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Forum topic by WoodsmanWoodworker posted 10-29-2010 02:37 PM 3378 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2288 days


10-29-2010 02:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: blacksmithing making own tools

Alright, real quick here, i know it’s not woodworking, but it’s making tools for woodworking so i hope this topic stays up. It’s about what blacksmithing supplies i shuold get, like what are the basics, and what shuold i look into getting as i get better. I don’t have a lot of money to spend so anything makeshift is encouraged (later i can upgrade if needed). Making tools from wood and steel, i can imagine my enjoyment. Thanks everyone.

Here is what i think i need
1. anvil or substitute
2. forge with bellow
3. Blacksmithing hammer
4. leg/post vice
5. tongs

Here are a few pictures of items i think might be useful until i get better and can buy the better tools. Please comment and correct me, i want to know what’s good. The pics are big, but ones a car part, and the other steel I-beam peice. ( 12 in ruler for scale )

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~


10 replies so far

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2288 days


#1 posted 10-29-2010 03:03 PM

Its not that tools cost to much, just that i can’t find them, plus i like making my own tools, gives a satisfaction of making things with things you’ve made. Thanks
P.S. i just meant i don’t want to drop 100 dollars on an anvil that can be replaced with some free junk in the yard.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

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docholladay

1287 posts in 2525 days


#2 posted 10-29-2010 03:03 PM

A small forge can be built using nothing more than some fire brick and a map gas torch. It just depends on how large things you intend to work with. A small forge like this can be used for heat treating and annealing of most tool sized objects. No need for the bellows or blower. For info on this type of forge, simply Google for Micro Forge. Regardless, you can build your own forge. There is much information online about how to build a forge. Depending on the fuel you choose to use, you do need to be aware of potential hazards from fumes. As for the vise. You don’t necessarily have to have a leg vise. Any solid vise will work if mounted securely. If using the small map gas type forge, then you won’t necessarily need tongs. Just a good sized pair of pliers should be sufficient. If you want to get more involved, then you will definitely need a long pair of tongs. You need to do some research in learning how to control and recognize the temperature. Things such as, what approximate temperature is indicated by a certain color of flame or what color is a certain metal at given temperatures. Most of this information can also be found online as well.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2288 days


#3 posted 10-29-2010 04:11 PM

Well i’m thinking of making a carving knife, drawknife, spokeshave and maybe an adze (others too) with blacksmithing after i learn to do it. Thanks

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2551 days


#4 posted 10-29-2010 04:48 PM

From your site, you know about Roy Underhill. If you go to his on line site, you can view some blacksmithing
videos and get an idea of what you need and what you can do. A chunk of heavy I beam or railroad rail could
be a beginners anvil. A disc from a farm implement could be the base for a first forge. Start small and learn
and decide how far you want to go. Regular coal will work if you sprinkle it with some water while burning
if you can not get good anthracite-hard coal. You are young enough to learn. Have fun and enjoy the trip
otherwise it really does not make much sense.

As ever, Gus the 71 yr young laborer, trying to become a carpenters apprentice.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#5 posted 10-29-2010 04:54 PM

WW, I misunderstood you in your PM, I thought that you wanted a suggested list of a starting set of woodworking tools. Well, it doesn’t matter. The list might help anyways because you can make a good many of them.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#6 posted 10-29-2010 05:17 PM

I am only an amateur blacksmith and have played around with it. I’m a pretty good self-taught machinists. I bought my 75 lb anvil for around $70.00. I bought my post vise for $50.00. You can find hammers easily. I probably paid around 10 or 15 dollars each for some decent tongs. You can find some pretty decent chunks of steel in the junk yard for a substitute anvil and small anvils can be made out of railroad track. I have seen forges made out of old truck wheels. I would prefer the blacksmith coal. Firebricks are also fine. You can heat treat with a small torch and kitchen stove for the lower heat.

My favorite books for blacksmithing and toolmaking on a budget:

general blacksmithing

budget toolmaking

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2288 days


#7 posted 10-29-2010 05:23 PM

thanks

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 10-29-2010 05:29 PM

BTW, Alexander Weygers was the author of the second book and he was an avid woodcarver, woodworker, an stone sculptor. He made most of the tools that he used. WW, from the way that I’m hearing you, Alezander Weygers would be a man after your own heart.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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BTKS

1984 posts in 2930 days


#9 posted 10-30-2010 10:30 AM

PBS had a series on called Forge and Anvil. Started out talking about building your own forge, tongs and very basic skills. Heat levels and when to work mild steel, etc. I learned a lot from it! I also joined a Blacksmith Association but can only play with them one or two times a year. Pounding hot steel is instant gratification! There are several really good books on the market too. I haven’t done much online research but it has to be out there too.
Good luck, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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Jonnyfurniture

59 posts in 2293 days


#10 posted 10-31-2010 12:42 AM

Piece of railroad track, an old brake drum, blower with variable speed or adjustable gate, 2lb. cross peen hammer, coke, borax, some old nicholson files to make cutting tools out of, Supplys at Centaur Forge.
ABANA.org

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