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HELP! Need a quick high gloss finish for a segmented vase

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Forum topic by AnthonyPants posted 04-28-2017 12:05 AM 1656 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AnthonyPants

5 posts in 277 days


04-28-2017 12:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: turning high gloss finish help

I am finishing up the sanding on my first turning project, an 11” segmented vase, and I can’t decide on a finish. I want a quick and easy high gloss finish. Doesn’t have to be durable the vase is just going to be a show piece. I dont have buffing wheels yet and can’t afford them right now.

I was thinking hut crystal clear but I’m worried the piece is too big as that finish drys so fast. would something like a couple coats of shellac and carnauba wax applied on the lathe and buffed out give a lasting high gloss?


14 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1847 days


#1 posted 04-28-2017 12:42 AM

What about a rattle-can spray lacquer?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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AnthonyPants

5 posts in 277 days


#2 posted 04-28-2017 12:50 AM

every lacquer finish I’ve seen turners do has been buffed out on buffing wheels. I’ve read carbauba wax leaves a really high gloss, can I apply that over lacquer? I’m worried about the friction heat it takes to melt the wax will mess up the lacquer

View telrite's profile

telrite

41 posts in 2135 days


#3 posted 04-28-2017 01:34 AM

this gives a nice shine and is real easy to use. I have found that you need to have the piece on the lathe, It is a friction type polish. It is the cream that I use
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=54188&cat=1,190,42950&ap=1
Al

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papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#4 posted 04-28-2017 01:38 AM

Spray on water based poly is high gloss and very fast drying.

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AnthonyPants

5 posts in 277 days


#5 posted 04-28-2017 01:41 AM

the ultra shine?


this gives a nice shine and is real easy to use. I have found that you need to have the piece on the lathe, It is a friction type polish. It is the cream that I use
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=54188&cat=1,190,42950&ap=1
Al

- telrite


View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

462 posts in 1141 days


#6 posted 04-28-2017 01:05 PM

I use Mylands on small items but like you said, it may dry too fast for large items.
The mix goes by lots of names but 1/3 shellac, 1/3 BLO, and 1/3 DNA should give you the shine you want.
For a glass like fninsh, after sanding burnish with 0000 steel wool. I even use steel wool to apply the first coat of finish since any small divot will really show up with a high gloss.
There are probably 50+ videos onyou tube showing it. OB’s shine juice.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taJbBmcaAZQ

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

409 posts in 580 days


#7 posted 04-28-2017 02:49 PM

I’ve played around with General Finishes WoodTurner’s Finish for small decorative bowls, and really like it. You can spray with a little airbrush detailer or wipe on with the lathe spinning (wiping thin coats dries fast enough to reapply in about 2-2.5 minutes). It builds and buffs pretty nicely.

Also, really, your first turning project?!? That vase looks great!

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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AnthonyPants

5 posts in 277 days


#8 posted 04-28-2017 04:05 PM

Thanks! I decided to pretty much go all in. I rather learn from messing up on a real project made from scraps than practice making spindle thing a that I’ll be very use lol

Can GF woodturners finish be buffed to a high shine?


I ve played around with General Finishes WoodTurner s Finish for small decorative bowls, and really like it. You can spray with a little airbrush detailer or wipe on with the lathe spinning (wiping thin coats dries fast enough to reapply in about 2-2.5 minutes). It builds and buffs pretty nicely.

Also, really, your first turning project?!? That vase looks great!

- Dustin


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Dustin

409 posts in 580 days


#9 posted 04-28-2017 06:44 PM

Anthony,
I got a pretty decent finish out of it when turning my first bowl (bloodwood), but after watching that video on OB’s Shine Juice, it looks like it does it even better. Plus, it’s cheap to make, and I’ve already got the stuff to do it, so I may be switching over myself. The GF finish is certainly nice and very durable, but a little pricey.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#10 posted 04-28-2017 07:00 PM

In time, shine juice will lose its shine.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View telrite's profile

telrite

41 posts in 2135 days


#11 posted 04-28-2017 11:00 PM



the ultra shine?

this gives a nice shine and is real easy to use. I have found that you need to have the piece on the lathe, It is a friction type polish. It is the cream that I use
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=54188&cat=1,190,42950&ap=1
Al
no the cream
- telrite

- AnthonyPants


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telrite

41 posts in 2135 days


#12 posted 04-28-2017 11:02 PM

the middle one in the picture

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2188 posts in 1974 days


#13 posted 04-29-2017 10:48 AM

I am big fan of lacquer or shellac finishes for items like your vase. Any high gloss lacquer brand sprayed, brushed or wiped on will do. Only secret to applying lacquer or shellac is light coats. I don’t always sand between coats before applying the next coat. I like to wet sand/polish lacquer with micro mesh to finish the finish may or may not wax. Shellac alone, sprayed, brushed or wiped on will also serve you well. I use mineral oil and super find sandpaper (anything over 400 grit) to finish the finish.

Like Jerry said most of your shellac mixture friction finishes will experience sheen fade back in time.

Lacquer & Shellac meld into previous coat of finish and cure faster than other finishes, but like other finishes temperature and humidity can affect final outcome, repairing is lot easier than other film finishes.

-- Bill

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OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#14 posted 05-01-2017 06:17 PM

Something like this?. Or this? Rattle can lacquer will work. Sand it back on the lathe, and polish out like car clear coat. Drill mounted 4” buff works, or just use a rag. Use the lathe to spin the work. For a show room finish I have far better results sanding back a film finish vs the various friction finishes.

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