LumberJocks

Table Saw Ripping Poor Cuts (PLEASE HELP)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Brett Lowing posted 10-28-2010 01:45 AM 1642 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


10-28-2010 01:45 AM

I have a Ridgid 10 in. CAST IRON TABLE SAW TS3650 and have tried both of these blades:
Diablo 10 in. x 24 Tooth Carbide Circular Saw Blade
Diablo 10 in. x 40 Tooth Carbide Circular Saw Blade
with the same results.

I have spent hours making sure the table saw has been set up precisely and have minimized the damage to the wood to the picture shown.

PLEASE HELP!!!
Am I missing something?

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius


21 replies so far

View Walt's profile

Walt

213 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 10-28-2010 01:51 AM

Brett
I can’t view any picture. What is the basic problem? Burning of the wood, tear out or inaccuracy of the line.
The 24 in blade is more for ripping and the 40 can be either a ripping , cross cut or combination blade
The speed that you move your stock also makes a difference.

-- Walt Wilmington Delaware, http://waltlumley@yahoo.com

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2386 days


#2 posted 10-28-2010 01:53 AM

Where is the picture and just what is the problem?
I have a 3650

-- Life is good.

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#3 posted 10-28-2010 01:54 AM

Here’s the image. It’s showing the blade arc.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#4 posted 10-28-2010 02:04 AM

It’s the front edge of the blade leaving the damage when I rip and I can’t seem to eliminate it.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3126 days


#5 posted 10-28-2010 02:49 AM

Maybe the blade isn’t parallel to the fence?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#6 posted 10-28-2010 03:01 AM

What kind of tolerances are there for it to be considered parallel? I used a combination-square to set everything parallel. Started with the blade to the table, then the fence to the table, then checked the fence to the blade. It’s pretty dang close to perfect if not perfect.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3111 days


#7 posted 10-28-2010 03:02 AM

can you detail what you mean by ”I have spent hours making sure the table saw has been set up precisely”?

I can only assume you have tuned the blade parallel to the miter gauge, and the fence parallel to the miter gauge as well so that everything is perfectly aligned? if not – that’s a good change to be the cause

did you check for arbor runout? if it’s too much it can cause the blade to not run true and wobble just enough to cause what you’re seeing

did you check for blade deflection? if the blade is not flat it’ll wobble and can create aftereffects such as you are seeing

are these thin kerf blades? if so, you might want to try using a blade stiffener.

thats all I can think of at the moment.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#8 posted 10-28-2010 03:29 AM

I’ve tuned the blade parallel to the miter gauge, and the fence parallel to the miter gauge as well so that everything is perfectly aligned. (Just took me a while to get perfect)

I don’t have a dial indicator to properly check for arbor runout. I set my combination-square against the front of the blade and turned it and notice a very minor difference when turning. I feel like this may be my issue. Can you explain more on this? Should I get a dial indicator?

I laid a straight edge against all the different blades I’ve tried and they are all flat.

The blades are Freud Diablo Brand from Home Depot (laser cut thin kerf design) But the result is the same from all of them, so it’s not the blades.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1094 posts in 2293 days


#9 posted 10-28-2010 03:33 AM

In my jobsite saw, I get the same cut with Diablo blades. I think it is just a product quality issue. I consider Diablos as throw away blades. But I do know that some LJ’s get satisfactory results with their Diablos. Try upgrading to a Freud Industrial and see how that does. I’m assuming this is not your cabinet shop saw.
If you have a higher quality blade in your shop or perhaps can borrow one, throw it on and see how it does.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#10 posted 10-28-2010 03:39 AM

I’ve been using those blades for about 4 years now with no problems as my cabinet shop saw. I’ve recently moved my equipment across the country and probably incurred some misalignment. But I would definitely consider purchasing a high quality blade.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3024 days


#11 posted 10-28-2010 03:39 AM

In order to get cuts to the perfection you are looking for you need to get the blade/fence alignment to within 0.002 from front to back. The best way to do it is with a dial indicator and a jig to slide it from front to back in the miter slot. I have a paper that explains it in detail. If you want it, send me a PM.

-- Joe

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1094 posts in 2293 days


#12 posted 10-28-2010 03:42 AM

Maybe go through the whole saw, trunnions, base, motor mount, etc to make sure nothing has worked loose during transport.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#13 posted 10-28-2010 03:43 AM

That’s some good advice! I sent you my e-mail address.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#14 posted 10-28-2010 03:52 AM

I did go through and make sure everything was tight. Thanks though!

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

View Brett Lowing's profile

Brett Lowing

23 posts in 2231 days


#15 posted 10-28-2010 03:55 AM

I’m going to purchase a dial indicator and go from there. Hopefully I can get this thing figured out! Thanks for all the help! I’ll let you know what comes of it.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com