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Forum topic by b2rtch posted 10-29-2010 12:31 AM 2748 views 3 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


10-29-2010 12:31 AM

Here the sheet-good handling cart I built last week.
I hope that you will find it as handy as I do and that it will save your back.

I am still struggling loading pictures but I hope that you will have a pretty good idea of what I did and how it works.. NO LIFTING

I spent time putting titles under each pictures to explain what you are looking at, but they are all gone, sorry.

-- Bert


14 replies so far

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2445 days


#1 posted 10-29-2010 02:04 AM

Neat idea Bert. I assume that this was meant to be an accessory for the lift table to make it marketable for a $150. While it requires less lifting than the drywall lift, I think the drywall lift would be more versital in the small shop. Sounds like you gave up the idea of selling your idea and I’m sorry to hear that. Give yourself a Attaboy on your idea and know at least your back won’t be hurting any more from lifting sheet goods. Very good idea I like your thinking though it didn’t pan out for you. Thanks for at least sharing with us.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3680 days


#2 posted 10-29-2010 02:31 AM

Very cool!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 10-29-2010 02:36 AM

Gregn you cannot use a drywall lift.
It defeats the purpose as you have to lift the sheet of plywood.
What would you use a drywall lift for in a wood shop?
The table lift is a better choice I think, this after noon I used it to move my bench and I can use to unload my trailer, thing that again I could not do with a drywall lift.
The whole thing cost me less than $150.00

-- Bert

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swirt

2117 posts in 2433 days


#4 posted 10-29-2010 02:46 AM

Very clever. I like it.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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jcwalleye

301 posts in 2534 days


#5 posted 10-29-2010 03:15 AM

Pretty clever. I can see you you wanted one. Nice job.

-- Trees, a wonderful gift --Joe--

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#6 posted 10-29-2010 03:23 AM

glivingston,no movie, sorry.

-- Bert

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3124 days


#7 posted 10-29-2010 03:43 AM

Bert—I’m with glivingston … this is far better than some of the tips I see in woodworking magazines.

Thanks for sharing!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2445 days


#8 posted 10-29-2010 05:09 AM

Sorry I didn’t realize the table lift was included in the price. I thought that the table lift was over a $125 alone. Guess I’m just not seeing the whole picture here. Still think its a great idea you have. Must be I’m looking to hard at portability in more confining space that I didn’t see the full advantage of your idea. Still I appreciate your sharing with us even though I didn’t grasp the complete concept right away.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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Steven H

1117 posts in 2521 days


#9 posted 10-29-2010 06:37 AM

How does it pick up plywood? First 90 degree turn and is it lift up by a metal shoved under plywood, kinda like a forklift? Also what did you use to connect the lift

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#10 posted 10-29-2010 06:58 AM

Good going bert well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#11 posted 10-29-2010 12:15 PM

Gregn, thank you.

” How does it pick up plywood?”
There is an angle iron ( made of aluminum) that I shove under the plywood when the table it vertical then I lay the whole table and sheet down and then I raise the table and sheet.

” Also what did you use to connect the lift” look on the pictures. the copper tubing on the bottom of the table rests in the brackets that I made and installed on the table lift. The table can be easily removed an time then I can use the table lift by itself.

-- Bert

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4166 posts in 2318 days


#12 posted 10-29-2010 12:19 PM

Great idea.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3549 days


#13 posted 10-29-2010 12:20 PM

I understood the whole process from your photos.
A really good aspect is that it also serves as an infeed table.

I also see how it is helpful in unloading the truck. Works just in reverse.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3134 days


#14 posted 10-29-2010 03:21 PM

Thats a neat idea.

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