LumberJocks

HVLP Decision

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by JustLikeJames posted 04-21-2017 12:21 AM 413 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


04-21-2017 12:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hvlp fuji apollo sprayfine earlex latex

I want to step up from my 2 stage Earlex HV5500. It’s a great sprayer for nearly every wood finish except for latex paint. It will spray latex, but I have to thin it a little more than I’m comfortable with. I’ve considered airless, but the setup and cleanup is too much for the small projects I do. I looked at the Graco handheld airless guns, which are better for small projects, but I think they’d be heavy and awkward. So I’m going to stick to HVLP, but get a more powerful turbine.

I’d appreciate everybody’s opinions on the units I’ve got it narrowed down to. As far as specs on paper, these units all perform similarly but that’s just on paper…

Fuji Mini Mite 4
Apollo Eco 4
Sprayfine A401 (not much info on this one, but it’s much lower priced)

Thanks


14 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4383 posts in 2124 days


#1 posted 04-21-2017 01:58 PM

I have a Fuji Super Gold 4, and can’t say enough good things about it….or their customer service. Even so, I doubt I would try to spray latex (if you mean wall paint), though I have sprayed a fair amount of acrylic enamel (sometimes labeled “latex”) though it, usually with the 1.8MM needle set. Works great.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5201 posts in 2444 days


#2 posted 04-21-2017 03:19 PM

You can spray acrylic paint with any gravity feed conversion HVLP gun and a 2.0mm needle and nozzle set.
Thin 10-15% with water, and it will spray flawlessly.

I have an airless, which I never use for furniture or cabinets. I knew a cabinet maker that used an airless exclusively for spraying lacquer. It works and lays down a thick coat quickly, but as you mention the cleanup is a headache.

I have a collection of gravity feed HVLP guns running off the compressor. I am quite impressed with these simple guns. From poly to lacquer to acrylic they have all sprayed just the way I want. No orange peel, and good control to avoid runs or other problems.

If you are happy with your current sprayer for clear topcoats, and just want to add the ability to spray thick acrylic paint, why not just add a gravity feed to your arsenal?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1703 posts in 3501 days


#3 posted 04-21-2017 03:48 PM

Fuji +1

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3167 posts in 1428 days


#4 posted 04-21-2017 04:13 PM

I really like my Fuji.


Fuji +1

- CharlesNeil


-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

20 posts in 679 days


#5 posted 04-21-2017 04:54 PM

Ditto for the Fuji Gold 4, great machine. Like the others have said, latex does not work well with these machines. I have found Target Coatings to be a good water-based finish to use with the Fuji.

Rick

View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


#6 posted 04-21-2017 07:11 PM



I have a Fuji Super Gold 4, and can t say enough good things about it….or their customer service. Even so, I doubt I would try to spray latex (if you mean wall paint), though I have sprayed a fair amount of acrylic enamel (sometimes labeled “latex”) though it, usually with the 1.8MM needle set. Works great.

- Fred Hargis

I should have clarified that. I actually didn’t mean wall paint. My first task will be painting an exterior door so acrylic enamel is probably more accurate.
When I paint my walls, I just brush and roll.

I’m leaning toward Fuji (I’ve only heard good about them), but it’s a few $100 higher than sprayfine. My money is tight so I don’t want to spend more than I really have to. That’s what makes the choice hard.

Thanks.

View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


#7 posted 04-21-2017 07:15 PM



You can spray acrylic paint with any gravity feed conversion HVLP gun and a 2.0mm needle and nozzle set.
Thin 10-15% with water, and it will spray flawlessly.

I have an airless, which I never use for furniture or cabinets. I knew a cabinet maker that used an airless exclusively for spraying lacquer. It works and lays down a thick coat quickly, but as you mention the cleanup is a headache.

I have a collection of gravity feed HVLP guns running off the compressor. I am quite impressed with these simple guns. From poly to lacquer to acrylic they have all sprayed just the way I want. No orange peel, and good control to avoid runs or other problems.

If you are happy with your current sprayer for clear topcoats, and just want to add the ability to spray thick acrylic paint, why not just add a gravity feed to your arsenal?

- pintodeluxe

I’ve considered that, but I currently don’t own or have room for a large compressor. I also like the ease of portability with turbine hvlp and that it’s all one predetermined, self contained system (kinda foolproof even for me).

Thanks

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

512 posts in 222 days


#8 posted 04-21-2017 07:28 PM

I have Fuji 4, which I am very pleased with. I underutilize it however. Most often then not I choose oil based finish, which creates a mess if you do it inside without proper protection/ventilation so I feel I will sell it soon. For water based it is invaluable. You cannot make the same smooth finish with anything else.

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

395 posts in 3102 days


#9 posted 04-25-2017 04:39 PM

I have an A401 from SprayFine and it has done everything I’ve asked of it with either no thinning or minimal thinning.

Pros—
lower initial cost and lower accessory cost. N/N/Aircap sets are less then $40 as compared to other brands.

similar price reductions on consumables like filters and gaskets

good customer support, answered all my questions promptly

long hose, haven’t experienced issues with heat from turbine air causing problems with finishes

Can use the 3M system with the cup liners, etc.

Cons—
still a bleeder gun design, same as your Earlex and so probably won’t give you any issues. Just don’t point it at areas with wet finish unless you are spraying. You can use non-bleeder guns as the turbine does have a bypass but on the whole, this shortens the life of the turbine

stock gun is on the heavy side. You can opt for a gravity fed (w/ pressurized cup) option or switch to smaller cups for weight savings. Or go with a 2’ extension hose so the cup is off the gun.

Stock gun can be a bit fussy to adjust. But then so was the Fuji XPR (the one with the top mount cup that can swivel—might not have the name right) and the Apollo systems I borrowed to play with. But after a little bit you get the hang of it.

Summary—

All in for a 4-stage w/ gun, 4 sets of N/N/aircaps, cleaning supplies, extra gaskets & filters, etc. I was around $650 delivered.

I don’t spray every day, maybe once per month and it has been good for me. Buy a remote switch on Amazon for $20 and you are off to the races.

That said, I borrowed a Fuji rig and really liked their gun better. If I was going to be using a system more frequently than I do, the Fuji is probably worth the extra few bucks. I also borrowed an Apollo 4-stage rig (not the latest model) and it had their stock gun, a cup-under design. That gun was also heavy like the SprayFine. I think it is the combination of the cup-under and the hose coming off the bottom that made it a little tiring.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


#10 posted 04-25-2017 09:44 PM



I have an A401 from SprayFine and it has done everything I ve asked of it with either no thinning or minimal thinning.

Pros—
lower initial cost and lower accessory cost. N/N/Aircap sets are less then $40 as compared to other brands.

similar price reductions on consumables like filters and gaskets

good customer support, answered all my questions promptly

long hose, haven t experienced issues with heat from turbine air causing problems with finishes

Can use the 3M system with the cup liners, etc.

Cons—
still a bleeder gun design, same as your Earlex and so probably won t give you any issues. Just don t point it at areas with wet finish unless you are spraying. You can use non-bleeder guns as the turbine does have a bypass but on the whole, this shortens the life of the turbine

stock gun is on the heavy side. You can opt for a gravity fed (w/ pressurized cup) option or switch to smaller cups for weight savings. Or go with a 2 extension hose so the cup is off the gun.

Stock gun can be a bit fussy to adjust. But then so was the Fuji XPR (the one with the top mount cup that can swivel—might not have the name right) and the Apollo systems I borrowed to play with. But after a little bit you get the hang of it.

Summary—

All in for a 4-stage w/ gun, 4 sets of N/N/aircaps, cleaning supplies, extra gaskets & filters, etc. I was around $650 delivered.

I don t spray every day, maybe once per month and it has been good for me. Buy a remote switch on Amazon for $20 and you are off to the races.

That said, I borrowed a Fuji rig and really liked their gun better. If I was going to be using a system more frequently than I do, the Fuji is probably worth the extra few bucks. I also borrowed an Apollo 4-stage rig (not the latest model) and it had their stock gun, a cup-under design. That gun was also heavy like the SprayFine. I think it is the combination of the cup-under and the hose coming off the bottom that made it a little tiring.

- rwyoung

Thanks! Very thorough and informative. Sounds like owners of both guns are pleased. I think I’ll price out both setups tonight (found a good fuji deal at spraygunworld.com, but still higher than Sprayfine) and see how much apart they are. I like the idea of the Fuji gravity feed that can be swiveled around, other than that, the two seem very much the same.

Thanks again.

View ronihadlock's profile

ronihadlock

1 post in 235 days


#11 posted 04-26-2017 12:37 AM

another vote for Fuji, excellent build quality.

View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


#12 posted 04-26-2017 02:01 AM

Thanks everyone.

OK, lots of votes for Fuji, maybe it’s worth the extra $ just for the peace of mind.

As an unlikely alternative, if I was to keep my Earlex for finer finishes and buy a Graco handheld airless just for thick latex (it’s less $ than either HVLP setup), can anyone vouch for their quality? I’m not familiar with all the tips available and whether or not the finish is as nice as HVLP provides. I know I’ve read alot about pump malfunctions and heavy weight, but lots of pros use those guns for some reason.

Just an idea, I like to explore all the options.

View zzzzdoc's profile

zzzzdoc

540 posts in 2633 days


#13 posted 04-26-2017 02:05 AM

Very much like the Fuji Q4 Platinum.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

View JustLikeJames's profile

JustLikeJames

141 posts in 1193 days


#14 posted 04-26-2017 02:18 AM



Fuji +1

- CharlesNeil

I only just now realized that The Charles Neil gave a vote for Fuji. I’ve watched so many of your videos, including ones about the Earlex machine, and learned so much that you’re a legend in my book. Thank you so much for what you do and for taking the time to read and comment on a forum post from a regular guy like me.
Seriously, I think that’s awesome!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com