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EXTERIOR DOORS- FRONT DOOR & DOUBLE DUTCH OR FRENCH STYLE BACK DOOR

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Forum topic by Tim posted 04-06-2017 04:23 AM 1813 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tim

5 posts in 250 days


04-06-2017 04:23 AM

Topic tags/keywords: diy front door double dutch door dutch door exterior door arts and crafts traditional question

Hello all,
I am new to this site so patience is appreciated. Wife and I are in process of renovating home from top to bottom down to the studs. We are trying to use as much reclaimed materials as possible for the interior. Two exceptions are the front door and the cak door. The house is located in Iowa…cooler climate. After looking at hundreds of exterior doors it seems the ones we both like are the most expensive, for all three “perfect doors” we loved cost was 10,000 plus. I’m thinking of trying to build the doors myself. My skills are woodworking skills are mid-intermediate.

Thoughts or input?
Any suggestions where I can get plans or resources to build my own doors?

Thanks for reading post and any input.
tim

-- Tim, Arizona & Iowa


14 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#1 posted 04-06-2017 05:11 AM

Welcome aboard Tim. Need more info on the style doors you want to be able to help much. Is there a plain solid door you could buy and modify into what you want. That would take care of the most of the basic build for you.

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pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#2 posted 04-06-2017 08:31 AM

If you want to do arts and crafts style practice making haunched tenons(sp). Use quarter sawn oak for the frame. Make the doors 1,1/2” thick so most hardware can fit. Dutch doors are notoriously drafty. I live in Indiana and removed ours a year after my wife pitched a fit to have me put one in for her. It kept the entry way too cold. If you want fancy Dan stuff you will need a 1/2’ chuck router of 1,1/2 hp or more and a table for it and a door makers set. That will put you back about 12oobucks min. You can sure make some pretty doors with it however.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#3 posted 04-06-2017 08:32 AM

If you want to do arts and crafts style practice making haunched tenons(sp). Use quarter sawn oak for the frame. Make the doors 1,1/2” thick so most hardware can fit. Dutch doors are notoriously drafty. I live in Indiana and removed ours a year after my wife pitched a fit to have me put one in for her. It kept the entry way too cold. If you want fancy Dan stuff you will need a 1/2’ chuck router of 1,1/2 hp or more and a table for it and a door makers set. That will put you back about 1200 bucks min. You can sure make some pretty doors with it however.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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Tim

5 posts in 250 days


#4 posted 04-06-2017 06:17 PM

i’m thinking Arts and Crafts or Mission style front door and for the back door, I would like double dutch doors or french doors, with as much glass as possible.Here are a few examples of front and back doors. Below are a few examples we found online. For well built quality door we are looking at 3k for the front and almost 6!for the double dutch doors.
Are these projects doable?

-- Tim, Arizona & Iowa

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Tim

5 posts in 250 days


#5 posted 04-06-2017 06:18 PM

-- Tim, Arizona & Iowa

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Tim

5 posts in 250 days


#6 posted 04-06-2017 06:18 PM

-- Tim, Arizona & Iowa

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Tim

5 posts in 250 days


#7 posted 04-06-2017 06:19 PM

-- Tim, Arizona & Iowa

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pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#8 posted 04-06-2017 08:08 PM

Do you have a router table and a 1/2” collet router? First you will need that. Then you will need the Door making set with the profile you like. Then you will need to have a design and a set of plans for it. The glass can be gotten from any professional glass shop near you. I would get the glass first and do the mullions or frame around them not the other way around. Then build the threshold around the door. A shaper table with spindle mount cutters is best for the large profiles you are going to need to do. You should use double raised panels with a piece of thin insulation between them. You will need to finish it with spar varnish or polyester for UV protection. I think it’s looking like you need to take a trip to some recycler of old Church and commercial doors qand pick out ones that will fit your needs and refinish and repair them it will be the most cost effective way to go.

The last “FancyDan” exterior Door I made was out of Cherry and cost me 1130 bucks for materials and took 25 manhours and I already had all the necessary tools. The Nitrogen filled triple pain glass alone was 350 bucks.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

798 posts in 1275 days


#9 posted 04-06-2017 08:29 PM

Building doors is not too mysterious, but you will need to be able to:

1. Prep the stock well (to get the material flat, straight, square)
2. Cut the joinery (M&T is best, but other methods work, too)
3. Assemble flat and square
4. Finish and install.

Standard thickness for an exterior door is 1 3/4”. Door hardware is made to accommodate this. You can go “off road” but you may have hardware issues if you do.

Double Dutch doors would be a lesson in frustration, IMHO, for someone new to building/installing doors. They are very unforgiving and installation is very fussy. A pair of French doors would be much simpler.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Rich's profile

Rich

1975 posts in 423 days


#10 posted 04-06-2017 08:57 PM

I’ve built many interior and exterior doors. I did a blog about the interior doors for the house and a short project entry for my latest entry door. I can say that those photos you posted represent extremely advanced techniques. Keep in mind that exterior doors are 1-3/4” thick, so you’ll need the horsepower to mill that. The final piece — door alone — will weigh over 80 lbs, making it very difficult to manage. It also means you’ll need at least 2” tenons on the rails and the ability to cut the mortises in the stiles to provide the strength in the joints to support that load. I could go on and on about the difficulties of trying to build one of those for your first door project.

Sorry to be a buzzkill, but I honestly can’t offer much encouragement given what I know about all that’s involved. You need to get some interior doors under your belt and go from there.

Oh, and Pontic is right about the cost of glass. I’ve had bids all the way from $60 to $150 for a 6” x 24” glass insert, which I need 5 of for the design I’m working on.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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jbay

1852 posts in 733 days


#11 posted 04-06-2017 09:18 PM

Just in the way of the Glass!

Glass prices are like supermarkets, call 3 different ones and get 3 different prices.

You have to compare apples to apples.
Low E glass? Are they filled with Argon Gas, Krypton Gas?
Are they sealed with Polysulphide? Butyl? Silicone?
Not to mention the type of window spacers, thickness, or desiccant filling them.
An insulted window is not just an insulated window.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#12 posted 04-07-2017 01:55 AM

Look for recycled doors in DesMoines.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#13 posted 04-07-2017 02:01 AM

Yeah, Nitro filled glass is the bottom end of the Low E triple market. Sealed with Silicone polyvinyl spacers.
3/16” tempered Rockford Glass. Big Deal.
Oh the Amana cove profile 1,3/4” rail and style door set for my shaper was 750 bucks back in 2001. They don’t make a collet type 1,3/4” door set only spindle mount. Trying to cut an inch and three quarter profile with a 1/2” collet is dicey at best and that is probably why they don’t make them. Not to mention the difficulty in getting them to run true. So you will need a shaper. Thay being said I have seen some bitchin doors made of 3/4 marine grade plywood and bondo glue laminated together and the edges sealed with
Bondo they all had beveled profiled panels and were painted but they looked clean and nice.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8026 posts in 2411 days


#14 posted 04-07-2017 02:15 AM

Sounds like you need a confidence builder. Maybe make an interior door first to see if it’s something

you really want to do.

I took an older door apart and it had 6 dowels in the bottom rail, 4 dowels in the middle rail and 2 dowels in

the top rail in each side and it lasted for decades, pretty good for an entrance door.

So you can do it if you really want to. Great advice above as well.

Congrats on your renovation and a belated welcome to Lumber Jocks.

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