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Forum topic by kur1j posted 04-18-2017 01:48 PM 3517 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kur1j

14 posts in 473 days


04-18-2017 01:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: storage shelving wood

i am wanting to use the space above my garage doors to put pieces of lumber.

I was planning on putting something between the garage lift and, the metal track railing the garage door rides on, and right above the rolling bar at the back wall. https://m.imgur.com/gallery/xS80Y

This will give me 2 feet high, 4 feet or so wide and 8 feet long or so of room to put wood. What should I use to mount to the back wall and ceiling to do this?

I was thinking of using the angle steel but not sure what gauge of steel to get. The biggest thing that Lowes seems to have is 12 gauge and that looks really thin to me.

I was planning on using two 6-8 feet pieces and attach them to the ceiling running in the same direction as the garage door chain (perpendicular to the rafters) http://imgur.com/a/TcJ0m. At that point drop 2-4 pieces down on each side (on each rafter point) and then a couple pieces between each rail. So it would like something like this |_| looking straight on. I just don’t know how much it will hold.

Any suggestions? I wasn’t sure where to put the topic.


17 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

477 posts in 632 days


#1 posted 04-18-2017 03:13 PM

I have the exact same setup as you in terms of double garage doors. I built some shelves out of wood and screwed them to the wood that the track and opener are mounted to. I built 3, so that I could store long and short boards. It’s a little bit of a pain in that you have to close the door and then maneuver around the door tracks, but it’s not the worst. I’ll see if I have a pic anywhere on my phone.

View clin's profile

clin

881 posts in 1046 days


#2 posted 04-18-2017 08:13 PM

Too many DIY ways to mention.

But if you’re considering steel, consider getting SafeRack overhead storage. They are very heavy duty and at the moment you can get a 4’x8’ for $170 or 2 for $270. I bought four of them about a year ago for $300 for 2. The price included shipping. Though you’d want to check on that in case that has changed. They are very heavy, so free shipping was a big deal.

They are height adjustable so you can fit them to the space. At that price, it really isn’t worth the trouble of building your own steel units. These are painted (powder coated?) . Very flexible in how they install with cross pieces that bolt to roof/ceiling framing. But the unit itself can be positioned anywhere along those cross pieces. Bottom line you can securely mount them, yet put them right were you want them.

FYI on the height. There are three overlapping height ranges and you need to specific which of the three when ordering. But in your case, the middle range of 18” to 33” looks like it would be the one to get. I can’t recommend these highly enough.

https://www.saferacks.com

-- Clin

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4426 posts in 3792 days


#3 posted 04-18-2017 09:12 PM

I have these for high storage. Extremely strong.. each bracket will hold 500 pounds.
I have 12 foot ceiling, so I have the three standards, over my garage door since 2004

https://woodworkerssupply.com/24-hd-shelf-standard-mssu-818-228.asp?search=shelf%20brackets&searchmode=2

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

303 posts in 1900 days


#4 posted 04-19-2017 01:08 AM

Keep in mind what your roof rafters can carry for load. Many trusses were never designed for a load beyond the normal snow load.

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kur1j

14 posts in 473 days


#5 posted 04-19-2017 03:04 AM



I have these for high storage. Extremely strong.. each bracket will hold 500 pounds.
I have 12 foot ceiling, so I have the three standards, over my garage door since 2004

https://woodworkerssupply.com/24-hd-shelf-standard-mssu-818-228.asp?search=shelf%20brackets&searchmode=2

- DrDirt

Thanks for the info. This could be used but only on a single wall side and it really won’t be enough room with only 1 place to put it (it would have to be higher than the car).

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kur1j

14 posts in 473 days


#6 posted 04-19-2017 03:06 AM



Keep in mind what your roof rafters can carry for load. Many trusses were never designed for a load beyond the normal snow load.

- eflanders

The garage is right below the second story of the house. I’m not sure I see much difference in having a 1500lb pool table pushing down on 3 trusses and 500 lbs pulling down across on 5-6 trusses.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2002 posts in 2688 days


#7 posted 04-19-2017 06:47 PM

I had something like the “safe racks” in a previous house which had 12’+ ceiling in the garage with only a 7’ high door. I didn’t store lumber there, though – mostly light bulky stuff like luggage etc.

I agree that if you can put a water bed upstairs, you should be able to (instead) hang some few hundred pounds down below.

View Marcio Wilges's profile

Marcio Wilges

35 posts in 1347 days


#8 posted 12-04-2017 06:44 AM

The set up looks pretty neat and ready to be executed. I would like to have the additional storage space above my garage door too if possible but I doubt there is enough ceiling space to accommodate that. I think the space is under-utilized and would be really useful as extra storage.

-- Marcio Wilges @ http://www.platinumremovals.com.au/

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

170 posts in 255 days


#9 posted 12-04-2017 10:32 AM

subscribed.

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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Bluenote38

271 posts in 438 days


#10 posted 12-04-2017 02:24 PM


Keep in mind what your roof rafters can carry for load. Many trusses were never designed for a load beyond the normal snow load.

- eflanders

The garage is right below the second story of the house. I m not sure I see much difference in having a 1500lb pool table pushing down on 3 trusses and 500 lbs pulling down across on 5-6 trusses.

- kur1j

A 10’x5’ 1” slate professional pool table will weigh about 1150lbs. A common residential (7’) pool table is about 650lbs Both are about 22-24 pounds per square foot, Residential Flooring is designed for 30psf in newer homes (US after 1985). So add your 550lbs to whatever is on the floor overhead and don’t exceed the 30psf. Oh, don’t forget the people too :-)

-- Bill - Rochester MI

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Fresch

263 posts in 1971 days


#11 posted 12-04-2017 02:37 PM

Look up B-Line, Unistrut, Kindorf, purchase it at Electrical supply houses. Make any thing you can think up.

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 255 days


#12 posted 12-04-2017 05:20 PM


A 10×5 1” slate professional pool table will weigh about 1150lbs. A common residential (7 ) pool table is about 650lbs Both are about 22-24 pounds per square foot, Residential Flooring is designed for 30psf in newer homes (US after 1985). So add your 550lbs to whatever is on the floor overhead and don t exceed the 30psf. Oh, don t forget the people too :-)
- Bluenote38

That’s only if his table is transferring the weight evenly across the entire surface area of the top of the table, most tables have 4 legs, so a 1000 lb table puts 250 lbs at each of the 4 corner legs (an example of point loading not distributive loading)

likewise, when I weigh 190lbs and stand still, I’m transferring 190lbs per square foot (I wear 11.5 shoes) down onto the floor..

I believe you might be referring to LIVE LOAD considerations and not DEAD LOAD considerations.
even then, the 30psf loading you mention is usually a roof loading design criteria.

it gets interesting when you look at the idea of me standing directly on a truss/joist/etc or standing any proportional distance between trusses/joists/etc. the loading transferred to each truss/joist varies.

I installed a platform above my garage doors using a clete at the exterior wall to hold one edge of the plywood and my steel supports and then used a 2X4 spliced at the other edge of the plywood held in place with threaded rod (transferring the load up into my attic space and spanning the bottom chord of two trusses).

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

View Steve's profile

Steve

477 posts in 632 days


#13 posted 12-05-2017 12:43 AM

Here’s my setup.

Little bit of a pain maneuvering longer pieces around the door tracks. But overall, it does the trick.

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

170 posts in 255 days


#14 posted 12-05-2017 01:29 AM


Here s my setup. Little bit of a pain maneuvering longer pieces around the door tracks. But overall, it does the trick.
- bndawgs

GREAT IDEA.. keeps it off the floor/ceiling joists and it’ll probably support longer material than what the OP had in mind…

if you’re looking for a REAL upgrade (BNDAWGS or OP) then remove those traditional garage door openers and install one of these.. (liftmaster 8700)

(it opens the door by turning the torsion bar above the door, so it frees up the entire center of the door at the ceiling)

Here you can see my clearance and where the previous door opener attached to the bracket (still at the wall)

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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kur1j

14 posts in 473 days


#15 posted 12-11-2017 03:09 PM

So this is what I ended up doing.

https://imgur.com/a/gLVCL

It’s been up for about 8 months now with about 250lbs of wood. I’m about 250lbs and was able to hang on each of the cross braces without any issues.

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