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Miter spline question

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Forum topic by Pawky posted 10-25-2010 07:42 PM 2324 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pawky

278 posts in 2264 days


10-25-2010 07:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’ve seen plenty of projects on here demonstrating how to make the cuts in a miter joint for adding a spline and have that figured out (still have to apply it though). I am wondering what you do for getting the splines themselves? How do you get your thin piece of wood the exact size it should be for the spline? Thanks for any help


11 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#1 posted 10-25-2010 07:49 PM

I use a thin rip jig (see below) to get close, then I sand as needed to get the perfect fit.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Robb

660 posts in 3394 days


#2 posted 10-25-2010 07:56 PM

I just did a couple using a planer to get the strip to the right thickness, or close, then sanding as Charlie suggested above.

-- Robb

View Ryan's profile

Ryan

238 posts in 2390 days


#3 posted 10-25-2010 08:09 PM

I think there is no one cut solution unless you are extremely lucky like once in life time.
Use the jig to cut thin strip and trim it down to the size that fits exact.

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Pawky

278 posts in 2264 days


#4 posted 10-25-2010 08:58 PM

Excellent. Thanks guys :)

View jayman7's profile

jayman7

218 posts in 2966 days


#5 posted 10-25-2010 09:57 PM

I usually use my thickness planer to bring it pretty close, and then use sandpaper and/or hand planes to bring it to a snug fit.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#6 posted 10-25-2010 10:11 PM

I too use the thickness planer.
I have a piece of Melamine covered particle board, 1/2 inch thick that was part of one of those white closet shoe organizers from the BORG.

I joint one face of a piece, then resaw it on the bandsaw.
Then stick it to the Melamine board with double stick scotch tape.. Not the Thick carpet tape. then run it through the planer.
I haev used the thicker carpet tape and it is a pain in the butt to get off my wood (comes right off the melamine) also if i just use small pieces, the planer squishes it differently and I get variation that is annoying.

I use a tail of my caliper to see how I am doind getting to the final thickness. I used to sand that last bit…and sand… and sand… and sand, since I usually have been using tropical hardwoods for splines. I also have plenty of stock that I planed just a little too much. (keep telling myself I will cut some splines with a thinner kerf blade someday. ;-)

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Pawky's profile

Pawky

278 posts in 2264 days


#7 posted 10-25-2010 11:54 PM

Well, looks like another reason I need to get a planer at some point ;P

And thank you Dave for the detailed description about how you do it, very appreciated.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2889 days


#8 posted 10-26-2010 12:42 AM

Take a look here

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2444 days


#9 posted 10-26-2010 02:04 AM

I just use a thin strip jig as Charlie does and have a really small hand plane to fine tune the spline to fit.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View FaTToaD's profile

FaTToaD

393 posts in 2602 days


#10 posted 10-26-2010 06:28 PM

I use a lot of miter splines on my projects, everyone that sees them always comments on them. I don’t have a planer or a thing strip jig, but I’ve come up with a couple ways to make them. When I first started I used a stop block very close the the blade of my miter saw and I cut off peices of end grain. The problem with that is they have a tendencies to fall under the saw or fly out the back, plus the cutting the end grain wasn’t adding very much strength, though I use mine mainly for looks. I’ve also taken a piece of scrap wood and used it like a thin strip jig by clamping it to the table saw.

I know this is probably not the best approach I’m sure a few LJ’s are goin to yell at me for this, but lately I’ve been just ripping them with the table saw with the blad about 1/8” from the fence. I hang a towel off the shelves directly behind my saw and when the cut the strip they shoot back into the towel and fall into a box. I know, not the smartest method, but I’ve had good luck with it. I just make sure there are no people or dogs behind me, I stand way to the side, and use a ZCI. I always use some scraps of pine or poplar to get the size right before I rip the good stock. I hope this helps, just be careful.

David

-- David

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2889 days


#11 posted 10-26-2010 07:34 PM

Hey David,
Try Charlie’s method. The offcut is really your spline material and, not being trapped, won’t kick back.
I use my “V” sander to get the final fit. Usually cut 4 to 8 ft. at a time and store the excess for the next box.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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