LumberJocks

18 volt batteries

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Eloyd posted 04-25-2017 07:46 AM 468 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Eloyd's profile

Eloyd

17 posts in 1234 days


04-25-2017 07:46 AM

Topic tags/keywords: i have a bosch 18 volt 4 tool kit they dont work as well as they once did so i thought that i might buy a new set maybe a lithium ion set then i saw the price so i thought that i might buy new 18 volt batteries for my set as i was looking online i see that there is one 18v 15 ah and there is another 18v 30 ah what is the difference what does the ah mean does one charge faster or hold charge longer than the other

I have a Bosch 18 volt 4 tool kit. They don’t work as well as they once did. So I thought that I might buy a new set, maybe a lithium Ion set. Then I saw the price. So I thought that I might buy new 18 volt batteries for my set. As I was looking online I see that there is one 18v 1.5 Ah, and there is another 18v 3.0 Ah. What is the difference? What does the Ah mean? Does one charge faster or hold charge longer than the other?

-- Eloyd


10 replies so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4544 posts in 2044 days


#1 posted 04-25-2017 07:57 AM

Lithium well worth the cost, you will be impressed with the weight/mass reduction and improvement in performce

Ah is ampre hours or if you were a train then horsepower is a equilavent rating.
So 18V 3.0 Ah is twice as powerfull as a 1.5 Ah battery and again well worth the cost.

Make sure they are both physically and charger compatable to your existing suite.

-- Regards Robert

View OhioMike's profile

OhioMike

79 posts in 2002 days


#2 posted 04-25-2017 08:29 AM

Ah means Amp Hours. It’s a measure of the battery’s storage capacity.

When fully charged, a 3Ah battery will let you drill twice as many holes as a 1.5Ah battery.

When I buy NiCads I prefer the smaller batteries such as the 1.5Ah. They cost less and they aren’t as heavy. True, they will only last half as long as the 3Ah batteries but I’m just a few steps away from a charger while working in my shop.

If I were a carpenter working on a scaffold 20 feet in the air where a dead battery means a trip back to the truck, I’d go for the 3Ah.

Mike

View htl's profile

htl

3173 posts in 999 days


#3 posted 04-25-2017 10:12 AM

What OhioMike said.
Love the 1.5 around the shop with my arthritis but get me off some where and that bigger heaver battery really comes in to play.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

40 posts in 960 days


#4 posted 04-25-2017 11:14 AM



Lithium well worth the cost, you will be impressed with the weight/mass reduction and improvement in performce

Ah is ampre hours or if you were a train then horsepower is a equilavent rating.
So 18V 3.0 Ah is twice as powerfull as a 1.5 Ah battery and again well worth the cost.

Make sure they are both physically and charger compatable to your existing suite.

- robscastle


Agree that lithium are worth it. Also yes AH means ampere hours. It is not equivalent to horsepower though. It is more like size of the fuel tank.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1010 posts in 2124 days


#5 posted 04-25-2017 12:36 PM


It is not equivalent to horsepower though. It is more like size of the fuel tank.

- PeteStaehling

Very good analogy.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View JayT's profile

JayT

5455 posts in 2051 days


#6 posted 04-25-2017 12:49 PM

Another option you might consider is having your current batteries rebuilt. The battery shell is opened the old cells are removed and new cells are soldered in. Usually costs about half what a new battery does and performance is improved, due to the improvements in technology in the new cells. Won’t get you all the benefits of Lithium-Ion, but will get you back up and running at a much lower cost. Probably just have to do a Google search to see if someone in your area does that kind of service.

If you do decide to replace the batteries with Lithium-Ion, you might also need to replace the charger. You’d have to check to see if your current charger model is compatible with Lithium-Ion batteries.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View pontic's profile

pontic

505 posts in 448 days


#7 posted 04-25-2017 12:58 PM

Lead acid, Ni cad, Lithium all oxidize at the positive plates eventually. The more you use them the more they oxidize. and the less AH they hold. You can recondition a lead acid and a NiCad battery. Harder to recondition a Lithium one.
Phillips and Seimans both make a propritery reconditioning circuit for Ni Cad batteries. Sadly they are no longer available for the average homeowner’s tools. Since the major manufactures decided to switch to lithium. I have a Seimans reconditioning circuit I modified from one of the curing light chargers that was in my dental office. I connected it to my DeWalt unit. This has revitalized my Ni cads and kept their Ampacity and AH up much longer than they usually do. Don’t think the Big boy manufactures are going to put one in their chargers because they want you to buy Lithium. Just my $.02

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2612 posts in 2136 days


#8 posted 04-25-2017 01:26 PM

I’d investigate if there is an adapter available to use the LiOn batteries in your old tool like Dewalt offers. This looks like a home brewed version:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPeTrth-7SA

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116592 posts in 3417 days


#9 posted 04-25-2017 01:34 PM

Eloyd
I’ve found that the replacement batteries (I assume China made) are far less expensive than brand names an have worked very well for me.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N2HLT1I?psc=1

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2565 posts in 1865 days


#10 posted 04-25-2017 10:04 PM

It doesn’t make sense to me, but often you can get batteries cheaper by buying a whole new set of tools which includes batteries and charger. This is certainly true with Ryobi, except that sometimes they have their batteries on sale.
Seems sort of wasteful, but you can then have a drill or driver in each hand. More efficient that way, maybe.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com