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Forum topic by MikeFromCanmore posted 04-22-2017 01:45 PM 352 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeFromCanmore

15 posts in 860 days


04-22-2017 01:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing raising the grain pine question

I have just installed my first home made moldings and now they are ready to be painted. Then I realized that my primer paint was going to raise the grain of the wood (pine) and that I would need to sand all those intricate curves.

So, my question is – What can I use for a primer that will not raise the grain, but will allow me to paint over it?

Thanks for listening

-- If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers.


4 replies so far

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Rich

3206 posts in 645 days


#1 posted 04-22-2017 02:14 PM

I’ve never had latex primer raise the grain. Try priming some scrap pieces and see how it behaves for your wood. I’ve also found the staff at stores like Sherwin Williams are very knowledgeable about what will work best for you, and glad to help out.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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MikeFromCanmore

15 posts in 860 days


#2 posted 04-22-2017 04:40 PM

Rich – OK, I will try a piece of scrap.
Thanks

-- If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers.

View JayCee123's profile

JayCee123

200 posts in 820 days


#3 posted 04-22-2017 07:43 PM

Try Zinsser primers.
Advanced Synthetic Shellac Primer … great stain blocker, wouldnt raise grain. Dries fast covers very well. Great base for finish coats. Use ventilation.
ps. Prime your moldings before you hang em :)

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MikeFromCanmore

15 posts in 860 days


#4 posted 04-24-2017 12:50 AM

JayCee123 – Zinsser is a fine product, but I don’t happen to have any just now. Instead I have used a regular acrylic primer and it seems that my fears were of the best kind – unfounded. I feel a very mild roughness which disappears with a fine sponge sanding block.

Of course, I knew about priming them first – but forgot, so I am doing it the hard way. Next time.

-- If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers.

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