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How to remove a hex bolt that is jammed on an old craftsmen table saw

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Forum topic by jtrz posted 04-08-2017 03:58 PM 2246 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtrz

65 posts in 1011 days


04-08-2017 03:58 PM

I bought an old craftsmen 10” direct drive (model number 113.221720) a few months back and am finally getting around to getting into the best shape I can. Unfortunately, I think the body of it may be slightly twisted from the abuse of being a jobsite saw. I was trying to take the table extensions off last night and the last one is completely stuck.

And in my frustration last night the head got stripped. Any ideas on how to get this thing out without damaging the saw even more?

The saw may be more trouble than its worth especially if the frame is twisted. It’s also missing things like the knobs for blade adjustment and probably much more. I got it cheap and was hoping I could get it into decent shape.

So what do you all think: is this not worth my time and should I just start looking for another saw? I don’t need a great saw. I don’t have a lot of money to spend and am not looking for anything remotely fancy. I just want to be able to rip boards down and then I will clean up the edge with a router.

Jeff


15 replies so far

View oldsailor59's profile

oldsailor59

51 posts in 268 days


#1 posted 04-08-2017 04:09 PM

for removing stuck bolt
first try vise grips. if that fails, drill a hole in the center of the bolt and use an Easy Out, you will need a M35 or M42 cobalt steel drill bit to make a hole in the bolt.
as far as bent frame and such, only you can say if it is worth the effort.
to help prevent stuck bolts in the future, always coat threads with a good anti-seize before assembly

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#2 posted 04-08-2017 04:22 PM

Vice grips like Scott said. Really clamp them on there and then give it a whack with a wood mallet or soft blow hammer to break it loose.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Using 6-point sockets (or wrenches) instead of 12-point ones will prevent you from rounding them over.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1307 days


#3 posted 04-08-2017 04:38 PM

You could also use a dremel or a grinder to put new flats on the sides of the bolt head.

Honestly, saws like this show up constantly on my local craigslist and I’ve even seen tools (not table saws, though) in similar condition at goodwill for a few dollars. I think the previous owners of all those realized that it’s not worth the effort for a tool that’s already pretty junk to begin with.

I think if someone gave me a brand-new direct-drive saw for free I would still junk it.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 778 days


#4 posted 04-08-2017 05:18 PM

Try some penetrating oil (DW40) and then the above advice. Also, the extension may be sagging, putting pressure on the bolt. Try using some support under it or clamps to relieve the pressure, be fore trying to extract it.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1683 days


#5 posted 04-08-2017 07:25 PM

I got one of these hand impact kits and have been really surprised at how well it works. You can use any bit in the one I have.

https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-29200-Hand-Impact-Tool/dp/B0002NYDRG/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1491679421&sr=8-11&keywords=impact+wrench+to+loosen+bolts

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

65 posts in 1011 days


#6 posted 04-08-2017 07:41 PM

The extension definitely is either sagging or is twisted. As a result, the bolt got twisted with it most likely. The previous owner probably has it stored away and a bunch of heavy materials got stored on top of it.

Vice grips won’t work because of the location of the bolt and because the head is recessed. I got an easy out so I am going to go try and drill this sucker out.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#7 posted 04-08-2017 07:50 PM

If it’s cast iron, DO NOT try an impact driver or hit the bolt with a hammer. Unless you know how to weld cast iron. Just drill it out, probably only grade 5 and drills easy.

View oldsailor59's profile

oldsailor59

51 posts in 268 days


#8 posted 04-08-2017 09:34 PM


I think if someone gave me a brand-new direct-drive saw for free I would still junk it.

- William Shelley

let me send you my address when you are ready to junk it(LOL).
all seriousness aside, if you shop, you can find a basic contractor’s table saw for less than $150. CPO oulets has one today for $125 http://www.cpooutlets.com/factory-reconditioned-ryobi-zrrts10g-15-amp-10-in--table-saw-with-steel-stand/ryorzrrts10g,default,pd.html

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18630 posts in 2521 days


#9 posted 04-08-2017 11:42 PM

Bolt bent…can you get a sawzall blade between the wing and the saw? Thin metal cutting blade. Saw the bolt in two, and remove.

My Late Dad had one of these saws for a LONG time, still sitting in my Mom’s basement. 8” direct drive Craftsman.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

65 posts in 1011 days


#10 posted 04-09-2017 12:36 AM

I’m going to look it over tonight and decide if it is going to the scrap heap or back to craigslist. If the blade can give me a right angle and stays that way after a few cuts I will consider keeping it. I’m sure the fence isn’t in great shape and probably was never very good so I will need to come up with a solution for that. A fence that is square and blade that is square is my main priority. I’m not going to be cutting any super hard wood. Mostly pine and poplar.

$125 is definitely the right price but I’d rather get this thing working and get a planar.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2564 posts in 1863 days


#11 posted 04-09-2017 03:59 AM

If a socket will grip the bolt head, you might have some luck with an impact driver. There are adaptors that will give you a 1/4” or 3/8” socket driver. But there might not be room to get the driver in there. Of course, if you are willing to bend the sheet metal wing, you might be able to do it.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AlGar's profile

AlGar

9 posts in 268 days


#12 posted 04-09-2017 02:33 PM

Get a bolt removal socket designed for stripped bolt heads. It is the opposite of an Easy-Out, which is used for removing fasteners using a hole in the fastener. These special sockets are available at any auto parts stores. I have used them when all else fails. They can’t be beat for removing a bolt with a stripped head.

-- Ohio Alan

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

2068 posts in 2026 days


#13 posted 04-09-2017 02:53 PM

I had a similar problem. Already lots of great solutions.

Seized nuts bolts and screws.
PB blaster. Get yourself a can and you will never reach for the WD-40 or penetrating oil again.

Stripped screw head. Machine bolt with sheared head.
So far my Irwin screw extractor has worked fine on hardened metal. I had a failure on the cheaper metal.

Bolt and nut spinning or bent.
4 inch grinder with a metal grinding wheel. Say goodbye. You can cut the bolt in two pieces, completely remove the head or even cut through both the nut and bolt.

Best of luck!

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2564 posts in 1863 days


#14 posted 04-09-2017 07:50 PM

Expanding on my post above: an extension—6” or 8” or even longer—would let you get a socket wrench on there with your impact driver (I mean 12 or 18 volt type, not the kind you pound on)

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Markmh1's profile

Markmh1

62 posts in 281 days


#15 posted 04-12-2017 01:09 AM

Please don’t think of me as a butcher.

Get a healthy dose of heat on it.
If you can get a 6 point socket (the correct size) to kinda start, get a big hammer, take the skirt off, and drive the socket on. Put on your fanciest breaker bar and giv’er a good twist. If it twists off, drill out the center of the stud, get some heat on it, and let an ez-out do it’s magic.

Another sure-fire way is to get a chisel on it and try to shear it off. (This is not a cast iron friendly method.)

Put the vise-grips in your back pocket. You’ll need them to pick up the hot pieces.

Good luck.

Mark

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