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Carbide lathe tools-Ever make your own?

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Forum topic by StumpyNubs posted 1266 days ago 13173 views 19 times favorited 88 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StumpyNubs

5967 posts in 1299 days


1266 days ago

Ever see those lathe tools that have little replaceable carbide tips? Here’s a website that sells them for $120 each.

http://www.easywoodtools.com/EWT%20Master%20Retail.pdf

My question is, why couldn’t you just buy a piece of rolled steel rod, tap a hole and mount a cutter on the end and make your own wood handle? The cutters sell for just $13 each?

Everybody I’ve talked to that’s used these carbide tools love them, they say you get up to 80 hours of continous turning before they gut dull.

Ever used one? What did you think?

Ever considered making one?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com


88 replies so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4520 posts in 1573 days


#1 posted 1266 days ago

I have a couple and I think they are great. I’ve also wondered why one could not make them if they had some knowledge of metal working.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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StumpyNubs

5967 posts in 1299 days


#2 posted 1266 days ago

Even without metal working experience, they look to me like a simple rod that holds the cutting tip. A little time at the grinder to shape the end, and a carefully tapped hole to hold the cutter…

Perhaps I’m oversimplifying?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Chiefk's profile

Chiefk

163 posts in 2270 days


#3 posted 1265 days ago

Like knucklenut, I have one homemade with Grizzly cutters. It works great. pkennedy

-- P Kennedy Crossville, TN

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15543 posts in 2717 days


#4 posted 1265 days ago

Wow. And to think I have a couple hundred bucks invested in these! ;-(

Have any of you used the Grizzly cutters AND the Easy cutters to know how they compare in performance?

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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ChrisForthofer

150 posts in 1566 days


#5 posted 1265 days ago

Similarly, these could be made by simply buying the inserts and brazing them onto the end of a rod with silver solder. Insert gets dull, just re-heat, remove and either index it or replace it. I would recomend the solder method over just a screw as unless you are able to machine a somewhat precision pocket to hold the insert it will move/turn and possilbly damage your piece or worse, yourself. I am a machinist by trade and in a pinch this method is used to make custom form tools for metal lathes or mills. With a good solder bond, you’d be amazed at the abuse the tool assy. can take without failing in metal. I would be so bold as to say damn near imposible to break in wood. On a side note, this is the method they use to hold carbide tips on saw blades and router bits for those that didnt know already :)

Chris.

-- -Director of slipshod craftsmanship and attention deficit woodworking

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DanCo

66 posts in 1397 days


#6 posted 1265 days ago

After my first set of chisels started to not be enough, I started making all of my turning tools. If you get the right steel its easy. I even make the carbide tips, but I do have family and friends in the metal trades so it is easier for me. One of my neighbors is a farrier and a knife maker so I get his left overs and cutoffs too. It really is satisfying to use your own made tools.

-- Daniel

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ChrisForthofer

150 posts in 1566 days


#7 posted 1265 days ago

Knucklenut,

I am glad that has worked for you, I guess I was coming from the reference frame of my trade. Most inserted cutting tools use a very closely fit pocket to retain and control the insert in the cut. I was over-thinking a bit as the cutting forces involved in metal FAR exceed that experienced in wood. As long as the insert cant turn or shift which could loosen the screw (which it sounds like you have achieved quite well) which could quickly become unsafe. I love to build my own tools and have recently started making my own hand planes. I am glad there are others who enjoy the challenge and satisfaction (and cost savings!) in building useful tools.

Chris

-- -Director of slipshod craftsmanship and attention deficit woodworking

View newbiewoodworker's profile

newbiewoodworker

659 posts in 1326 days


#8 posted 1265 days ago

Chris: Its a bad idea to solder them on… I wouldnt hesitate to Tap them, or even Weld them(as you said… its cheap… when the cutter gets dull, chop off the end, tack on another… ) but not solder… not really enough heat involved, so thus the joint is weaker than the base metal, you want it as strong…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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StumpyNubs

5967 posts in 1299 days


#9 posted 1265 days ago

For those who have used these carbide cutters, how long do they last before they become dull?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3395 posts in 2233 days


#10 posted 1265 days ago

I’ve seen round carbide cutters with a 15-degree undercut that would be perfect for a handheld toolholder. Would be great for final smoothing, better than scraping, maybe! I’ll just bet the carbide would last a long long time. They attach to machine-shop toolholders with a #8-32 allen-head screw.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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ChrisForthofer

150 posts in 1566 days


#11 posted 1265 days ago

Newbie,

We do it on nearly a weekly basis at work and then cut aircraft parts with them after its done. Its how your carbide tips are held on your saw blades, carbide on your router bits. Its beyond common and perfectly safe and beyond strong. And when I say beyond strong, I mean it. I’ve seen the carbide fail due to bad feeds and speeds and it never fails at the solder joint. Silver solder is not electrical solder, it requires much higher temps to melt and its mechanical properties are NOTHING like lead or tin solders. Some call it brazing, our toolmakers always refer to it as silver soldering. 13 years of using these tools in my trade successfully has more than demonstrated their safety.

Chris.

-- -Director of slipshod craftsmanship and attention deficit woodworking

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poopiekat

3395 posts in 2233 days


#12 posted 1264 days ago

Here’s a view of some carbide inserts that can be adapted to a toolholder of your own making. You can scroll this catalog pages and get an idea. These carbide inserts are just a bit bigger than your thumbnail, and I have used them for woodworking in the past. They’re deadly sharp! And last a long time. Sorry, I couldn’t find any round ones, like the one I used. A single screw thru the center hole is all you need. I remember it was great for hogging out bowls FAST!
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=176&PMCTLG=00

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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StumpyNubs

5967 posts in 1299 days


#13 posted 1264 days ago

poopie- Wow, thanks for the link!

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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Dautterguy

14 posts in 2260 days


#14 posted 1264 days ago

Ladies and Gentlemen, If you go to www.Gobal Tooling.net then look in the Carbide Insert Knives, they are listed @ $1.87 ea. both with a radius and straight. I have purchased before from them.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3395 posts in 2233 days


#15 posted 1264 days ago

No problem, jim!
Enco used to have an outlet in North Andover, Massachusetts years ago when I lived in that area. In fact, I bought my first 14” Bandsaw from them, was just the typical branded import identical to Delta…$159. Used it for years. Enco always used to be THE place to get machine-shop supplies, and often had specials on store-brand woodworking tools. Great place for us tinkerers!!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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