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Forum topic by Raftermonkey posted 11-07-2010 03:13 AM 981 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2375 days


11-07-2010 03:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip finishing shellac boiled linseed oil blo

Hey everybody, I just got a quick question for all you masters of finish application. Can I use a spray on shellac over a coat of boiled linseed oil?

Thanks,

Zeke

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"


5 replies so far

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#1 posted 11-07-2010 03:22 AM

Yes – but you need to give your oil at least 2- 3 WARM days to fully cure

Is shellac going to be your top coat, or is this just a seal coat?

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2375 days


#2 posted 11-07-2010 03:58 AM

Well, I was going to use it as a top coat but it is really just an experiment piece to see if I like the way it looks.
I have already put one coat of BLO on a natural edge mystery wood bowl and I was going to try it on that piece before I used it on a couple other natural edge bowls I will be turning and hand carving in the next few days. Thanks for the input.

Zeke

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#3 posted 11-08-2010 04:39 PM

Hey Zeke – Shellac is a great finish, easy to repair and has a nice patina to it. It isn’t so great for a dining room table top with kids, but carvings bowls, boxes etc it is great.

I asked the question because in many finish schedules, we would apply the oil, let it cure and then apply a Shellac sealcoat. Then go on to a a spray laquer or other fast building finish.

Just remember the oil needs oxygen to cure, so you do need to give it time to do its thing before you seal it in.
Cheers

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2375 days


#4 posted 11-08-2010 09:17 PM

Thanks Dave, you have been very helpful.

Zeke

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2375 days


#5 posted 11-08-2010 09:50 PM

Thanks Barry. While my turning a carving skills are improving, my finishing skills are not. I am nervous trying new things. I tend to stick with what I know, and know what the results will be. I am trying to make myself try different finishes but at the moment, all the blanks I’ve got have been bought so I really don’t want to experiment to much on those. Also, I should have been clear about this when I first posted this question, but I am not looking for a glossy finish. When I first started carving bowls I thought all of them had to be glossy to make them stand out. Now I am kinda wanting the wood to look more natural and let it speak for itself. Thanks for all the info guys. I will surely be referring back to this thread in the future.

Thanks,

Zeke

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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