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Forum topic by Rrrandy posted 04-05-2017 12:44 AM 579 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rrrandy

212 posts in 315 days


04-05-2017 12:44 AM

Does anyone know if sanding a magnet affects it’s “potency”? I drilled a hole and glued the magnet in. I failed to allow for the glue and my magnet sits about 1/128 proud of the surface.

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...


11 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#1 posted 04-05-2017 12:50 AM

Time for you to answer your question for the rest of us. LOL

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 738 days


#2 posted 04-05-2017 12:58 AM

Easy now , Magnets have been a very controversial subject in the past. I sanded down some rare earth magnets flush to some wood. No change in potency .

View SawduztJunky's profile

SawduztJunky

71 posts in 995 days


#3 posted 04-05-2017 01:00 AM

Yes, magnets can be machined. However, hard magnet materials are extremely difficult to machine, unlike flexible or rubber-type magnet materials. Magnets should be machined in the demagnetized state as much as possible (if possible) using diamond tools and/or soft grinding wheels, as temperature will have a negative effect on magnet strength.
Factors that can affect a magnet’s strength include:
Heat
Radiation
Strong electrical currents in close proximity to the magnet
Other magnets in close proximity to the magnet
Neo magnets will corrode in high humidity environments unless they have a protective coating.

-- I don't think I'm ever more "aware" than I am right after I hit my thumb with a hammer. Questions about solid surface? Just ask. http://www.swiiitch.portfoliobox.net

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2781 days


#4 posted 04-05-2017 03:36 AM

Rare earth magnets HATE heat. That aside, yes, they can be sanded, but you don’t want to get them hot or it will affect their pull.

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 315 days


#5 posted 04-05-2017 03:38 AM

I would like to thank everyone for their response…except papadan. :)

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 315 days


#6 posted 04-05-2017 04:27 AM

Just as an FYI I needed to find a very thin piece of metal for the opposite side of my very small magnet which is 1/4 diameter by 3/32 thick. I’m using the bottom off a peanut can, 1/128. Works great. There seems to be an attraction here…

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

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papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#7 posted 04-05-2017 05:06 AM



Yes, magnets can be machined. However, hard magnet materials are extremely difficult to machine, unlike flexible or rubber-type magnet materials. Magnets should be machined in the demagnetized state as much as possible (if possible) using diamond tools and/or soft grinding wheels, as temperature will have a negative effect on magnet strength.
Factors that can affect a magnet s strength include:
Heat
Radiation
Strong electrical currents in close proximity to the magnet
Other magnets in close proximity to the magnet
Neo magnets will corrode in high humidity environments unless they have a protective coating.

- SawduztJunky


Hammers can do a number on them too. ;-)

I would like to thank everyone for their response…except papadan. :)

- Rrrandy


:-(

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1699 posts in 1059 days


#8 posted 04-05-2017 03:28 PM

The rare-earth magnets are very brittle and the nickel plating does a lot to protect them, but I have sanded them flush with the surrounding surface to no ill effect.

As stated, heat is a killer.

A trick for getting a flush mount is to drill a hole slightly deeper than your magnet, dab some glue into the hole (epoxy), then the magnet. Next you place a flat piece of metal across the hole. The metal will grab the magnet and align it flush with the surface until the glue dries. You can then fill in any gaps with more glue for a smooth finish.
This works even better if you recess the magnet ever so slightly. The same technique is used, but you add a piece of tape to the metal that is smaller than the hole diameter. This will force the magnet slightly deeper to the hole.

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 315 days


#9 posted 04-05-2017 04:17 PM

Thanks Splintergroup, good trick.

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

314 posts in 813 days


#10 posted 04-06-2017 01:06 AM

Papadan how come threads with you and magnets dont go so well?

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papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#11 posted 04-06-2017 01:59 AM



Papadan how come threads with you and magnets dont go so well?

- corelz125


I dun no, sumpin ta do wit my magnetic pursonalty

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