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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 10-30-2010 04:34 AM 1193 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


10-30-2010 04:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane modified broken slavaged

Maybe dropped and broken then slavaged? Modified to get next to the side of something?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Stanley-6-1-4-wood-plane-1910-NO-RESERVE-/290491575051?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43a2a5ab0b

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


19 replies so far

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#1 posted 10-30-2010 04:45 AM

I think it was modified to be used like a chisel plane Bob.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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jusfine

2405 posts in 2385 days


#2 posted 10-30-2010 04:49 AM

I like the stubby little guy… :)

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#3 posted 10-30-2010 04:59 AM

Looks like a “Smart Plane”

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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GaryL

1094 posts in 2290 days


#4 posted 10-30-2010 05:10 AM

I had the same thought as Jim. I wonder how well it works?

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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swirt

2116 posts in 2431 days


#5 posted 10-30-2010 05:17 AM

I didn’t check the pat dates but it is likely a No10 (Carriage makers Rabbet) that was dropped and the toe broke. It is a fairly common fate for those planes. They were weak in that region and seems like half of the ones I’ve seen have a repairweld/brase to the arch near the iron. Those are the ones that survived. The ones that didn’t got turned into shopmade bullnose planes like this one.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2574 days


#6 posted 10-30-2010 05:40 AM

looks nearly excacly as the same as Chris Scwarsz did to one
when they try to see how much a cast iron plane cuold hold up to
and to show the different from a steal plane
the test was done by using a hammer on them
its on his blog and I think the headline was anyone for a cheiselplane
and it was broken excacly the same place
it very well cuold be the same plane…..LOL

take care
Dennis

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#7 posted 10-30-2010 06:09 AM

What would you use it for? Seems like the grain would split out if you didn’t watch it awfully close :-((

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2574 days


#8 posted 10-30-2010 06:17 AM

Topa
if you have a rabbet that end in a corner
and you want to plane the last bit of it you use it instead of parring with a cheisel
and when you have got the tecnic you get a realy smooth look
but there is a great chance it will dig in to the wood so you never set the deeper than
the bottom of the plane and the way to use it , is pretty much like slicing a bread

Dennis

Edit : lie-nilsen make a small and a big cheisel plane
its not often you will have to use one
but if , its just one of those that its niiiice to have

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#9 posted 10-30-2010 06:20 AM

Maybe I should buy it, then I wouldn’t have to try to learn how to pare :-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2574 days


#10 posted 10-30-2010 06:34 AM

I think you shuold learn that Topa
normaly cheiselplanes that is seen is lowangle lol
all thow we have wooden cheiselplanes here in europe
that has 45 degree angle single iron

Dennis

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#11 posted 10-30-2010 06:36 AM

You are probably right. I can ride, rope and shoot; may as well learn to pare too ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2574 days


#12 posted 10-30-2010 06:51 AM

then you still be two infront of me if you do that ..LOL
I can shoot and make knots on a robe
but can´t ride and swing the robe

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#13 posted 10-30-2010 07:16 AM

Probably just as well. After yoiu catch a calf, the work begins ;-( Shots, dehorn, removal of the oysters…..

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2574 days


#14 posted 10-30-2010 09:08 PM

Topa have to ask what is oysters on a calf, the only I know of live in the occeans

have a little story to you from when I was a big boy
me and a freind from school worked on a farm in sommertime
between two school years and there they raised bullcalfs to the sloughterhouse
starting as small calf in one end of the building and when they reached the other end
as big 700-800 kg bulls they where ready for the pick up
the first time we had to move them 4 places in the stable (think no knowledge and imagine)
we just loosen them all and when they were loose they start to run around and every time
we got one the great panic started in the flok us boys didn´t realise how dangerus it was
until the farme get thrugh the door and change his read colour out with a scary white face …LOL
did take us the rest of the day to get every thing under control again
I´m still thinking he shuold have told us in the first place just to move one at a time

another little one from the same place
one of the mittle sice calf used to push to us with the head and filled horns if we turned the back to it
under the feading round one day it got too much for my buddy and he made a quick turn
and hit the calf with a shovel right between the horns realy hart
he just wanted that it shuold learn something of its own medic to know and it realy did…....the calf died
wasn´t so good after all it was money out of the window for the farmer

have a great day Topa :-)
Dennis

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#15 posted 10-30-2010 10:50 PM

The “Rocky Mountain Oysters” are the salvageable product of turning a bull calf into a steer.

I guess the farmer thought it was common knowledge not to turn them all loose at once ;-)) Not being raised on the farm, you wouldn’t know or think of it.

He must have hit that calf just right for that to happen. When they kill cattle at the slaughter house, they thump them right behind the poll on top of their head. That is the place where the horns grow out each side. I’m not a 100% sure it kills them or knocks them out for the process to begin.

When I was 18, I was milking 80 head for a neighbor. He just let a bull roam among the cows rather than control the breeding to get heifers to improve the herd. He came in the holding pen to the milk barn occasionally. One morning he came in, I smacked him on the rear end with a 2×4, which is what we did about once a month to keep him trained to stay out. It was really crowded in the holding pen, just enough room of all the cows packed in tight. I was between the bull’s rear end and the gate. When I smacked him, he whirled around to get out of there. He had horns about 6 inches long. As his head came around, I pushed back as far as I could and sucked in my belly. Those horns came past with about an inch to spare!! ;-(( I should have been paying a bit more attention to where I was standing, the bull’s position and the gate. He wasn’t trying to get me, he knew he’d done wrong and wanted out of there.

My dad had a Red Angus bull that would try to get you through a steel gate when you went past his pen. One day he was docile; then, his disposition changed. Lucky my dad didn’t get killed when it happened.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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