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balancing between centers

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Forum topic by Karda posted 04-24-2017 11:42 PM 631 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


04-24-2017 11:42 PM

I was give a chunk of fire wood to turn. I trimmed as much of the pith as I could. How do I find the center of this , here are pics of the ends.


21 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

170 posts in 1308 days


#1 posted 04-25-2017 12:17 AM

Not to be snarky, but why do you need to? Will you be turning this into a spindle of some sort? Since it doesn’t look like the piece’s sides are parallel or straight, even if you could find the exact center of both ends, the piece would likely not be parallel to the ways when you mount it.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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MrUnix

5983 posts in 2033 days


#2 posted 04-25-2017 12:19 AM

For a piece like that, the center is where you eyeball it. Once turned round, the centers will be, by definition, dead center.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#3 posted 04-25-2017 12:29 AM

yes but it will be very of balance, the first pice I mounted was bigger than that but fairly uniform but curved a little, it hrew of as soon as I turned the lathe on, I face plate mounted that one. I had to block the end of the lathe. I don’t want to do any damage to the lathe or me. and when a machine mack a hell of a lot of noise it shouldn’t make it scares the hell out of me.

View jonnybrophy's profile

jonnybrophy

160 posts in 446 days


#4 posted 04-25-2017 12:30 AM

A lil bit down, a lil to the right
you’ll be fine

(i agree, just eyeball it, You could put a bubble level on top if the piece is long, but that wont really help much either)

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

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MrUnix

5983 posts in 2033 days


#5 posted 04-25-2017 12:31 AM

it hrew of as soon as I turned the lathe on, I face plate mounted that one.

Then you didn’t have enough pressure being used on the tailstock.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 446 days


#6 posted 04-25-2017 12:33 AM

Do you have any hand planes?
Trim off where you think there is too much weigh/off center.
I agree it is super scary when the lathe starts jumping.

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10610 posts in 2214 days


#7 posted 04-25-2017 12:59 AM

Tighten it down like you don’t want it to ever come off, then check it every few minutes because it will loosen.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#8 posted 04-25-2017 01:00 AM

ok, i’ll see what I can trim as well thanks

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

458 posts in 1136 days


#9 posted 04-25-2017 01:04 AM

This method works the same with spindle orientation. Trim with a hatchet to eyeballed round.
Mount between centers; note the spurs at the headstock are not engaged so the log can rotate (heavy side down).
Adjust then set the spur drive and tighten.
You will probably want to stop and move the centers a few times as the weight changes.
I just trued up about 12 5” cherry blanks that had been drying about two years and adjusted the center at least once on each one.
Start slow and be safe. Very sharp tool helps a lot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4xIHTS0yJc

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Karda's profile

Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#10 posted 04-25-2017 01:19 AM

thanks for the video, I’ll try that

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#11 posted 04-25-2017 03:08 AM

Are you starting off with support from the tail stock. If not, do, until you got your happy round. Since it’s “between centers,” I guess so, so – slow down.

Looking at your photo, you could have altered balance by moving more to the right-ish. Use your tape and make a gob of half measurements and you should be within a half inch or so.

All the foregoing aside, you have just justified a band saw. ;)

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#12 posted 04-25-2017 03:23 AM

I supported with both centers just not tight enough, I did measure after the paint dried and got I thing pretty close to center. I have a new band saw that would cut that piece but when I tried to rip it the saw didn’t cut to good. I think the blade is to fine to rip it so I used the table saw

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#13 posted 04-25-2017 04:26 AM

Mike, I wish you were closer to one of us so we could get together and show you how to do things.

View Karda's profile

Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#14 posted 04-25-2017 05:16 AM

yea I do too, but you all have been a great help, This is quite a learning experience

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#15 posted 04-25-2017 06:03 AM

You should be running about a 3 TPI blade, regardless of width.

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