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How is a carpenters slick used

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 11-07-2010 01:02 AM 4910 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


11-07-2010 01:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: carpenters slick

I saw this on ebay http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=300490202404&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1123

Anyone know how it is used?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


20 replies so far

View CampD's profile

CampD

1216 posts in 2237 days


#1 posted 11-07-2010 01:08 AM

Most Slicks are used to clean-up the pockets on Timber framing, BIG chissel!

-- Doug...

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TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#2 posted 11-07-2010 01:10 AM

Thanks for the info, The picture has a hook on the end. Do you hit it with a mallet?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1835 days


#3 posted 11-07-2010 01:10 AM

Usually a carpenters slick is a socketed large chisel used in timber framing. This is an odd puppy.

My first thought was a slaters tool to run up under shingles ant the bent end gives a good gripe to yank back nipping nails but it’s not quite sharpened that way and to thick.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

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CampD

1216 posts in 2237 days


#4 posted 11-07-2010 01:21 AM

Looks like a hand built one, oldie, maybe it had a handle at one time, who knows.
Slate shingle bars are usually long, wide and flat with the hook notched in.

-- Doug...

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6057 posts in 2180 days


#5 posted 11-07-2010 01:53 PM

The hook doesn’t look like it’s been beat on.
I don’t have a clue as to how it was used. I seriously doubt if it is a “slick”, though. One strong dude to push it through, or a VERY sharp blade.
I’d bid 20.00 just as a curiosity for the shop wall….....if mine wasn’t full of tools I actually use.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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canadianchips

1836 posts in 1748 days


#6 posted 11-07-2010 02:44 PM

This tool looks similsr to a tool I used for removing old floor tiles. When you lifted the tile there always seemed to be chunks that broke. My father made a thing similar to this to scrape the floor smooth to lay down new lino. (Back when people did not use a layer of sub-floor crap )

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1866 days


#7 posted 11-07-2010 02:52 PM

Topa here in Skandinavia we call them push axe (stødøkse or stikøkse)
here is a link to a very fine handmade swedish
http://www.thegoodstuffshop.dk/product.asp?product=18904

and a modern factory made

and a English type with a very long shaft

I know the last picture isn´t showing all of the shaft
they use them in timberframing and boatbuilders use them too
and you never use a mallet on them
you either make a hard push with all your body waight behind it
or you use it like a paring cheisel (you better learn the tecnic Topa ….LOL )
and I think thats how the english type is mostly used

take care
Dennis

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6057 posts in 2180 days


#8 posted 11-07-2010 04:41 PM

Hey Dennis,

Is that blue one used to split? And is it pushed rather than hit with a mallet?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5315 posts in 1549 days


#9 posted 11-07-2010 05:31 PM

I wouldn’t recognize that as a slick. I’m with CampD and JAGWAH on the use except in my case pockets for the ribs chopped in the keelson when framing larger wooden boats. You wouldn’t use a mallet on them. You chop first with a regular chisel and clean up by hand with a slick. Here’s mine.

The only photo I had has my adze in it as well.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1866 days


#10 posted 11-07-2010 05:42 PM

Gene
you never use a hammer or mallets on slicks
and normaly you don´t split with them :-)
you can on small pieces as you wuold do it with a cheisel
but I think a cheisel wuold be alot more safe to make toothsticks ….Dovels with

every one
here is a link to a site where you can see a slick and a gaugeslick is restored and rustproofed by Bob Smalser
http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/bSmalser/art/rustproofing/rustproofing1.asp

I think there has been made slicks from 2inch and up to 5inches wide
but had in mind they are dangerus to walk around with always ceep the edge protected
if not in use and if you do as B.Smalser does , its easy to remember

Take care
Dennis

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2954 posts in 1836 days


#11 posted 11-07-2010 06:14 PM

I first saw a slick in 1961, working with a older carpenter for Kaiser engineers on a slip forming crew (used a
4’ form on special hydraulic jacks fitted on pipes used as part of the rebar to pour a 150’ tall series of concrete
silos) He would use it as a finish plane and as a roughing out chisel for pockets. It was very sharp and he was
good. I have them from 7/8” to 2”. Some have a metal ring around the top of a shorter handle and can be
pounded on, others have a long handle and are meant to be used only with your hand and body muscle. You
can still buy them new from places like Cariboo Blades and Traditional Woodworker. Like any tool you have
to get used to them. Some people can adze closer than others can plane, me I just have to keep learning
and try to be careful.

As ever, Gus the 71 yr old laborer, trying to become a carpenters apprentice

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View wizzardofwood's profile

wizzardofwood

224 posts in 1621 days


#12 posted 11-07-2010 06:50 PM

the fellow who taught me woodworking used one to strip bark from logs before cutting and drying them looked just like that one

-- wizzardofwood..... "ITS MY JOB TO AMAZE YOU"

View CampD's profile

CampD

1216 posts in 2237 days


#13 posted 11-07-2010 06:59 PM

Wizzard! That sounds right, a cant hook and a slick in one, makes sence.

-- Doug...

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1866 days


#14 posted 11-07-2010 08:40 PM

bingo!! always a L J with the answer in the slieves
it never stop amazing me how much knowledge there is on this site :-)

Dennis

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#15 posted 11-07-2010 09:57 PM

Thanks for the responses :-) Mentioning some can adz closer than others plane reminds me of Grandpa taking a swipe on the lawn to check to see if his scythe was sharp enough :-)) I’m kind of glad I never got that good with a scythe!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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