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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 11-05-2010 04:28 AM 1444 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


11-05-2010 04:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: stanley 3 4 shooting board

Is a Stanley #3 or 4 suitable for use on a shooting board?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


17 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1500 days


#1 posted 11-05-2010 04:33 AM

Depends on the material you are jointing. Condition of your iron obviously would be a factor as well. For the short answer, I would have to say no. A # 5 would be a much better choice. JB

View SouthpawCA's profile

SouthpawCA

254 posts in 1924 days


#2 posted 11-05-2010 04:37 AM

I’ve done shooting with a Jack plane (preferred) and even a small bench plane. Both with excellent results. However, it all depends on your plane. Is it flat and square? If so, you’re good to go.

-- Don

View Mario's profile

Mario

106 posts in 2087 days


#3 posted 11-05-2010 04:37 AM

As long as the sole is flat and square to the sides you should have no problem with either one. I carry a small portable shooting board on my toolbag along with a Veritas apron plane (a small block plane) and it works like a charm everytime.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#4 posted 11-05-2010 04:48 AM

I am thinking of tuning up some old planes and was wondering if I could dedicate the smaller ones to the shooting board. I was thinking the #5 would be more of a scrubber to take the worst off before final smoothing. Is a #5 being used like that going to be good enough to make perfect joints? Am I thinking my jack plane will be rougher than it should be?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Mario's profile

Mario

106 posts in 2087 days


#5 posted 11-05-2010 05:10 AM

I would say that your #5 can definitely take out a bigger bite than your #3 or 4 but if your blade is sharp and sole is flat there is no reason why you shouldn´t be able to use it for smoothing or fine tuning your work, that wide range of use is basically the appeal of the jack plane.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1663 days


#6 posted 11-05-2010 05:27 AM

Configuring a jack to shoot would work just fine. The only pain is then having to reconfigure it when you want it to run coarse. You can get by with just the depth adjuster, but usually will require a change in setting of the frog and the chip breaker. So it becomes a bit of a hassle for constant switching back and forth. Better to have two :)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#7 posted 11-05-2010 07:14 AM

Beginning to wonder if I’ll ever get planes figured out and up and running :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View studie's profile

studie

618 posts in 1837 days


#8 posted 11-05-2010 07:41 AM

Was the “coffee lounge” a shooting board? LOL I have yet to use a shooting board other than a make shift one at the job site, they look to be a valuable tool though. I’m working a lot lately but want to make one or two. Could you come over & let’s make a few for gifts? How about a really big one for timber framing?

-- $tudie

View Lochlainn1066's profile

Lochlainn1066

138 posts in 1468 days


#9 posted 11-05-2010 07:47 AM

There is no reason you can’t adjust a jack as fine as a smoother. Both the #4 and #5 have the same adjustments and dimensions.

The solution to the hassle of switching back and forth is to buy a dedicated shooting plane. I find #5’s and other mfr’s equivalents all the time for around $12 at antique stores. Any style will do so long as it is a decent brand.

My first jack was a $12.50 Keen Kutter K5… with the bedrock style bed. Surprisingly while I find #5’s and #3’s everywhere, #4’s are proving to be rare around here.

-- Nate, thegaragestudio.etsy.com

View RalphBarker's profile

RalphBarker

80 posts in 1460 days


#10 posted 11-05-2010 08:24 AM

My experience is similar to those reflected in the other comments. I would add, however, that with harder woods, having a bit more weight in the plane makes it easier. I’ve used a #4 and a #7, but currently I’m using a low-angle #5 (LN with their “hot dog” attachment).

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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#11 posted 11-05-2010 08:37 AM

Hey Studie, Long time no see:-(( we can make a timber framing shooting board. You get the blade in the frame, I’ll bring the tractor over to push it ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#12 posted 11-05-2010 08:43 AM

Sounds like I may use a 4 for shooting and the jack as a jack. Once I get them set up, I won’t want to be undoing it until I figure out what the heck I’m doing if I get that far :-))

When would a #3 be called for? The plane descriptions talk about a small smoother, but in practical terms, when do you plane users use them or do you even bother with a 3?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View RalphBarker's profile

RalphBarker

80 posts in 1460 days


#13 posted 11-05-2010 04:54 PM

”When would a #3 be called for?”

Small smoothers (#3) can be useful if you have small hands. Otherwise, they tend to be hard to grip. But, they are cute and nice to look at, particularly if bronze. ;-)

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1797 days


#14 posted 11-05-2010 05:17 PM

If the edge of the board is already strait, and you just want to square up the edge, I should think the #4 would be fine. If you are both trying to straiten the edge and square the edge at the same time, then a #5, but I think straitening and then squaring is easier.

Personally, I prefer using a aux fence in a vice instead of a shooting board. I find it much easier, especially with the metal hand planes (vs. wooden hand planes.)

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1689 days


#15 posted 11-05-2010 05:50 PM

As far as the size, it doesn’t make any difference what you use with a shooting board. The edge of the board guides the blade and not the sole. The thing you might want to consider is a low angle plane for the shooting board. You will mainly be going against end grain. A little block plane would work fine on a shooting board but the only real drawback is that you don’t have much to hang on to.

As far as what you use for a smoother size, it is hand size and blade width that will matter most. Some people like a smaller #3, some might want to go up to a #4-1/2. I prefer my #5-1/2 for a jack to a #5. It just fits better.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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