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glass for chisel sharpening

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Forum topic by buckbuster31 posted 04-07-2017 03:16 PM 880 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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buckbuster31

203 posts in 355 days


04-07-2017 03:16 PM

where has everyone gotten their piece of glass to flatten chisel? can I use the top of my table saw as a replacement for the sandpaper to sit on?


20 replies so far

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Ron Aylor

1791 posts in 487 days


#1 posted 04-07-2017 03:30 PM

Sure as long as it’s flat … which I’m sure it is! I picked up a scrape piece of glass from Lowes for free … it was cut wrong and they were going to throw it out!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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buckbuster31

203 posts in 355 days


#2 posted 04-07-2017 03:32 PM

how thick does the glass need to be

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Ron Aylor

1791 posts in 487 days


#3 posted 04-07-2017 03:41 PM

Mine appears to be a bit over 1/8 of an inch … I would assume as long as the glass is resting on a flat surface and doesn’t crack when pressure is applied a regular window pane thickness would work. All that counts is the surface is flat … for that matter a smooth piece of tile/granite could be used instead of glass. I think sometimes we over engineer these things …

My sharpening system is on a flat board … the glass in the middle under the sandpaper has been there for years …
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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HorizontalMike

7664 posts in 2753 days


#4 posted 04-07-2017 03:52 PM

I suggest going to the HD or other big box store and buy a single 12×12inch granite tile for $5.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/MS-International-Absolute-Black-12-in-x-12-in-Polished-Granite-Floor-and-Wall-Tile-10-sq-ft-case-TABSBLK1212/202508270

I would suggest that you would/will spend more than that on GAS trying to find a better deal. Mine works great.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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IndianaWoodworker

25 posts in 1489 days


#5 posted 04-07-2017 04:02 PM

I concur with HorizontalMike…while I have sharpening stones for my chisels and plane irons, I use three 12”x12” granite floor tiles to restore hand planes I find at various flea markets. These work great for me and they’re a lot more durable than glass.

-- Measure twice, cut once?!? But, cutting is more fun than measuring!

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buckbuster31

203 posts in 355 days


#6 posted 04-07-2017 04:53 PM

what grit sandpaper would everyone start with?

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BurlyBob

5068 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 04-07-2017 05:13 PM

I went super cheap and got several granite scraps from a counter top shop for nothing.

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JayT

5455 posts in 2050 days


#8 posted 04-07-2017 06:01 PM



I went super cheap and got several granite scraps from a counter top shop for nothing.

- BurlyBob

That was my route, as well.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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IndianaWoodworker

25 posts in 1489 days


#9 posted 04-07-2017 08:38 PM



what grit sandpaper would everyone start with?

- buckbuster31

Well…it kind of depends on what you need to accomplish. If you need to take off a lot of material because, say, there’s a back bevel on your chisel, then you would probably want to start off with something coarse…an 80 or 120. If you just need to do a quick honing, then you’d want to use a 1000 or higher.

-- Measure twice, cut once?!? But, cutting is more fun than measuring!

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BenDupre

531 posts in 327 days


#10 posted 04-07-2017 10:34 PM

+1 for marble tile. Check it with a straight edge first, just to be sure. You can use the table saw top if it’s a cast-iron top. I have used my table saw for plane flattening, but that’s done dry. I would be wary of putting water or cutting fluid on it. When I flattened my plane sole I taped up the mouth because I didn’t want grit getting into the saw.

I can tell you from recent experience that sandpaper sharpening seems cheap but it get expensive quickly if you buy the paper at the big box. Try online (sorry I have no resource for you). I just bought a set of DMT plates and realized that I could have almost paid for them if I had started out that way.

BTW – best advice I got from LJ on sharpening? Watch Paul Sellers do it on youtube. He’ll go over everything you need to know.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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JayCee123

196 posts in 604 days


#11 posted 04-07-2017 10:53 PM

Lately I’ve been picking up marble or granite floor tile at HD. Apply spray adhesive to the sharpening film or paper and stick to the tile. Been experimenting with the 12×24 tile. Gives me more room to run my blade holder back and forth without falling of the edge. I store a few tiles with different sanding films applied and ready. Oh, while your in HD, take a walk over to the wood flooring isle, pick up a few of the pre-cut flooring samples, they make great sanding blocks. I really like the samples that have cork on one side and hardwood on the other. The cork side works nice for sanding a curved edge and the hardwood side great for flattening.

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BurlyBob

5068 posts in 2105 days


#12 posted 04-08-2017 12:27 AM

Buck as far as grits. I’ve got a piece of granite with a piece of 220, 320, 600, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 2500 on it.
I’ve also got 4 longer pieces of granite with 220, 320 and 600 for plane soles, irons and chisels. If a chisel just needs a touch up I used the piece with all the grits. 20-30 strokes on each and I’m good to go. I recently had to really work of a badly chipped chisel and ended up just getting rid of the chip on my stationary sander. That is with the sander turned off. I put it in my Veritas guide and ran it across the 100 grit belt. Every now and then you have to used those courser grits. It just depends on the condition of the chisel or iron.

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corelz125

314 posts in 815 days


#13 posted 04-08-2017 02:32 AM

I went the dumpster dive route myself for a piece of granite cutoff from a stone fabricator. I bought rolls of porter cable psa sandpaper .

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DrDirt

4414 posts in 3582 days


#14 posted 04-10-2017 07:47 PM

I wouldn’t use the top of my table saw. It is plenty flat, however you will want to use some water with the sandpaper….Cast Iron not happy and makes a mess of fine metal powder.

I got glass from a glass shop in town… think it cost me 8 bucks for a piece of tempered glass, and they sanded the edges round for me.

I keep it in a baking pan so it collects the water, and schmutz

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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TheFridge

8333 posts in 1325 days


#15 posted 04-10-2017 08:09 PM

I haven’t met a truly flat saw top yet. Granite sink cut out for me. It was free and thick.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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