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Forum topic by Carol posted 04-03-2017 02:33 PM 995 views 1 time favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carol

57 posts in 346 days


04-03-2017 02:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shed

hiring subs to help build my shed. once i order the doors, skylights and windows, and make sure they’ll be delivered on time, my concrete guy can set his forms

i’ll have an 8×24 shed built, with a lean-to roof. it’s built deep on the lot, and to comply with setbacks, within 2 feet of the side of the house. the low shed wall is 8’ tall, the opposite wall is 12’ tall, giving me a 6/12 slope on the roof. i’ll use sistered 2×6s in 4 spots to act as rafter ties, then wrap them in knotty pine. sliding glass doors face the river

i’m having a plumber run a water line for a sink, which is so small, it’s really only good for washing your hands, or rinsing out a coffee cup

question of the day:
since the floor is a concrete slab, save money and just paint it? spend more money to build a wood floor over it? this one’s pretty important, and i’ll need to tell my framer what it’s going to be. i have no choice about the base; can’t put in a block foundation, and the local building inspector says if i use piers, i’ll need an engineer’s stamp…gotta love building inspectors :/

-- Carol


27 replies so far

View phathead's profile

phathead

8 posts in 284 days


#1 posted 04-03-2017 02:43 PM

I did my basement in 2 part epoxy and if you prep corectly the stuff is very tough. The only thing that seems to stain it is stain. Paint, motor oil, etc comes right up. Another choice would be the snap together tiles used in some auto shops/garages seems to pretty popular.

View NDakota's profile

NDakota

72 posts in 1379 days


#2 posted 04-04-2017 04:34 AM

You could check out if anyone grinds and polishes concrete near you. They can do some great stuff with polished concrete and stain! If you go that route slab only has to be flat and not finished very well.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#3 posted 04-04-2017 12:31 PM

I’d put a floating floor in. 200 square feet of a pergo type product at about a dollar a square foot won’t put you out much and it’ll be more comfortable than painted concrete, especially when you put the foam underlayment down first. But I would order an out swinging door so you can leave your options open.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2830 days


#4 posted 04-04-2017 01:25 PM

”$34.00 / cases
12mm Wintour Maple Classic Laminate Flooring (17.26 sq. ft. ...
Home Decorators Collection
Model # 7L12X165/8045CL
Store SKU 1001002632”

Home Depot sells these.
A 2ft x 1” vinyl type laminate floor tile made for damp locations.
I have installed three of these in past year.
1bathroom
1 unheated porch
1 Kitchen- living room
They install easily
They look really good
They are easy to clean
It may work for you ?

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Carol's profile

Carol

57 posts in 346 days


#5 posted 04-04-2017 02:00 PM

canadianchips, wow that sounds great. do you have any photos? what subfloor were you working with? why kind of underlayment did you use? any moisture issues so far?

-- Carol

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#6 posted 04-04-2017 09:04 PM

He suggested what I suggested – just go to the flooring section of the home center and find something you like. Some products are made from mdf with a plastic veneer, some are basically plastic all the way through. They will have the underlayment necessary for the brand of flooring you pick. Some flooring has it’s own underlayment actually attached to the laminate plank itself. The underlayment cushions, makes up for unevenness and creates a vapor barrier and will come in a roll that goes down fast. Most of the flooring snaps together and meed need a mallet tap to get things tight. The packages are small and you could make a trip or two in a car to get all you would need.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2830 days


#7 posted 04-05-2017 02:42 AM

Hi Carol. The product I used….they didnt recommend underlayment. I put mine on wooden subfloor. I will get some pictures this week. I never think of photos after I finish a job, I should.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2777 days


#8 posted 04-05-2017 03:32 AM

One more consideration: Horse mats. I’m, slowly, covering my floor in one inch thick rubber horse mats. What a HUGE difference at the end of the day. As most know, walking on concrete all day takes a toll.

The mats run $40.00 for a 4’x 6’ mat. That’s $1.66 a square foot.

Drop a chisel on the mats and it’s just a matter of picking it up and going back to work. Similarly, nice tools have a better chance of survival when dropped.

I have about seven so far and plan on buying about eight to ten more so I can even have them under equipment wheels (a one inch jump is a bit much for a band saw with a riser, or my carving machine).

View Carol's profile

Carol

57 posts in 346 days


#9 posted 04-05-2017 12:14 PM

i’ve laid 3 rooms of LVT over a wood subfloor using the underlay the manufacture recommended, but have no experience with a slab. traditional laminate isn’t a good choice since everyone plays in water and sand all day.
the horse mats are an unusual idea, i’ll look them up. did they have any residual odor?
home centers near me offer the most choices of traditional mdf laminates, and the least expensive runs 1.99/st ft. that’s nearly $500 just to cover the concrete (more than my roofer wants to install architectural shingles!).

-- Carol

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#10 posted 04-05-2017 12:55 PM

You never said what the purpose of the building was – yoga studio, potting shed, pool house, wood shop, pottery – so how are we to know? You can get 12×12 ceramic tiles for a dollar each and put them in a mortar bed. The concrete guy would leave the slab roughly keyed for adhesion. It’s all personal choice.

I put laminate flooring in my attic, about 700 square feet and the planking was all plastic, looked great and was only 69 cents a square foot, plus underlayment.

View Carol's profile

Carol

57 posts in 346 days


#11 posted 04-05-2017 01:23 PM

this is a she-shed or guesthouse (i put that in the title, but should have mentioned it again) for overflow visitors. since local building code says you can’t live in an outbuilding, we just refer to it as the shed :)
love the ceramic tile idea! hadn’t even thought about that…

when i hear “laminate” i don’t think solid vinyl, i think layers of materials laminated together, normally with a very thin wood layer on the top.

my main concern with laying a floor over concrete is moisture. i’ve read you shouldn’t even paint or coat it before it’s fully dried (30 days? 60 days?). anyone know if the dry time is affected by it being indoors?

wish i could find flooring for 69 cents/foot! i’m building this in a small town; there’s 1 building supply place within 20 miles. the next one is 45 miles away but its a big box store so that’s helpful. anything else, like my doors and skylights, i have to buy local and bring down. we live about 70 miles away from where i’m building the “shed”.

-- Carol

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2777 days


#12 posted 04-05-2017 03:09 PM

In answer to the question, I have not noticed any odor from the mats, but I’ve only put down three at a time.

For sealing concrete, manufacturers of sealers recommend around sixty days, if memory serves. As such, I’d wait at least that long. Just for reference, one article talks about concrete taking as long as twenty or thirty years to dry fully.

On the subject of sealing, I’m come to the conclusion it’s a VERY good idea. It can stop staining. Outside, it keeps water out. In areas where freezing occurs, that’s a very good idea, to keep concrete from cracking.

Back to the mats, if this is more of a play/guest house than a shop get away, they probably aren’t a good choice, since they aren’t all about pretty.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#13 posted 04-06-2017 12:25 PM

About a month seems to be the rule.

https://www.tcnatile.com/faqs/27-tile-over-concrete.html

There is no real wood veneer in those products, the wood look is actuall printed on just like fake wood paneling from the 1970s. What about mail ordering? This place gives free samples.

https://www.builddirect.com/results/laminate-flooring?uid=67018ea5baa3d41026aa300b0bb5d262&kwid=13547433&adid=31480024640&s_kwcid=AL!4652!3!167651342051!p!!g!!laminate%20flooring&gclid=CLGDpfroj9MCFURDhgod6NYFDg&ef_id=Vth0qgAAAe24swYt:20170406122217:s

View JayCee123's profile

JayCee123

196 posts in 598 days


#14 posted 04-07-2017 02:00 AM

Please, double check with your local Building Department about the need for a continuous footing around the structures perimeter. The local Authority having jurisdiction, may consider this a “One Story Detached Accessory Structure,” and although it may have a foot print less than the cut-off (256 sq. ft. in some locales), which gives you the ability to forego the requirement for a continuous footing, the eave height is in excess of 10 ft., this might force you back into the requirement to have a haunch or continuous footing. Please, get a clarification and a written exemption if someone “says” differently. concrete work is expensive to demo and do again.
Have your foundation contractor indicate the thickness of the proposed slab, the concrete strength, the steel reinforcement he will be providing. Rebar or welded wire mesh. The size and spacing? The contractor should tell you how he intends to develop the sub-surface prior to concrete pour. He should be removing organics (topsoil), compact the remaining soil, provide a gravel bed, compact again, lay a plastic vapor barrier. How will he secure the framed structure to the slab? Usually embedded anchor bolts. This information should be agreed to prior to the pour. All of this info should be documented on a drawing. I’m not absolutely sure what your local authority requires in the form of documentation, thats something you need to discuss with your local inspector.
The concrete slab and sub-surface prep are one of the most important considerations you face. The way this slab performs will directly affect the finish you choose, whether its an applied coating or a laid wood or laminate floor.
Also question your Contractor regarding frost-proofing of the proposed waterline. What is the frost depth in your area? How does he propose to protect that line once it travels above the frostline? This sounds as if its an uninsulated and unheated structure, things to consider when running a water line. This will also affect the performance of the flooring if you decide on wood or laminate flooring. How do you accommodate the drains. The Inspector will allow you to just pipe it out the side of the structure? That sounds very odd and would be costly to resolve should an inspector tell you otherwise … get it in writing so that doesn’t cost you later.

View Carol's profile

Carol

57 posts in 346 days


#15 posted 04-07-2017 02:43 AM

all good points to consider. as luck would have it, i was the GC for the house next to this proposed shed. so even though i dont have experience with building directly on a slab, i DO have some small building experience :-)

i worked extensively with the county building inspectors when i built the house, and i’m very fortunate that i have expert and reliable subs that i trust. my concrete guy has been laying slabs in this area for over 30 years, same with my framing sub.

in this area, because this shed is over 144 sq ft, it must be built to code. that makes everything pretty straightforward.

-- Carol

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