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Forum topic by Pabs posted 11-04-2010 06:43 PM 3261 views 0 times favorited 58 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

175 posts in 2208 days


11-04-2010 06:43 PM

my workshop (20 by 24) is an attached garage… and is not heated at the moment.
looking at different options… I have my old construction heater from my previous shop (you know the small square box, element in the back and a fan in front of it). works well enough but was wondering if that’s an efficient way to heat a shop?

I will only really heat the place when I go in there to work at night and when I’m gluing a piece I’ll leave the heat on overnight…other than that it would go unheated

how do you guys heat your shops? what’s the most efficient in terms of power usage, has to be safe for a dusty workshop too

thanks in advance!

-- Pabs


58 replies so far

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2776 days


#1 posted 11-04-2010 06:51 PM

We dont know where you are Pabs?

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3997 posts in 2417 days


#2 posted 11-04-2010 06:57 PM

I have a Fahrenheat 5000 Watt Unit Heater (review at: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/1161 ) ... it does a great job.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1928 days


#3 posted 11-04-2010 06:59 PM

I’ve heard GREAT things about the Modine Hot Dawg

95% sure this is what my brother uses in HIS 3-car garage/shop, with … about 18’ ceilings. Works beautifully.

-- -- Neil

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1584 days


#4 posted 11-04-2010 07:03 PM

You may want to call a few local heating contractors and pick their brains. Maybe one of them will have some used unit they would give you a deal on. Different locals, building type, # of windows & doors, utility availability, ceiling height, insulation values, etc. all all factors to consider when designing a system to work as you would like. Such as recovery time when a garage door is opened, warm up time after a few days shut down, or if you have items that need freeze protection during shut downs. Give some more specifics and see what LJs can suggest.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2208 days


#5 posted 11-04-2010 07:04 PM

I’m in New Brunswick Canada….so winters get cold enough!

-- Pabs

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#6 posted 11-04-2010 07:04 PM

Not to hammer on an old subject now, but no matter how much heat you throw at a space, if it leaks air and gains / loses heat, you are going to spend a fortune on heating / cooling it. You REALLY need to stop the drafts and insulate that space. Without doing that you might as well just put a fire pit in and burn cash to heat your shop.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1928 days


#7 posted 11-04-2010 07:07 PM

To dbhost’s point….

Yesterday, I spent 45 minutes putting Prodex insulation on my garage door.

The door faces South. When I started, the sun on the door made it HOT, where I stood.

When I finished, the air behind the newly insulated door was COOL (no. The clouds had not come in!).

So … I couldn’t agree more, AND … I like the Prodex. Verrrrry easy intallation.

-- -- Neil

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Manitario

2378 posts in 1637 days


#8 posted 11-04-2010 07:12 PM

I live in Thunder Bay and I’m hoping to get by with a 4800W heater this winter for my 21×13 garage; the walls are uninsulated but the ceiling and garage door are insulated. So far it has done a good job keeping the space toasty when it has been dipping below zero at night, but I’m not holding out hope for when it goes down to -30….

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#9 posted 11-04-2010 07:15 PM

I have both my garage doors done with 2 layers of Rmax 3/4” with reflective sides in and out so that it is shiny side, foam dull side, dull side foam shiny side, and a total of R10. My walls are next I need to get a contractor to do blown in insulation…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2776 days


#10 posted 11-04-2010 07:16 PM

I used 6” rock wool insulaltion in my place R-22 floor, walls and ceiling.
I could heat the place with a bic lighter.
Actually, I used an infra red heater (self contained) that draws outside air for ombusiton and expells spent air to the outside. I have no exposed flame inside the building.

There are probably cheaper ways to do it but none this efficient.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2208 days


#11 posted 11-04-2010 07:16 PM

here’s more info

ceiling is about 10 feet
1 large window
side steel insulated door (with window)
garage door (insulated) , 17’
walls are insulated (2×6 framing) with pink batt insulation

-- Pabs

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2378 posts in 1637 days


#12 posted 11-04-2010 07:23 PM

Here is a great link for a “heat loss” calculator; it takes into consideration the size of the room, insulation, and outside temp and gives you an estimate for the amount of watts of heat you need.
http://www.dimplex.com/customer_support/heat_loss_calculator

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1584 days


#13 posted 11-04-2010 07:23 PM

NBeener…Prodex/Reflectix/etc. are mainly radiant barriers with some (but little) R value. R value varies depending on style choice..single bubble, double bubble, two layer foil, etc. These are great products for refelecting heat in or out. Your use in a, I assume steel, garage door is a great use of that type of insulation. For cold climates insulation with a higher R value would be more energy efficient.
As dhost said air infiltration is also a major concern. Caulk, seal, canned foam any thing that leaks air would be the shortest path to hold heat in. Foam sheeting is a big bang for the buck too. My ceiling is 1” plystyrene with 8” blown-in cellullose. Heat costs are low.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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GaryL

1080 posts in 1584 days


#14 posted 11-04-2010 07:26 PM

Looks like your in good shape, insulation wise. What ever is cheapest in your area, natural gas or whatever, would be a route to check into as for the style of heater to pursue.

Edit: Ceiling insulated? Most important area.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1928 days


#15 posted 11-04-2010 07:27 PM

Gary:

Allegedly, the Prodex has an R-value of 15.67.

Do you know differently ? Not sarcasm. Serious question.

EDIT: Ahhh. In attempting to stop heat loss, horizontally, that R-value DOES drop to 7.00 !

-- -- Neil

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