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Forum topic by Russell posted 02-09-2008 06:20 AM 2003 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Russell

4 posts in 3982 days


02-09-2008 06:20 AM

Can I put a dewaxed shellac between my stain and an oil based polyurathane? If so what cut of shellac should I use? Is it true that by putting a coat of shellac down before the poly will help to bring out the grain pattern. By the way the wood is oak. Thank you!

Russ

-- Russ, Williamsport, Pa


8 replies so far

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1780 posts in 4264 days


#1 posted 02-09-2008 06:45 AM

Yes you should actually. It will help with adhesion and should prevent bleeding of the stain. Let the stain dry completely. You can use the dewaxed shellac out of the can (Zinzer seal coat) or cut it to make application easier.

Sand the shellac finish down very lightly with 320 or greater. 0000 steel wool would work too.

I don’t know about bringing out the grain, but it will add some color (amber).
What is the project?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

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jcees

1070 posts in 3973 days


#2 posted 02-09-2008 09:29 AM

I believe shellac is God’s way of telling us he loves us doing woodwork. That bug excretion is the original all purpose hard finish. And as Giz stated, yes, you should put down a coat of it between your stain and poly. Zinsser’s SealCoat is already a two pound cut and can be used for your purpose straight from the can. It is dewaxed blonde and has a guaranteed shelf life of three years. Something mixing your own will never achieve. I love the stuff. I tint it with TransTint dyes and also use it straight. As far as bringing out the grain pattern on oak, well, you’d have to try and hide the grain on oak, it’s there whether you want it or not. However, any finish will somewhat enhance the grain.

My current finish schedule for the woodwork in my house goes like this; water based dye stain, shellac with amber tint, two to three coats of gloss poly either sprayed, wiped or brushed and Viola!

I also scuff sand before and between each coat of poly as it has to have a “tooth” to grab in order for it to adhere to anything. Do that and you shouldn’t experience any adhesion problems whatsoever.

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 4048 days


#3 posted 02-09-2008 11:49 AM

I am a big shellac fan, too. Great sealer, easy clean-up, non-toxic, what’s not to like?

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 3996 days


#4 posted 02-09-2008 02:05 PM

Ditto all of the above. I use the Zinsser’s product, and I am sure purists will scoff, but like J.C. really like it as a sealer for the stain coat. I generally use the the amber product as this gives nice warm coloring. Followed by several coats of wipe on poly makes for a nice finish.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4136 days


#5 posted 02-09-2008 02:14 PM

I use clear and amber. I quit buying SealCoat because I can cut the 3 lb. with alcohol and have the same thing. I use it under poly by sanding with 220 paper between coats. If I use dye stain, I shellac after the dye and then use gel stain for a glaze then another coat of shellac then sand then wipe on poly. I sand between coats of poly and usually do 3 to 5 coats of 75% MinWax Quick Dry and 25% mineral spirits. this seems to get a good build of finish. I doubt the poly will stick if you don’t sand.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 3996 days


#6 posted 02-09-2008 03:11 PM

One more point I would like to add to Thos. Angle post is that he is correct about the poly bonding to subsequent layers. Poly adheres by means of mechanical bonds created when the surface is roughed up from sanding. Shellac bonds by partially dissolving the underlying coat.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View jeremy's profile

jeremy

53 posts in 3953 days


#7 posted 02-09-2008 03:39 PM

It’s funny, because if you read the back of the lable on shellac it says that it’s NOT recommended to apply oil based poly over shellac. I do it and everybody else seems to do it. I’m wondering if anyone here knows why they say not to do it.

-- Jeremy, Saratoga, NY

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1780 posts in 4264 days


#8 posted 02-09-2008 03:54 PM

I have read that the top coat of poly can separate eventually when using standard shellac. Poor adhesion. I have heard many like Thos. have no problem with it though.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

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