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Forum topic by builtinbkyn posted 04-04-2017 03:07 PM 370 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 774 days


04-04-2017 03:07 PM

Understanding that bubinga is “oily”, would it be better to use epoxy for face grain laminating vs TB 2?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)


11 replies so far

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Chopshop

12 posts in 287 days


#1 posted 04-04-2017 03:45 PM

With one caveat, I had good luck laminating highly figured bubinga veneer to a particle board base with the original Tightbond wood glue for a dining room table that I made years ago. The table has solid bubinga edging about 5” wide, two solid bubinga cross supports, and three veneer center panels (two are about 2’x3’ and one about 3’x3’, give or take). I didn’t even have a fancy setup. I just clamped the veneer down with clamps and a top piece of particle board with 2×4 stiffeners to spread the pressure evenly.

It looked perfect for probably 15 years but has recently started to develop some crazing in the veneer. Probably with a proper veneer press, laminating it to MDF instead of particle board, and maybe not such highly figured veneer (heavy curly/quilt) it would have had an even longer life. I’m not sure epoxy would have worked out any better…and what a mess to work with.

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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 774 days


#2 posted 04-04-2017 03:57 PM

Thanks for the response. Actually I’m looking to laminate two 4/4 pieces into a block. I guess I should have been more specific.

I am curios though, in your instance, you believe it was the use of PVA glue that caused the crazing in the veneer after that many years? Could it be the particle board that’s failing or some interaction between the bonding agents in the particle board and the PVA glue that’s occurring? Or maybe even moisture infiltration in the particle board?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 774 days


#3 posted 04-04-2017 04:34 PM

Well I should have looked here as I’ve done in the past, before asking a question that’s already been addressed :) I sanded cross-grain with 120, blew it off with the compressor and wiped down with denatured alcohol. I’m using TB2 for this glue-up. Hopefully I’m gtg – fingers crossed.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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HokieKen

4504 posts in 972 days


#4 posted 04-04-2017 04:39 PM

You should be fine Bill. I have found TB2 to do fine with laminating oily tropicals as long as I use acetone or DNA to clean the faces before glue-up. Never done it with Bubinga specifically though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 774 days


#5 posted 04-04-2017 05:07 PM

Thanks Kenney. There’s a lot of surface area so I’m thinking it will be fine. Just wasn’t sure if epoxy would be better. I think the TB2 will work for what I’m doing.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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bondogaposis

4475 posts in 2184 days


#6 posted 04-04-2017 06:21 PM

TBII will work fine.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2090 days


#7 posted 04-04-2017 09:35 PM

Bill, I have made cutting boards with buginga and used TB III. There haven’t been any issues after 3-4 years.

-- Art

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johnstoneb

2633 posts in 2006 days


#8 posted 04-04-2017 10:08 PM

I’ve worked with Bubinga some and don’t find it to be that oily. Haven’t had any problems with TBII or III if you’re worried about it just wipe down with DNA before glue up.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 774 days


#9 posted 04-04-2017 10:27 PM

Thanks Art and Bruce. Lightly sanded and wiped with DNA and then used TB2. I don’t anticipate any issues:)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Chopshop

12 posts in 287 days


#10 posted 04-05-2017 04:18 AM



Thanks for the response. Actually I m looking to laminate two 4/4 pieces into a block. I guess I should have been more specific.

I am curios though, in your instance, you believe it was the use of PVA glue that caused the crazing in the veneer after that many years? Could it be the particle board that s failing or some interaction between the bonding agents in the particle board and the PVA glue that s occurring? Or maybe even moisture infiltration in the particle board?
I really don’t know what the root cause of the crazing was, other than all of my amateur processes plus maybe difficult veneer but I’m pretty happy I got 15 great years out of it with just plain TB and clamps. I made the panels removable so that I can change them out now as a new project.

- builtinbkyn


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Chopshop

12 posts in 287 days


#11 posted 04-05-2017 04:19 AM

I really don’t know what the root cause of the crazing was, other than all of my amateur processes plus maybe difficult veneer but I’m pretty happy I got 15 great years out of it with just plain TB and clamps. I made the panels removable so that I can change them out now as a new project.

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