size on the now 4” port-sized planer. I also believe that the cross sectional area of the dust port translates to air flow. The 4” port offers a cross sectional area of 12.6 square inches. Two 4” ports offer a total cross sectional area of 25.1 square inches. A 6” port would have a cross sectional area of 28.2 square increases. So if my belief is well founded, the existing 4” port is allowing 44% of the air flow compared to a 6” port and two 4” ports would represent 89% of the air flow of a 6” port.

In my case I added a second 4” port to my planer because it was easier, allowing me to use the manufacturers dust hood. The relative ease of this modification may explain why most of the modification you have found is the addition of a second 4” port.

If you modify the planer with a 6” port, eliminating a 90 degree transition elbow should improve air flow even a bit more. If a single 45 degree transition elbow is used, it should be a little less effective than no elbow but better than a 90 degree elbow.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#10 posted 04-28-2017 06:40 PM

From what I can see, you will need to manufacture a complete new hood to go to 6”. That hood is only about 4” high across the machine.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

898 posts in 1816 days


#11 posted 04-28-2017 07:37 PM

Why not just get a reducer at the port, you’ll see very little increase by expanding the whole thing, not to mention the time and cost to fabricate one that will work.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1721 posts in 1863 days


#12 posted 04-29-2017 12:41 AM

The more I look at it, the more time consuming it would be to convert the 4” port to 6”. At least, for right now. I was hoping for a easier way, a more economical way. Thanks guys for the input. I may revisit this idea soon again after research of the best angle (neutral outlet) and positioning of either 2×4” port or a single 6” ports only because, like Redoak, I have 6” mains and 6” blast gates that I feel I am under-utilizing with the 4” port. And, admittingly, getting a little burned out on dust collection since I’ve been doing that stuff for the last couple weeks :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2778 days


#13 posted 04-29-2017 12:58 AM

The elbow factor aside and considering how close it was indicated you could get to your goal with a six inch pipe, why could you not just punch another four inch hole in the top of the hood and attach a store bought connection?

View Roger's profile

Roger

20874 posts in 2638 days


#14 posted 04-30-2017 07:28 PM

Dust collection materials are a nightmare unless you want to spend a ga-zillion dollars on piping. Fab it up, it’ll work

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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