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Band saw blade way off center adjusted for no drift

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Forum topic by vicjs posted 04-12-2017 01:38 AM 1074 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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vicjs

13 posts in 585 days


04-12-2017 01:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw set up blade drift

I am setting up a Delta 28-276 and have adjusted a new Olson 1/4”6 tpi blade with new cool blocks to cut smoothly with no drift. What concerns me is the blade gullet is 11/16 from the outer edge of the 1” tire. The tire appears to be in good shape, crowned, with no flat or high spots, and has been thoroughly cleaned.
Will I screw something up by running the saw with the blade this far off center. Is there of adjustment of the upper and/or lower wheels I can make for no drift and have the gullet centered on the tire. Have not mounted a 1/2” 3 tpi yet.
Newbie on a bs but have repaired and tuned table saws, milling machines, and metal lathes.
Thanks for your help.


13 replies so far

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MrUnix

5985 posts in 2033 days


#1 posted 04-12-2017 01:47 AM

Obligatory band saw tune up video:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass – YouTube

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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vicjs

13 posts in 585 days


#2 posted 04-12-2017 01:50 AM

Watched it twice, great video.

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Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#3 posted 04-12-2017 02:12 AM

Lots of bsaw topics here on lj’s. Brad knows bandsaws. Follow Snodgrass’s vid to the letter before doing anything else. Snodgrass says there’s no such thing as drift, but most folks need to make some adjustment but you can adjust for drift with blade alignment as you seem to have done.

If you adjust alignment for no drift chances are that the gullet will not be in the center of the upper wheel. That would be the proverbial perfect world. You may need to do a little of both.

Don’t worry about the lower wheel. No real adjustment there.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#4 posted 04-12-2017 07:05 AM

I’m with Snodgras: Drift is a myth tied to bad set up. I use my stock fence with a piece of plywood against it and it gives me veneer. If the blade wandered, that wouldn’t happen.

When I get drift, it’s because the blade is dull or the tension is low.

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Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#5 posted 04-12-2017 02:03 PM

I’m in process of adjusting my bandsaw for “drift”. Timley thread.

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Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#6 posted 04-12-2017 11:03 PM


I m with Snodgras: Drift is a myth tied to bad set up. I use my stock fence with a piece of plywood against it and it gives me veneer. If the blade wandered, that wouldn t happen.

When I get drift, it s because the blade is dull or the tension is low.

- Kelly

Good to know. Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated. I am still trying to do the “no drift” alignment but it continues to elude me. I’ve tried everything many, many times but still no luck. I can get accurate cuts and fantastic veneer but only after making a drift adjustment. What else could it be after 6 Snodgrass setups and the full range of tensioning, co-planer, teeth in the gullet, cool blocks, guide and thrust bearing adjustments, new Timberwolf…. yada yada yada….

What do you use to determine the proper tension?

It’s a real pain cuz it makes changing blades a half hour process.

Here’s another “no drift” video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrCShc5gPS0

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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joey502

507 posts in 1352 days


#7 posted 04-13-2017 12:43 AM

How thick is the materials you have tested your set up on? What type of cuts will you most often make with the saw? Tight curves and more intricate cuts or general ripping and reading type work?

The reason I ask is a 1/4” 6 tpi blade might not be the best choice for the cuts you are testing with. If the material is too thick for a higher tpi blade that could cause cut quality issues.

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vicjs

13 posts in 585 days


#8 posted 04-13-2017 03:00 AM



I am setting up a Delta 28-276 and have adjusted a new Olson 1/4”6 tpi blade with new cool blocks to cut smoothly with no drift. What concerns me is the blade gullet is 11/16 from the outer edge of the 1” tire. The tire appears to be in good shape, crowned, with no flat or high spots, and has been thoroughly cleaned.
Will I screw something up by running the saw with the blade this far off center. Is there of adjustment of the upper and/or lower wheels I can make for no drift and have the gullet centered on the tire. Have not mounted a 1/2” 3 tpi yet.
Newbie on a bs but have repaired and tuned table saws, milling machines, and metal lathes.
Thanks for your help.

- vicjs


Update. I changed to a 1/2” 3 tpi blade and started from scratch. Was able get no drift and the blade centered on the wheel. Cut consistent 3/32 slices from 5” maple. Bought a different new 1/4” Olson blade and was able to center the blade with no drift on 1/2” stock.
Went back to the first blade and had about the same problem. I guess the blade was the problem even though it was new. The blade looked alright but I am not sure what defect I’m looking for.
Snodgrass methods definitely work. Thanks for the the replies.

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#9 posted 04-13-2017 03:26 PM

I run 1/4” 4 TPI blades with a Carter Stabilizer about 95% of the time. I picked up the last round of blades from a local supplier. They were all Lenox blades. When they dull, they drift. At that point, I grab my angle drill and a Harbor Freight 1-1/2” diameter diamond grinder head and touch up the tops of each hook without worrying about angle. When I fire the blade up, it cuts like a banshee again, without drift.

I’ve done the same with my re-saw blades and it made all the difference you could hope for.

Mindful of the forgoing, it might be worthwhile to do the same on the questionable blade. All it takes is a light touch, while still on the machine.

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DrDirt

4413 posts in 3577 days


#10 posted 04-13-2017 03:34 PM


I m with Snodgras: Drift is a myth tied to bad set up. I use my stock fence with a piece of plywood against it and it gives me veneer. If the blade wandered, that wouldn t happen.

When I get drift, it s because the blade is dull or the tension is low.

- Kelly


Generally agree, but I have not had blades smaller than 3/8 cut truly straight. Suspect that with such a small area of the tire under tension, it cannot ride “flat” on the crown like my 1/2inch 3-TPI blade does.. which I use for resawing all the time.
Seems that when your blade gullet is almost 1/2 the width of the blade it is not as ‘stable’

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#11 posted 04-13-2017 05:05 PM

On tension, I barely pay attention to the gauge, other than that I always go to it for the minimum.

I run the guide all the way up, then push the blade from the side, to see how much deflection there is with little pressure. I might plunk it like a guitar string too. If memory serves, I look for about a half inch of deflection, with 12” of blade exposed, and listen for a solid thunk.

I’ll make a test cut and tighten the blade more, if I don’t like the feel.

Of course, the wider the blade, the less give there should be, and the more tension is needed.

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2779 days


#12 posted 04-13-2017 08:09 PM

I wouldn’t use less than a half inch blade and hope for good re-saw results. Just changes in the wood density would seem likely to deflect a 1/4” blade. More so if you push it too hard.

On the other hand, I can cut a lengthwise circle out of an eight inch piece of knoty cherry, then pull the plug from either side. That is using the Carter Stabilizer, which has only a single bearing support where the upper support would normally be located.

In the end, feed rate is a huge factor in how the blade will respond. So we have that, centering the gullet on the upper wheel, tension and blade sharpness.

I m with Snodgras: Drift is a myth tied to bad set up. I use my stock fence with a piece of plywood against it and it gives me veneer. If the blade wandered, that wouldn t happen.

When I get drift, it s because the blade is dull or the tension is low.

- Kelly

Generally agree, but I have not had blades smaller than 3/8 cut truly straight. Suspect that with such a small area of the tire under tension, it cannot ride “flat” on the crown like my 1/2inch 3-TPI blade does.. which I use for resawing all the time.
Seems that when your blade gullet is almost 1/2 the width of the blade it is not as stable

- DrDirt


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Alex101

21 posts in 1213 days


#13 posted 04-15-2017 04:52 PM

Alex Snodgrass is definately the way to tune your bandsaw. I have been recommending him ever since I firts saw his video and never had a problem since.
GET THE BEST TUNING FROM A BANDSAW ‘Alex Snodgrass of Carter Industries has an excellent video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU on a tune up method that works well.
Tuning is only that and nothing else. If you really want to get the very best use of your bandsaw on an ongoing basis, then the Steve Maskery DVD’s will show you far more and they are a real investment that you should own. http://www.workshopessentials.com/shop/ ’.
CHECKING BLADE TENSION – Flutter test Video’s -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chyo9chuwJs and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8zZuDosSy0
Carter blade Stabilizer – by Alex Snodgrass. https://youtu.be/w_tv7cm0-VU
This video shows how well a stabilizer works for smaller blades with the guide only above the table. I have one of these which works well. The back of the blade gullet is also on the centre line on the upper wheel as per his usual advice. Propduct Range – http://www.carterproducts.com/band-saw-products/band-saw-stabilizer
BUY BEST BLADES FROM ….. http://www.tuffsaws.co.uk/
TUNE WITH SOUND ? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPyc2iDQnOA&vl ( UNPROVEN )

Whenever you have put a blade on a bandsaw, ask yourself the following questions:-
....... are you managing to get the blade running freely and central on the top wheel ( without guides or rear bearing near the blade ) with the gullet of the teeth in the centre of the top wheel ? The exception would be with wider blades, as 1/2” and wider may not sit ‘centred’ on the top wheel).
That’s the first priority before closing in guides and thrust bearings. The blade will not be in the centre of the lower wheel as the manufacturer allows the top wheel to be adjusted and tilt to allow tuning.
Is the blade running vertical 90° to the table alignment, front and back as well as side to side?
Once the guides and bearings have been brought to the correct position, (not touching when the blade runs freely) is the blade remaining where it should be when run under power and switched on and off checking several times ?

Are you sure that the tension is correct, or as near as it can be. Each blade could be different, even if it is the same depth, so needs to be checked whenever changing blades.

If all these things are correct, then you should get a true cut unless you are trying to cut the wood too fast and it’s filling the teeth with sawdust and pushing the blade out of line and see if teeth are damaged in any way.
Finally, if you have used the blade before, make sure the teeth are clean, as sawdust will stick in the teeth gullet. Cleaning with a wire brush will result in a far better cut before starting a new job, but certainly on a regular basis.

Hope this may help someone on the other side of the poond
Malcolm

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

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