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Question About Planer Functionality & Safety

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Forum topic by Jangles posted 04-13-2017 05:26 PM 1000 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jangles

3 posts in 248 days


04-13-2017 05:26 PM

I cut a few different species of wood lengthwise a while back and joined them together with wood glue to make a nice pattern. It’s now a 1”x7” board. the board is now configured: 2” red oak, 1” poplar, 1” red oak, 1” poplar, 2” red oak. Well, the red oak and poplar are up to 1/16 of an inch taller or shorter on the unglued top. Picture running your hand across the 7” face and clearly feeling a height change when going from oak to poplar or vice versa.

Anyway, I figured I’d sand this down. After about 30 minutes with little progress, I realized I need another solution. I know how I SHOULD HAVE done this. I should have jointed the boards, then planed them to even thickness. Then I wouldn’t have this problem. Unfortunately I don’t own either of those tools.

Can I run this through a planer? Would that work? Is it dangerous with the way I have explained how the wood is configured? Or should I be safe and spend 5 hours sanding the darn thing.


7 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

16955 posts in 1696 days


#1 posted 04-13-2017 05:40 PM

I assume you mean its 1’ x 7’ and not inches. So these pieces are glued end grain to end grain right? Are they flat on the bottom? If they are flat on the bottom, it will be fine to run thru the planer. Make sure the planer is set for the highest dimension and taking a light pass. I would do this in very light passes.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4515 posts in 978 days


#2 posted 04-13-2017 07:14 PM

As long as you have 1 flat side, it will be fine.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4764 posts in 2332 days


#3 posted 04-13-2017 07:16 PM

My guess is it’s 1” thick and 7” wide, should be fine going through a planer…is there something that makes you hesitant? You do need a flat surface on one side. Or go old school: hand plane.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Jangles

3 posts in 248 days


#4 posted 04-13-2017 07:27 PM

It is a 7 inch wide board. I’ve got 4 of them, all about 3 feet long or so.

So the bottom is flatter than the top, but it’s definitely not flat.

Assume the bottom is just as uneven as the top. What’s the issue sending it through the planer? Is it a safety issue or a efficiency issue?

I am definitely not skilled enough with a hand plane to get that accomplished, especially not on oak. Maybe I should start honing that skill though.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#5 posted 04-13-2017 07:33 PM

What’s the issue sending it through the planer? Is it a safety issue or a efficiency issue?

It’s a non-issue. Just take light cuts until you get them even, then flip and do the same.
Although – your comment:

I should have jointed the boards, then planed them to even thickness. Then I wouldn’t have this problem. Unfortunately I don’t own either of those tools.
makes me think that not having a planer might just make it a bit more difficult :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jangles

3 posts in 248 days


#6 posted 04-17-2017 01:49 PM

Yes, the not-having-a-planer issue is the next step. I’ve heard of a few woodworking shops that will charge you to plane a board. Not ideal, but should be much less expensive than buying one.

Thanks for the help!

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#7 posted 04-17-2017 06:18 PM

You do need to plane the pieces flat, sanding would take forever. If you can’t afford to buy a planer, maybe look at a hand plane. properly set it would make short work of those boards.

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