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How many use a shooting board regularly

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Forum topic by Manitario posted 04-24-2017 02:21 AM 983 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Manitario

2506 posts in 2661 days


04-24-2017 02:21 AM

My last several projects have involved long, wide boards for casework. I find it really difficult to get precise 90 degree crosscuts on my mitre saw despite a lot of effort to tune it, and cross-cutting 8ft long boards on the tablesaw, even with a large cross cut sled is very difficult. I imagine that wide boards used to get cut by hand and then trued up on a shooting board. I’ve also heard of people rough cutting boards on their MS or TS and then using a shooting board to get a perfect 90 degrees.

How many people use a shooting board for wide boards? I’ve seen most of the use for small pieces and/or mitres eg. picture frames.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil


18 replies so far

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2660 posts in 1259 days


#1 posted 04-24-2017 01:14 PM

For wide boards I don’t use a shooting board for anything over 5”. Plus its very difficult physcally.

If the board is wide treat just like you’re jointing it. I use a #6.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

308 posts in 218 days


#2 posted 04-24-2017 01:51 PM

I use a jointer plane in these instances and if I really want to be sure I am getting the cut close to 90 I grab a No 7 that has a jointer fence attached. I usually can get fairly close freehand with a jointer plane.
Mostly have used a shooting board for small(-ish) pieces.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4098 posts in 2943 days


#3 posted 04-24-2017 04:14 PM

I haven’t run into the problem, yet, but then again, I don’t usually make large objects. My RAS will go to 14.5”, and with occasional tuning, will cut a perfect 90 degree, thankfully. You might be able to pick up a used one cheap, if that would help. However, the proper plane should work, as per the above posts.

Interestingly, I was thinking about making a shooting board just recently, but other urgent projects have kept me busy.

Spring finally arriving here, long hard winter. Last year Spring was a month earlier.

Have a good day.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

847 posts in 1683 days


#4 posted 04-24-2017 04:42 PM

I use a crosscut sled that I calibrated using the five cut method. See the Wood Whisperer’s video about that for some good suggestions. I wouldn’t shoot anything that wide. My crosscut sled is close enough to perfectly perpendicular that I don’t worry about it. It’s only a few thousandths off over a long run. I very rarely use my miter saw for precision angles.
I haven’t needed to use a shooting board, but I could envision a situation when it would be useful to have one. I just don’t think I’d shoot anything super wide.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5409 posts in 1989 days


#5 posted 04-24-2017 04:57 PM

I use a shooting board and plane regularly. My board will only do up to maybe 6 inch wide stock easily, though I’ve done a couple 8 inch pieces in the past. It wouldn’t be that hard to make a board that is capable of shooting wider stock, if that is what is needed.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

346 posts in 3747 days


#6 posted 04-24-2017 05:07 PM

You can use your bench to shoot.

Here I am match planing two 1/4” panels together. They are weighed down to keep them flat. A #7 jointer is used …

More here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/OneStepBack.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View viseone's profile

viseone

12 posts in 184 days


#7 posted 04-25-2017 01:25 PM

I use a shooting board for under 6” long pieces. For longer ones I use my bench and a jointer plane.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14723 posts in 2397 days


#8 posted 04-25-2017 01:39 PM

The OP asked about wide pieces and shooting end grain, but so many responses are about jointing edges of long boards…

I’m not sure why shooting wide boards would be a problem up to, maybe, 8” or so with normal shooting boards. It requires a second board at the other end of the bench, to hold the piece parallel to bench top, but other than that shouldn’t pose a huge issue for as often as it might be required. If boards are typically wider than that, might need a bigger shoot board.

Do I shoot wide boards? No. RAS does a great job with those cuts.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7917 posts in 1264 days


#9 posted 04-25-2017 02:37 PM

I don’t hesitate shooting wider stock as I made mine big 16”ish. Have only used half the capacity but I would if I needed to.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4098 posts in 2943 days


#10 posted 04-25-2017 03:10 PM

Oh, and as per MrFid, my super sled has a 25” capacity, so takes care of crosscuts on panels up to that size. For bigger panels, I have a rather gigantic panel sled with a front fence. My nemesis is the wide and long stuff, and that is always tough.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

308 posts in 218 days


#11 posted 04-25-2017 03:51 PM

Do you have a circular saw? Not always but sometimes, I will use a circular saw against a guide to get a fairly close 90 degree endcut. It’s not the best method, but if for some reason your mitre saw just won’t do it, then there would be that option.


My last several projects have involved long, wide boards for casework.
- Manitario

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

346 posts in 3747 days


#12 posted 04-25-2017 04:01 PM

Ok, I demonstrated the way to joint a long edge. However, shooting a wide crosscut is no different. You need to knife in the square, and then plane to it – use a jointer plane exactly as I have shown. What the knifed lines. A little here and a little there.

Using tablesaws (I have an “accurate” sliding table), crosscut sled, mitre saw … none of these is accurate enough … anyway, they are not for the OP – not much point in saying what power tools work for you when he is asking how to use a handplane.

Woodworking is about working to a line.It is not diffrent in this case, just at the ends of the board.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1828 posts in 719 days


#13 posted 04-25-2017 04:16 PM



You can use your bench to shoot.

Here I am match planing two 1/4” panels together. They are weighed down to keep them flat. A #7 jointer is used …

More here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/OneStepBack.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

- Derek Cohen


I’m sure it works just fine and you’re careful, but those bricks near those nice sharp bench tools give me the heebie jeebies :O How about using cauls?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

847 posts in 1683 days


#14 posted 04-25-2017 04:55 PM


Oh, and as per MrFid, my super sled has a 25” capacity, so takes care of crosscuts on panels up to that size. For bigger panels, I have a rather gigantic panel sled with a front fence. My nemesis is the wide and long stuff, and that is always tough.

- Jim Bertelson

That’s about the capacity of mine as well.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2506 posts in 2661 days


#15 posted 04-25-2017 05:31 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone. It sounds like most people have a good enough setup with their MS/RAS/TS to not have to shoot wide boards. It tempts me to look at different MS, have also been kicking around getting a big RAS (would be nice with some of the large slabs I cut). I have a large TS sled but as Jim said, the wide, long stuff is really difficult to cut this way. Sounds like in theory that shooting endgrain on wide boards could be done with the right setup but maybe not the most practical.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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