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I made a $174.00 mistake this past weekend.

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Forum topic by Alan72 posted 04-20-2017 04:18 AM 1558 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alan72

201 posts in 1701 days


04-20-2017 04:18 AM

This past weekend I was working in my garage cutting tenons on my Table saw. I accidentally set off my Brake on my SawStop. I wasted a 2 month old Ridgid Carbide Saw blade that I bought at the Woodworking show this past Feb, then I had to go out and buy a new Cartage for the saw. When the saw first fired I was like SH*T What Happened? I realized that I was cutting the tenons on the inside of the Jig and the blade must of contacted the jig, that Tripped the brake. I know it can happen with this saw and I still love having the safety feature, because if was my hand or fingers my co pay for an ER visit cost almost the same and the saw blade and cartage.

My question is Has anyone ever Tripped their Brake on your SS and do you still continue to use expensive blades after your tripped the saw the first time?


19 replies so far

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2465 posts in 2551 days


#1 posted 04-20-2017 05:29 AM

First and only time I tripped my SS was with my Incra mitre gauge, set it too close to the dado blade I was using. Was strange, the blade just disappeared and I stood there for a moment wondering what happened, then immediately checked all my fingers. Finally realized that it was the mitre gauge. I now have written on the gauge “Check the blade gap!”

Hasn’t stopped me from using my regular blades in the SS, just reminded me that I need to be more careful.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View kajunkraft's profile

kajunkraft

141 posts in 1878 days


#2 posted 04-20-2017 07:07 AM

Got my Sawstop about 2 years ago. Put on an inexpensive blade assuming I would screw up. Sure enough, using a straight edge jig an aluminum piece hit the blade and the system activated. Totally my fault. The damage to the jig was very minor. The blade with cartridge hang prominently by my table saw to remind me. Hasn’t happened again, still have all my fingers and am using a rather expensive blade now. Love my saw but do use the bypass feature when cutting anything that seems like it may be an issue.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7638 posts in 3043 days


#3 posted 04-20-2017 09:31 AM

A good blade will make or break the performance of your saw. If you don’t want to risk a $100 blade, try the Delta Industrial 35-7657 40T through Cripe Distribution for ~ $30 shipped.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Carloz

578 posts in 259 days


#4 posted 04-20-2017 10:36 AM



First and only time I tripped my SS was with my Incra mitre gauge, set it too close to the dado blade I was using. Was strange, the blade just disappeared and I stood there for a moment wondering what happened, then immediately checked all my fingers. Finally realized that it was the mitre gauge. I now have written on the gauge “Check the blade gap!”

Hasn t stopped me from using my regular blades in the SS, just reminded me that I need to be more careful.

- Manitario


How close it too close ?

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

4448 posts in 2161 days


#5 posted 04-20-2017 10:51 AM

Your blade might still be usable. I’ve read several posts where guys have recovered the blade with no apparent damage. Since it’s a quality blade you could send it to Ridge Carbide for inspection. Of course, all this depends on you separating it from the cartridge.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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dhazelton

2551 posts in 1964 days


#6 posted 04-20-2017 12:34 PM

At least you know the system works.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

787 posts in 1620 days


#7 posted 04-20-2017 12:41 PM

My saw is four years old and I have never triggered the cartridge. I use Woodworker II blades. I can’t imagine owning a high quality saw and then putting a lower quality blade on it.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2465 posts in 2551 days


#8 posted 04-25-2017 05:36 PM

Close enough to take a chunk out of the aluminum

First and only time I tripped my SS was with my Incra mitre gauge, set it too close to the dado blade I was using. Was strange, the blade just disappeared and I stood there for a moment wondering what happened, then immediately checked all my fingers. Finally realized that it was the mitre gauge. I now have written on the gauge “Check the blade gap!”

Hasn t stopped me from using my regular blades in the SS, just reminded me that I need to be more careful.

- Manitario

How close it too close ?

- Carloz


-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

6810 posts in 1996 days


#9 posted 04-25-2017 05:47 PM

All of the above anecdotes are a big part of the reason why we decided not to switch from our PM saws to SS. We haven’t had a TS injury in the 20 years I’ve worked at the company. We put the money into a used Selco panel saw instead and never looked back. Now we only have 1 TS left in the shop.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1398 posts in 2735 days


#10 posted 04-25-2017 06:23 PM

...I don’t think I’d switch to a cheap blade to avoid a little cost on the back end.

1) I use (mostly) Woodworker II and it can be had at coastaltool.com for 109.

I know that trip hurt but its nice to know its there. I know I’ve read of others sending blades to forrest and they repair them for a cost thats better than a new blade.

I did try the gold ss blade that is very good by and did a good cut. It’s not at the WWII level but still a good blade. That could be an alternative.

Good luck but good to know it was just metal! Cheers.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5273 posts in 2481 days


#11 posted 04-25-2017 06:39 PM


All of the above anecdotes are a big part of the reason why we decided not to switch from our PM saws to SS. We haven t had a TS injury in the 20 years I ve worked at the company. We put the money into a used Selco panel saw instead and never looked back. Now we only have 1 TS left in the shop.

- Mainiac Matt

^^^ To be clear, all of the above accidents appear to involve 1. Holding something metal, and 2. Pushing that metal into the saw blade. That isn’t considered a false trip, and that’s part of how the system works.
I haven’t ever had a brake trip. I use plywood sacrificial pieces on my miter gauge.

When you go to the E.R. with your hand wrapped in a blue shop towel, believe me the medical bill is the last thing on your mind. You just want to keep your fingers. It worked out well for me, and didn’t involve a Sawstop. That is what led me to purchase one though.

As far as the folks who did experience a tripped brake, that is a bummer. It sounds like you have each discovered the tiny mistake that led to the cartridge activation. I could easily see that happening. Thanks for sharing your stories, to help the rest of us avoid it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View clin's profile

clin

689 posts in 664 days


#12 posted 04-25-2017 08:38 PM


All of the above anecdotes are a big part of the reason why we decided not to switch from our PM saws to SS. We haven t had a TS injury in the 20 years I ve worked at the company. We put the money into a used Selco panel saw instead and never looked back. Now we only have 1 TS left in the shop.

- Mainiac Matt

Like many of the “Why I don’t have a SawStop” arguments, this doesn’t really hold water. A SawStop is like insurance. Therefore it costs money. Both in the more expensive saw and in possible replacement cartridges and blades.

The same logic applies to safety features like airbags in cars. The car costs more, there’s a chance of setting it off when it doesn’t’ need to be. Or like fire insurance on your home. Most of us never need it.

Most of us will go our entire lives driving or riding in a car and will never be in an accident that required airbags. BUT, often enough they save your life. Just as a SawStop may save your fingers.

It’s a probability thing. Just because your shop has gone 20 years without an accident, doesn’t mean you won’t have one tomorrow. It does indicate you probably have shop policies that help. I’m not saying 20 years accident free is just luck, but it’s no guarantee.

Also, just as you can have shop standards to prevent accidents, you can have them to prevent bone-head mistakes that trigger a SawStop.

I’ve been driving and riding in cars my whole life (as most of us) and after 56 years, I’ve never been in anything other than very minor fender benders. Doesn’t mean I should drive without safety features in my car.

In the end, it is a calculation will all have to make. I’m certainly not saying everyone should use a SawStop.

-- Clin

View Alan72's profile

Alan72

201 posts in 1701 days


#13 posted 04-25-2017 09:09 PM

I decided that going back to a higher quality blade is the direction that I ‘am headed towards. This past week I put one of my old Freud 50 tooth combo blades in the saw and I am not too happy with it. I never owned a Forrest blade so I’ll have to wait to next month. Thanks for all of the responses.

I love my Table saw but sometimes it doesn’t love me!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5273 posts in 2481 days


#14 posted 04-25-2017 10:59 PM

There’s a big difference between an “old” 50 tooth blade and a new 40 tooth blade, regardless of brand.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

42 posts in 1457 days


#15 posted 04-25-2017 11:10 PM

Welcome to the club. We have hats and jackets. It is generally only something you do once.

I did mine when I brought the metal combo square over too early to adjust the height and toughed the blade during coast down…Lost the brake, but not the blade.

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