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trouble with glaze...aka bar glaze

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Forum topic by brian88 posted 1384 days ago 744 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


1384 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: glaze table finish question refinish

Hello, I am rather new to lumberjocks and thought I would try to get some feedback on a particular dilemma I have. For Mothers day I built my wife a dining table out of maple with three african paduke squares set down the middle of the table. I then sprayed the table with poly then applied the glaze after about a month or so. The problem with the result that I have are: My grand daughter touched one area of the table during the curing process so there is a bumpy spot where that occurred. Also I don’t know how, but there is several pieces of “lint” in the finish. This was done in the dining room so I assumed would be a clean environment. The question I have is, what now? How do I fix this? Can I sand the top layer down and re-coat? Also I don’t really care for the gloss finish. Can a spray a coat of semi gloss or satin finish over the glaze?...any advice would be huge…Thanks

Brian

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."


13 replies so far

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2754 days


#1 posted 1384 days ago

Somewhat vague.
What products/brands did you actually use?
It makes a difference…

-- 温故知新

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#2 posted 1384 days ago

wow…another early bird…I wish I could remember the brand of the glaze, but I baught it from menards…the poly was just minwax clear satin…thank you for your input.

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4111 posts in 1483 days


#3 posted 1384 days ago

If you dont like the glaze.
Why not use steel wool and oil.
It will give it a satin finish.
Make sure the other finish is completely cured though. That can be weeks in some finishes.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#4 posted 1384 days ago

interesting idea…the finish has cured for well over 3 months and have just been afraid to look at it as I didnt know what to do…so this should work…can I rub the current finish and apply another coat of glaze to work out the bumps?

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

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Jamie Speirs

4111 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 1384 days ago

If you cut it back dry, yes.
If you use oil No.
When a finish goes wrong it is best to go back to the start.
Or at least to where the blemish is.
The wool & oil was a suggestion to take away the sheen and hide a blemish.
As it has been months it should be well cured.
jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#6 posted 1384 days ago

oh ok, Thanks Jamie…I am feeling much less anxious about this now…do you think that when I use the oil (what kind of oil by the way) this sheen will show less of the “lint” locked in the current glaze?...again…thanks…I love this site.

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4111 posts in 1483 days


#7 posted 1384 days ago

Have you a picture?
I would take it back past the lint. That may be back to the wood then you can be sure.
It is probably lint from your preparation.
It is important to use a tack cloth prior to putting a finish on.
Gloss finishes show up everything.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#8 posted 1384 days ago

ugh (head slap) yea I didnt do the tack cloth step….dang you “learning from my mistakes” procedure…here is a pic but doesnt show any of the detail..

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4111 posts in 1483 days


#9 posted 1384 days ago

Brian that is such a lovely table.
Take it back.
You will never be happy unless you do.
Then tack cloth and spray.
The table is WELL worth the extra work.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#10 posted 1384 days ago

ok…do you mean take it all the way back to the surface???oh boy…get the dust mask out…If that is what you suggest then that is what I will do…so here is the secrete…the paduke didn’t get set right in the table…I built the table then set the paduke in place(cutting out the holes in the already assembled table) as it was an after thought from my lovely bride and the setting wasn’t even so that is why I used the glaze to make the whole thing even….another learn from ones mistakes learning process…do you still suggest I go this route?

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4111 posts in 1483 days


#11 posted 1384 days ago

Brian wait a bit.
There are LJ’s that might have an easier sollution.
I’m sure there will be more answers when everyone gets on Line.
It is lunchtime here in Sunny Scotland and I know the time zones are different.
So wait a bit.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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brian88

108 posts in 1395 days


#12 posted 1384 days ago

oh wow…didn’t realise that…well its pretty early here in beautiful Minnesota…(eyes popped open at 430am)...thank you so much for your valuable input and time…I am delighted to meet someone such as yourself…

-- "thats all I have to say about that..."

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 2413 days


#13 posted 1383 days ago

I THINK what you have used is a 2 part epoxy. If so, you can sand it to remove the lint and bump, also making sure you dull any glossiness (check after tack ragging to make sure). The new coating will not penetrate catalyzed epoxy, so needs some “tooth” (microscopic roughness) to bite into to adhere. I would sand down to 320 grit, 400 max to keep as much clarity as possible in the surface. Use rougher in the flawed areas if necessary. Wet sanding is acceptable.

Then recoat with the finish of your choice, preferably an oil-based poly or phenolic varnish. For durability I would not use a water-based coating. I would use at least 2 coats of the semigloss or satin, using a thinned first coat (i.e. wipe-on or sprayed) to let it penetrate and grab the “teeth”. However, overcoating with poly or varnish will give a somewhat less durable finish than the catalyzed epoxy. Don’t go cheap on the topcoat. That table is way too pretty to use substandard coatings!

If you still have the container, or remember it saying things like methylethyl ketone, toluene, etc and it was two components mixed together, that was probably it. It also should have contained warnings about fumes and using respiratory protection, especially for 30 minutes after mixing, and should have said something about “stand-time” after mixing and before applying.

If it is a poured acrylic resin, you may have trouble getting a topcoat to adhere to it, even with sanding (you are basically trying to paint plastic.) It may work, but maybe someone more familiar with coating plastics can give more advice. In this case, the poly will be a more durable coating than the plastic resin. In theory, as long as it is clean and has some tooth to grab to, it should work well. If it said “water clean-up” etc, it was probably an acrylic.

If possible, try it on an underside or inside leg surface first if that is coated like the top, to see your results.

Go

PS: I used 2 and 3 part epoxies and polyurethanes in the aircraft industry, as well as painting boats, so know that recoating them is a common practice.

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

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