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Rust treatment on a table saw?

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Forum topic by George_SA posted 04-20-2017 07:00 PM 766 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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George_SA

314 posts in 2026 days


04-20-2017 07:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rust treatment rust prevention tablesaw

I live at the coast about 20 km from the sea (about three and a half years now) I haven’t done much in my shop for the past couple of months (sometimes life gets in the way of woodworking). The other day I wanted to cut some boards and noticed that my table saw had become quite rusty.

Round about 2001 to 2003 I was quite active the Google group Rec.woodworking and a lot of the guys on that discussion board recommended that you put floor wax on the saw and after you have rubbed it up you put baby powder on it to help prevent rust. In those days I lived inland and after I treated my table saw with wax and baby powder it didn’t really need anymore treatment.

At the coast however tools need preventative care more often and I realised that I have been a bit negligent in this area. After cleaning my table saw with some rust remover I again used the wax and baby powder treatment and that made me wonder how many of the guys on LJ also use this type of treatment and what other treatments are in use to prevent rust? Also how often do you use this treatment on your saw?

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity


18 replies so far

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

106 posts in 1044 days


#1 posted 04-20-2017 07:22 PM

I’m sure you will get a torrent of responses but I’ll start the ball rolling. I am a strong believer in the KISS principle and to that end I use this on my automobiles, deck furniture, bathroom and kitchen fixtures as well as anything cast iron in my shop. No nonsense, true commercial quality and the most carnuba for the money.
& http://www.collinite.com/automotive-wax/liquid-metal-wax/

http://www.collinite.com/automotive-wax/super-doublecoat-paste-wax/

They make marine formulas but I don’t think you need the extra UV protection.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2515 posts in 1981 days


#2 posted 04-20-2017 08:00 PM

There are many rust prevention remedy’s. Below a cheap one with is used for a long time.

Linseed oil.

More information here. or here

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4459 posts in 951 days


#3 posted 04-20-2017 08:15 PM

I use paste wax as well. I just clean the table really well with Scotchbrite pads and reapply whenever I see the first signs of surface rust appear. I’d guess I do it 2 or 3 times a year.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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diverlloyd

2283 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 04-20-2017 08:39 PM

Johnsons floor paste wax.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

546 posts in 721 days


#5 posted 04-20-2017 08:48 PM

Krud Kutter

Followed by Johnson’s paste wax.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View JohnSzwarc's profile

JohnSzwarc

5 posts in 237 days


#6 posted 04-20-2017 08:57 PM

I’ve brought a couple machines back to life that others told me were too far gone with rust. And I use the same treatment on every machine in the shop about once every two years. Here’s what I do: Take an old random orbit sander, some 220 grit disks and a spray can of WD40. Apply the WD40 liberally to the rusted surface and go to town with the sander. Keep it wet with oil and have a rag handy to wipe it down occasionally. It will take a while, but the rust will be gone when your done. Clean all the oil off and apply the wax of your choice for regular protection. That’s what I do. Your experience may vary.

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MrUnix

5900 posts in 2011 days


#7 posted 04-20-2017 09:10 PM

Paste wax and then cover the surface with something breathable. Here in Florida where I’m at, we have temperature/humidity swings that will leave an outside patio dripping wet from the dew, and that happens almost every day during certain times of the year. Even though I have several machines that live on the patio, a good wax and then covering with something like an old packing blanket has kept them rust free.

Never heard of the baby powder trick…

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10462 posts in 2192 days


#8 posted 04-21-2017 12:57 AM

Brad I’ve had bad luck covering my tablesaws with cloth. It seems to hold moisture and causes rust.

Never heard of the baby powder thing, maybe someone joking around, or maybe they used the wrong wax and made their saw sticky.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

378 posts in 1274 days


#9 posted 04-21-2017 01:44 AM

I have used wd40 and random orbital sander to clean up several tools. Alot of the rust may wipe off with a rag and wd40. Then I use 600 grit with the surface damp still with wd40. When I am done with that I wipe it down with alcohol to get rid of all the wd40. And paste wax it. I live in the dry southwest desert. So keeping up with wax is enough for me. I agree with brad on finding a breathable cover for your tools.

-- John

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1633 posts in 1706 days


#10 posted 04-21-2017 01:59 AM

Spray on shellac on my bandsaw table.
Wax or oil for my hand tools.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

378 posts in 1274 days


#11 posted 04-21-2017 12:15 PM

I have used wd40 and random orbital sander to clean up several tools. Alot of the rust may wipe off with a rag and wd40. Then I use 600 grit with the surface damp still with wd40. When I am done with that I wipe it down with alcohol to get rid of all the wd40. And paste wax it. I live in the dry southwest desert. So keeping up with wax is enough for me. I agree with brad on finding a breathable cover for your tools. Must be tough to keep your tools nice with all the humidity.

-- John

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

440 posts in 2847 days


#12 posted 04-21-2017 04:13 PM

We have a rainy season in the spring and fall that’s humid, but it’s not like I’m on the coast, so take this with a grain of salt. I’m decently happy with Boeshield T-9 for preventing rust. It’s paraffin based, so it leaves a thin coat of wax, apparently. It’s easy to apply and will prevent rust for a while, but you have to reapply it periodically if you’re using the tool.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

394 posts in 1782 days


#13 posted 04-21-2017 05:15 PM

I live in Tampa, FL. I use Johnston’s paste wax on my table saw, recoating about every six months. In over three years no signs of rust.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1012 posts in 2573 days


#14 posted 04-22-2017 02:50 PM

I recommend WD-40

I live in a humid southern city (Atlanta, GA) and for years I have used WD-40 sprayed on my tools and machines (including an expensive metal lathe and mill) about once a year and they remain rust free. The trick is to spray it on and LEAVE IT overnight before wiping down with paper towels. WD-40 is made to seep into the steel microstructure and displace any moisture. It then leaves a coating that protects the surface from rust. This coating does not come off on wood passing through the machine. You can read all about how it works and its history at the WD-40 website https://wd40.com/cool-stuff/history

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View George_SA's profile

George_SA

314 posts in 2026 days


#15 posted 04-24-2017 06:17 AM

Hey guys, thanks for interesting replies and links.
Dutchy, thanks for the info on linseed oil. I learned something new from that.
Planeman40, thanks for the link to the WD-40 website. Some interesting info there.

The bay powder that I use after I have waxed and rubbed up my table saw makes it very smooth. It especially helps when I have to drag my sled across the saw.

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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