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Clamping wood set at an angle

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 04-08-2017 05:05 PM 906 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5086 posts in 3391 days


04-08-2017 05:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joining

When clamping for a glue-up, how do I clamp 2 pieces of wood set at an angle as shown? The glued surfaces slide and any clamping pressure wants to move the angled piece.


18 replies so far

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2636 posts in 1088 days


#1 posted 04-08-2017 05:13 PM

Not sure of the dimensions of the components, but dowels would hold it in place.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Rich

3666 posts in 737 days


#2 posted 04-08-2017 05:20 PM

You could build a jig with one leg set at the angle of the joint. Rather than clamping the wood pieces together directly, you will clamp the pieces to the jig with the glue joint firmly closed up. You can use something to tap the end of the angle board to make sure it’s flush to the other board.

If the boards are wide, you’ll probably want two jigs.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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builtinbkyn

2636 posts in 1088 days


#3 posted 04-08-2017 05:22 PM

Just thought of another option – use a fence clamped to the bottom component. Maybe put some wax paper between the components so the squeeze out doesn’t bond the fence too.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5126 posts in 2414 days


#4 posted 04-08-2017 05:27 PM

Use rubber bands and a scrap for the holders. Wax paper along side anything you do NOT want to be part of it also a good idea.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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MrRon

5086 posts in 3391 days


#5 posted 04-08-2017 05:37 PM

The problem is; I can’t apply enough clamping pressure at the glued joint without the piece sliding off the mark. Obviously when the angle becomes greater, it becomes impossible to clamp. I’m aware of using jigs, but I would like to know if there is a “trick” I don’t know about. I’ve used jigs before, but it takes a lot of time to accurately build a jig that will do the job.

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jerryminer

944 posts in 1589 days


#6 posted 04-08-2017 05:50 PM

Clamping blocks will keep things in position and allow pressure to be directed in the right direction:

Be sure to use a “release”—I like clear packaging tape, but paste wax works too—- to keep the blocks from getting stuck to the project.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View JayCee123's profile

JayCee123

200 posts in 912 days


#7 posted 04-08-2017 05:57 PM

I know …no jigs !!!!!
I’ve used this method when i didn’t have the “energy” to clamp on a fence to to one piece to keep the other from sliding.
I get the smallest brad gun I have and shoot a couple of brads into one of the boards leaving the brad heads proud of the board. Then I take a nail nipper and cut the brads as close as possible to the surface. That will leave the remaining brad shaft protruding slightly proud of the surface. Apply glue to both pieces and firmly press together the remaining brad stubs will be captured by the second piece and will keep the second board from sliding across the surface of the other. Apply you clamps or bands. Your joint should be true enough not to require so much pressure that you squeeze the glue out of the joint and starve the joint. If they still slide … use a clamped on fence.
I’ve also experimented with sand but haven’t had better results.

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GnarlyErik

312 posts in 2282 days


#8 posted 04-08-2017 05:59 PM

The main idea is to clamp your stock to another parallel surface. I encounter this quite often, and there is a simple solution: Just cut yourself a clamping piece which includes the angles. This can be a piece of scrap, such as a bit of 3/4” plywood, clamped at right angles to each piece of your stock. Depending on the length of the stock you are glueing, you may need more than one. See my sketch:

-- "Never let your dogma be run over by your karma!"

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2636 posts in 1088 days


#9 posted 04-08-2017 06:09 PM

This is what I was referring to. But there are a few ways, as mentioned in the responses, and some can be combined, such as using brads as cleats along with the clamping blocks.

I always thought this is what dowels are for ;) They really don’t provide much strength and an argument can be made that they actually weaken a joint. However, they do provide for alignment of components when that’s critical.


Clamping blocks will keep things in position and allow pressure to be directed in the right direction:

Be sure to use a “release”—I like clear packaging tape, but paste wax works too—- to keep the blocks from getting stuck to the project.

- jerryminer


-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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MrRon

5086 posts in 3391 days


#10 posted 04-08-2017 06:44 PM

Jerry Miner, Yours is the only one that addresses glue joint pressure. I was building a storage rack that needed a 3/4×2-1/2×12 long piece glued at an angle as shown in my sketch. I applied the glue, slid it around until it became not slippery and tried to drive a brad with a nail gun. Needing to apply pressure so the brad would penetrate completely without leaving a gap, the piece would slide out of position. This was only a small non structural project, but if strength was a factor, I would do something different, like dado a groove at an angle.

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runswithscissors

2843 posts in 2173 days


#11 posted 04-08-2017 10:07 PM

Never mind.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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papadan

3584 posts in 3516 days


#12 posted 04-08-2017 10:20 PM

I use my adjustable square as a bracket to clamp the 2 pieces together.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1149 posts in 2100 days


#13 posted 04-09-2017 12:37 AM

I am certain that the only way out of this dilemma is to dump a ton of money in a Festool “domino” system.

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Bobmedic

381 posts in 2950 days


#14 posted 04-09-2017 01:18 AM

Use CA glue in several spots along the length with activator on the adjacent piece. The CA glue will grab until you can add some light clamping pressure.

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DaleM

958 posts in 3532 days


#15 posted 04-09-2017 02:59 AM

Cut a groove or dado in the bottom board that is the same width as the top board and at the same angle you need. Make sure to make the width of the top board wider to add the depth of the dado. If you do that, it can’t possibly slide no matter how you clamp it.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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