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SawStop brake adjustment with each blade change?

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Forum topic by Chopshop posted 04-04-2017 03:58 PM 665 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chopshop

12 posts in 289 days


04-04-2017 03:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sawstop brake saw blade

Those of you with SawStops, do you readjust the brake each time you change your blade if it is a slightly different size? For example if adjusted for the classic WWII (which is 9-7/8”) do you readjust the brake spacing if you swap it out for say an Infinity rip or crosscut blade which are true 10” blades or do you call it close enough?


19 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2636 posts in 2008 days


#1 posted 04-04-2017 04:25 PM

I always check it. Sometimes it needs adjusted sometimes not.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

465 posts in 1478 days


#2 posted 04-04-2017 04:35 PM

I check it also. Usually it’s okay and doesn’t need adjustment with a standard blade. Obviously always have to adjust it with the dado blade.

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2891 posts in 1824 days


#3 posted 04-04-2017 04:47 PM

I adjust it if I get the flashing red light that tells me I need to. If it is not correct, you can not start the saw.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1005 posts in 1830 days


#4 posted 04-04-2017 04:51 PM

Same as redoak. I went from the stock blade to a Ridge carbide and no adjustment needed. The Dado set also goes in with no adjustment needed. The brake that goes in for the Dado set sits just right with no need to turn the yellow screw.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#5 posted 04-04-2017 04:55 PM

You have to adjust it if the blades require it.

It makes you look for true dimension blades so that you don’t have to adjust. If your blades are a true 10” and a true 8” then you will never adjust it again. My Freud blades are undersized and need the blade adjustment maxed out one direction, and my dado blade is oversized and needs to be maxed out in the other direction. I use a T-handle wrench to make it quicker to adjust.

You could probably get away without adjusting most of the time. Frankly if the saw calibrates and the light is green, you are good to go. However I always check the distance between the blade and the brake to avoid a potential false trip. Some may say that having the brake 1/32” closer to the blade stops it more quickly, but I’m not sure it makes a real-world difference.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#6 posted 04-04-2017 06:14 PM



I adjust it if I get the flashing red light that tells me I need to. If it is not correct, you can not start the saw.

- Redoak49

^^^^^what he said….

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

418 posts in 2448 days


#7 posted 04-04-2017 07:02 PM

...what THEY said…

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

965 posts in 426 days


#8 posted 04-04-2017 07:11 PM

If you do not adjust it and the gap is too far from the expected limits the saw will not start.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 831 days


#9 posted 04-04-2017 07:29 PM

I check. But also tend to go back and forth between the same two blades. So I get to know to turn the adjustment. So many turns for the given blade swap.

-- Clin

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2902 days


#10 posted 04-04-2017 07:44 PM

Its a safety device that relies on the gap. Check it!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1051 posts in 1871 days


#11 posted 04-04-2017 07:52 PM

If you have your blades sharpened, get the guy to stop taking carbide off the top of the tooth. When we first got the SS our sharpening guy had taken so much off our old blades I couldn’t adjust enough to close the gap. Had to get a bunch of new blades.
Oh well. It was time for new ones anyway. And I got to use those old blades on my saw at home…

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1787 days


#12 posted 04-04-2017 09:06 PM

There is a little wiggle room in setting the distance of the blade from the brake. Your true 10” blade and your 9 7/8” WWII blade differ in radius by 1/16”. In the SawStop manual (page 30 for my PCS) it dictates that the brake should be adjusted so that the gap to the teeth of the blade is between 1/16” and 1/8”. So….. if you install the true 10” blade and adjust the gap to 1/16” you should find that the gap is 1/8” with the WWII. No adjustments needed when changing blades. Give it a try and see if you can’t find a setting where the saw’s electronics accept both blades.

View DNK's profile

DNK

5 posts in 253 days


#13 posted 04-04-2017 10:30 PM

You do have to adjust the distance, as others have said. But I found an expensive reason.

When I changed from a WW II to a “High A/T” blade, I didn’t know those tips are at a slightly greater radius than the WW II tips. The saw went through its diagnostics and indicated ‘ready to cut’. Immediately as I turned it on, the mechanism tripped. It seems that although the tip was far enough away to satisfy the electronics, a fraction of a turn put one tip within a distance that electricity could arc (it wasn’t touching).

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1787 days


#14 posted 04-04-2017 10:38 PM



You do have to adjust the distance, as others have said. But I found an expensive reason.

When I changed from a WW II to a “High A/T” blade, I didn t know those tips are at a slightly greater radius than the WW II tips. The saw went through its diagnostics and indicated ready to cut . Immediately as I turned it on, the mechanism tripped. It seems that although the tip was far enough away to satisfy the electronics, a fraction of a turn put one tip within a distance that electricity could arc (it wasn t touching).

- DNK

Curious, for my own future protection. Did you do the customary “rotate the blade by hand” to be certain that there was no contact of any teeth with the brake? I would be very surprised that there was enough electrical potential difference between the two pieces for there to be an arc, especially since the brake is covered by an insulating layer of plastic.

View DNK's profile

DNK

5 posts in 253 days


#15 posted 04-04-2017 10:52 PM

I did rotate the blade- no contact. I bought mine in 2008, and (as far as I can tell) there’s no plastic insulation over the brake. When I called Sawstop, they gave the analysis I passed along in my post.

I guess if there’s plastic insulation now, then my experience won’t happen to anyone else.

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