LumberJocks

Resin Epoxy table questions

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Medici posted 04-23-2017 03:31 AM 478 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Medici's profile

Medici

45 posts in 415 days


04-23-2017 03:31 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cherry shaping milling finishing joining arts and crafts rustic modern traditional question

Hey guys.

I can’t seem to find any good articles or info that actually goes into detail on epoxy tables – I’m talking large amounts of epoxy within a table; epoxy casting. I want to build a table with some old broken pieces of cherry + resin, in the style of the Greg Klassen tables, but with epoxy. Most articles just describe filling holes & cracks with small amounts of epoxy.

Idea of what I’m doing, minus the color (random picture off of google):

I know that I can build a mold out of melamine + 3mil plastic so I’m not worried about that – But I’m curious as to just how much resin/hardener that I will need, because I don’t have a sq ft. amount since it may vary.

Is there any good articles that someone can point me towards to look into this?

Thanks!


8 replies so far

View Lefley's profile

Lefley

22 posts in 344 days


#1 posted 04-23-2017 04:00 AM

I

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

201 posts in 453 days


#2 posted 04-23-2017 01:48 PM

I would estimate the dimensions of the gap. LxWxH=Volume, then do a conversion to liquid. Add 10% for drips, miscalculations, other surprises.

The pictured gap looks to be about 72” X 4” X 1.25” = 360 cubic inches. One cubic inch is equal to 0.5541126 ounces. 360 X 0.5541126 = 200 oz + 10% = 220 oz. There are 64 oz. in a gallon so you’ll need about 3.5 gallons of mixed resin to fill that gap.

-- Sawdust Maker

View oldsailor59's profile

oldsailor59

51 posts in 264 days


#3 posted 04-23-2017 01:59 PM

this was helpful for me http://eastcoastresin.com/p/instruction and http://www.raka.com/manual.html. I am still looking for a good article/video on how to use epoxy to finish a table top. most just show folks pouring the resin on then the project being done. the top I am working on has random low spots, I try to fill them but just create more low spots. feels like digging a hole at the beach.

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

View Medici's profile

Medici

45 posts in 415 days


#4 posted 04-23-2017 02:07 PM


I would estimate the dimensions of the gap. LxWxH=Volume, then do a conversion to liquid. Add 10% for drips, miscalculations, other surprises.

The pictured gap looks to be about 72” X 4” X 1.25” = 360 cubic inches. One cubic inch is equal to 0.5541126 ounces. 360 X 0.5541126 = 200 oz + 10% = 220 oz. There are 64 oz. in a gallon so you ll need about 3.5 gallons of mixed resin to fill that gap.

- Dan Hulbert

This us very helpful, i appreciate it; however, your calculations are off. There are 128 fl. oz. in a gallon. :)

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

201 posts in 453 days


#5 posted 04-23-2017 02:11 PM

Oops. Seemed a bit much when I did the original post.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Medici's profile

Medici

45 posts in 415 days


#6 posted 04-23-2017 02:34 PM



Oops. Seemed a bit much when I did the original post.

- Dan Hulbert

That’s cool. I really appreciate it. One other thing – I see people adding the epoxy little by little; like a plastic cups worth at a time, while blow torching out bubbles between pours. Is this the safest method to ensure a clear cast is made? & will epoxy adhere to epoxy?

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1185 posts in 416 days


#7 posted 04-23-2017 04:44 PM

Epoxy is exothermic when curing. If you’re doing a large volume all at once, the heat generated by the curing can cause degradation of the epoxy, and depending on your wood, could damage that. Or possibly start a fire (though I’ve never heard of that). Mostly I think the worry is damaging the epoxy you just poured as it cures. Thin layers will give each layer a chance to cool before you pour the next one.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2558 posts in 1859 days


#8 posted 04-24-2017 04:03 AM

Oddly enough, epoxy doesn’t seem to adhere that well to itself. It is usually recommended to sand between coats. But whether that would hold true in a large pour like that I can’t say.

As Dave of Minneapolis says, large batches (even one cup) of mix can get very hot. And I have heard of it catching fire, though I’ve never seen it. Spreading a pour out lets it dissipate the heat.

It’s common in wooden kayaks to pour epoxy into each end of the boat. The end of the boat is set into a bucket of water to keep the heat under control.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com