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Plain old wood oil

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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 04-21-2017 02:16 PM 932 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

3103 posts in 2121 days


04-21-2017 02:16 PM

I’m looking for a plain wood oil that doesn’t have any hardeners in it. Just oil.

I want to try it on my shou sugi ban furniture. Been using tung oil and tugn/danish oil for a bit of color.
I would like to try and keep the furniture as light colored as possible, I know that’s impossible with shou sugi ban, but I don’t want them looking ebony.

Anyone know of a good plain old wood oil? No color.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


32 replies so far

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 403 days


#1 posted 04-21-2017 02:25 PM

How about Linseed Oil?

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1764 posts in 482 days


#2 posted 04-21-2017 03:04 PM

+1 for boiled linseed oil

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3103 posts in 2121 days


#3 posted 04-21-2017 03:11 PM

Linseed oil tends to further darken. It must be some kind of chemical burn.
In fact, BLO has pretty much ruined anything I’ve put it on, which is why I’ve been using a lighter oil like Danish oil.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1764 posts in 482 days


#4 posted 04-21-2017 03:14 PM

Try plain old mineral oil … I use a combination of of bee’s wax and mineral to clean my wooden planes; also an oil wicke of mineral oil to oil planes and saws … this has not “damaged” any wood to date.
 

 
I also use almond oil on my wooden fifes!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#5 posted 04-21-2017 03:19 PM

I agree with Ron about the mineral oil. It’s about as clear as it gets.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

440 posts in 2869 days


#6 posted 04-21-2017 03:53 PM

My understanding is that BLO has dryers.

For a non-coloring, non-drying oil, mineral oil comes to mind. You can buy it at any drug store.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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RussellAP

3103 posts in 2121 days


#7 posted 04-21-2017 04:45 PM

I might have some mineral oil lying around the shop.
As I remember, it was thick.
Can it be cut with mineral spirits?
What would be best to thin mineral oil?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View JayCee123's profile

JayCee123

196 posts in 599 days


#8 posted 04-21-2017 06:27 PM

Mineral oils not that thick, especially once you start working it into the wood. Mineral spirits or turpentine can be readily mix with mineral oil. Mineral oil is water clear, turps is slightly amber. If you want a slight bit of amber add a little paraffin oil, the stuff you use for rubbing out finishes. Respectfully, does it make that much difference to your project? Do you remove that much of the charred surface?

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Rick_M

10608 posts in 2214 days


#9 posted 04-22-2017 03:58 AM

I don’t think you’ll be happy with mineral spirits, it looks good going on but a week later it’ll look like you didn’t do anything. I would suggest wax. Paraffin is probably the most neutral but you’ll have to melt it, possibly thin it. Beeswax might work for you.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#10 posted 04-22-2017 04:24 AM



I don t think you ll be happy with mineral spirits, it looks good going on but a week later it ll look like you didn t do anything. I would suggest wax. Paraffin is probably the most neutral but you ll have to melt it, possibly thin it. Beeswax might work for you.

- Rick M

I’m with you, but the OP was so specific about “plain oil,” that I skipped suggesting anything else.

Honestly, if you want a beautiful finish, go with Tried & True Original Wood Finish. It’s polymerized linseed oil and beeswax. The results are amazing.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Rick_M

10608 posts in 2214 days


#11 posted 04-22-2017 06:44 AM

I meant mineral oil. Brain fart.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

710 posts in 2684 days


#12 posted 04-22-2017 08:04 AM

I don’t understand why there isn’t more discussion about Liberon furniture oil. I use it on black Walnut and Mahogany with fantastic results.
It’s not cheap but well worth it imop

-- Ken

View pontic's profile

pontic

500 posts in 443 days


#13 posted 04-22-2017 10:16 AM

Do like the Japanese do bleach it first then use BLO or BTO.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#14 posted 04-22-2017 11:58 AM

Only experience have with any wood burning are all those plywood hooch’s stayed in Vietnam. Think from the smell used kerosene as the final finish in-out side. Not sure who built, burnt, or finished inside those hooch’s.

From everything read about “SHOO-SUGI-BAN”, wood either unfinished or coated with natural oils. While Japanese used specific species of woods no word on type of oil other than natural oils.

If don’t want wood to look like ebony refine your burning, cleaning technique and leave unfinished or use a natural oil. Don’t actually know if Shoo-Sugi-Ban treated wood will darken with age when expose to UV rays. Natural oils can be drying normally used as wood finishes like Linseed, Tung, and Walnut oil. The only drying oil that affords any protection from water or moisture is Tung Oil if apply enough coats. There are other drying oils too just too many to list same is true of non-drying, or semi drying you could use.

Mineral oil (petroleum base) is a not drying oil finish I use for anything make for food safe knowing has to re-coated with use & time. Have no doubt would work on a Shoo-Sugi-Ban project in or outside as long as re-apply as needed.

-- Bill

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Rick_M

10608 posts in 2214 days


#15 posted 04-24-2017 05:00 AM

Maybe you should try the newest fad, soap.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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