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Forum topic by ronmccormack posted 04-17-2017 02:45 AM 477 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ronmccormack

5 posts in 159 days


04-17-2017 02:45 AM

hello all, I’m aiming this post at those of you that have built or use a marquetry chevalet. I recently decided to build one and everything seems to be good, the problem is ive never used one before so im not sure how they are supposed to work. I know that you put the blade in facing down, which i have done. My question is: is it supposed to cut straight down vertically? mine is not it cuts at an angle. I also know that you do the key hole test to ensure 90 degrees and everything there is fine. It just cuts at an angle to the face of the test piece. Is this right?
i made the blade clamps my self and so there could be something there but no matter what i do as far as adjustment to the main arm, blade clamps, etc.. it still seems to want to cut at an angle. any help would be greatly appreciated.


9 replies so far

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Andre

1370 posts in 1560 days


#1 posted 04-17-2017 06:07 AM

Message Shipwright, he builds them and puts on classes during the summer. He even let me take one out for a test drive, almost had me hooked!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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johnstoneb

2535 posts in 1926 days


#2 posted 04-17-2017 02:04 PM

If you post on this forum. You might get a quicker answer.
Shipwright will probably answer it here but he might see it sooner on the chevalet topic.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/49202

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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shipwright

7683 posts in 2552 days


#3 posted 04-17-2017 03:17 PM

It could be any of several things.
What kind of blades are you using?
Is your saw frame level?
Are your blade clamps absolutely square in the saw frame?
Are the clamping faces of the blade clamps square/parallel to the outer sides?
Does it happen with every blade?
Some blades are machine ground form one side only and do tend to cut a little off particularly as they become dull. The ones I use tend to cut to the right as they get dull.
If you really want to get into french style marquetry (and if you built a chevalet I am assuming you do) I would highly recommend taking a course. There are three places you can go.
http://www.americanschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/
https://www.google.ca/search?q=marc+adams+school&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-ca&client=safari
http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/index.html
Patrick Edwards teaches at the first two and the last one is my school.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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ronmccormack

5 posts in 159 days


#4 posted 04-17-2017 08:23 PM

Thank you for your reply shipwright, I didn’t want to come out and say it but i was hoping you would read my post. right now i’m using flying dutchman 2/0 blades until i order some longer blades from patrick edwards, unless you know of another source? the way i have my blade clamps, they are not seated in the square hole so that i can use the shorter blades, however i tried rotating them various way’s too some success the odd thing is that if i rotate my clamps to the extreme, so the blade is obviously angled, the cut gets straighter. I have also tried various size fretsaw blades i had laying around to no avail. I’m under the assumption it is something with my blade clamps so im going to make a new set tonight and see if that helps.

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shipwright

7683 posts in 2552 days


#5 posted 04-17-2017 10:59 PM

I sell the same blades as Patrick does but at the same price so if you’re in Canada I’m a better deal and if you are in the USA he is. The only alternative I know of is to buy direct from Niqua in Germany but unless you buy a lot the shipping will kill you. Could be the blade clamps. I have clamps made for me now at a local machine shop. They run about $125 CAD if that interests you but I made my own for years and while not as pretty as these (or as easy) they pretty much all worked.
If you answer the rest of the questions I asked above I may be able to help a little more. Pictures wouldn’t hurt either.
Where are you located?
You can PM me if you don’t want that public.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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ronmccormack

5 posts in 159 days


#6 posted 04-19-2017 12:24 AM

shipwright, I live in upstate NY. As i said, I remade the blade clamps and saw frame, this helped alot but the problem is still there. I checked over everything and it all seems pretty much square and the way it should be. I tried adjusting the whole arm/upright/adjusters assembly to various angles and that didn’t seem to do anything. I posted some pictures, the blade clamps are the newer ones. The old ones i cut the L shape and fitted in a pad but i figured something must have been of with my filling. the newer ones i use the factory surface as the face of the pad. Like said the keyhole test comes out fine its just the blade doesn’t cut straight, I guess in use i could easily compensate for this but id like to get it right. If you see anything that jumps out at you let me know.


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shipwright

7683 posts in 2552 days


#7 posted 04-19-2017 01:14 AM

Looks like you followed my blog in at least some parts. I don’t use thata type of clamp any more but they worked fine so I don’t think that,s a problem.
Your error seems to be to the right as is mine (when getting dull)so I think I suspect the blades.
Have you tried different blades or a different dozen of the same ones?

If your keyhole tests are working out then there isn’t an adjustment to do so without being there I can’t help much.
I know you would like it to be “right” but the bottom line is that you can follow the line as well if it leads a little to the right as you could if it were straight down, you just have a different “reference plane”.
I had a lot of trouble with this when I was cutting thick packets of very hard wood and it went away when I returned to more “normal” cutting. Have you tried a packet of veneer ~ 3/8”- 1/2” thick? It may just be the thickness / hardness of your practice piece.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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ronmccormack

5 posts in 159 days


#8 posted 04-21-2017 12:41 AM

I have tried different blades, all very small though, with the same results. You could be right about about the thickness of the practice piece, its 1/2” poplar, not super thick but more then veneer. The funny thing is that before i made these blade clamps( and yes your blog was very much help, thank you!), it was pulling to the other side. However the very first cut i made as a test before the saw was “complete” it went straight down, then i finished it up or changed something and now it cuts off, I cant remember what it was i changed! You are right though that in practical use this pulling of the blade really wont matter, so i guess ill just get on with the marquetry! Thank you for all your quick and helpful responses, I really appreciate it.

One last question, relating to french marquetry. I have read that when you put the packets together that your supposed to use backer board. What is backer board? is it just plywood. Ive always just used waste veneer and cardboard on the scroll saw.

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shipwright

7683 posts in 2552 days


#9 posted 04-21-2017 02:09 PM

People use different things and get good results. Patrick sells a cheap veneer specifically for backers. I use 1/8” plywood because I believe it is less prone to breaking out. If you are packet cutting small pieces and a piece of your backer breaks out, it is a major screwup that may require starting over with a new packet or at least a tedious work around to get past the area. Cardboard may work better on a scrollsaw where you are fully backed up except for the little hole that the blade passes through. Typically on a chevalet you are unsupported for a half inch or so around the blade.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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