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Forum topic by Big_Al13 posted 10-25-2010 12:50 PM 3573 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Big_Al13

7 posts in 2235 days


10-25-2010 12:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw question

Hi all,
first post on this site..be easy on me!!

I figured what better way to get answers than to ask people who do woodworking!

We are in the process of cleaning my grandparents garage out and my grandfather has a Craftsman table saw, a drill press and what I believe is a lathe with disc sander…these tools from what I can remember probably havent been used in 20yrs being that i’m 33 its as far back as I can remember so it may even be longer.
I know the saw has a 3/4hp motor and from the outside looks in very good condition I would imagine the belt would have to be replaced from sitting so long, the drill press and lathe I have not checked into as they are surrounded by stuff and havent gotten to them..
The saw does have table rust and would require attention but a minor concern for me. I am tempted to start the saw but want to now if there are any concerns about starting it after so many years of not running, anything i should do before i start it?
I have checked into finding literature on it but with very limited success…
I know this post does not have much info as in model numbers etc..I will get them again and post and hopefully get some pictures as well

Any help is greatly appreciated!!

-- Big_Al ~ Some say I'm anal... I'm not anal, I just pay attention to detail!


9 replies so far

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Big_Al13

7 posts in 2235 days


#1 posted 10-26-2010 07:23 PM

Ok i took a few pictures hopefully this works, first time uploading to site
craftsman model # 113.242820
motor #113.12260
anyonewith info..its appreciated or where even to start. Also i dont have a manual and searched online for one but no luck
http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j385/aswoyer13/saw3.jpg
http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j385/aswoyer13/saw2.jpg
http://i1083.photobucket.com/albums/j385/aswoyer13/saw1.jpg

-- Big_Al ~ Some say I'm anal... I'm not anal, I just pay attention to detail!

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Tim_456

170 posts in 3060 days


#2 posted 10-26-2010 08:19 PM

Welcome!
I”m not expert, but I would try to move everything manually first to see if there’s anything that’s locked up or corroded to the point of breaking. That would be my first “triage” step to see how bad the saw really is. This would include spinning the motor manually, then moving the arbor, the blade height, then the bevel.

Given the age and appeance I would then remove the top and take a look under it. View all the working parts to see if anything’s ready to give way and if it needs to be replaced. You don’t want something cutting loose and getting tossed by the spinning blade of death.

Assuming everythings ok, I would clean and lube everything and then start the task of getting the blade to spin. Which I would do first with no blade attached but get the motor and arbor turning and check the threads on the arbor.

Then with the blade operational I’d start to tackle that rusted top and the fence system, with the final steps being the alignment of the top and fence to the blade which is a whole topic in itself.

If the saw has sentimental value or you’re into reconditioning saws then this looks like a good project. From the looks of the top alone however, I’d seriously think about buying something used on CL if you’re serious about woodworking. I would not envy someone the task of cleaning that table top.

Good luck!

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KTMM (Krunkthemadman)

1051 posts in 2658 days


#3 posted 10-27-2010 06:41 AM

I’m doing a rebuild on an old 50’s model craftsman saw. If the numbers on your saw start with 113. then it was made by Emerson, the same as mine. Searspartsdirect.com keeps a good picture of the breakdown of the saw along with parts list. With my saw it was running when I got it, but I decided it would be a great idea to replace the arbor and motor bearings. The thing runs like a top now. Check out my blog, and the pictures here.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

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Big_Al13

7 posts in 2235 days


#4 posted 10-27-2010 11:58 AM

Thanks for the help so far…checked out Searspartsdirect.com found the breakdown..a huge help..I plan on starting this soon, hopefully next week. Just have to make a space and get it to my house…
KTMM about how many hours have you put into it? it looks great!!

He has 3 other tools in the garage, but I’m only supposed to take one not sure why since the rest of the family wont even use them and they will just sit and not be used. I thought he had a lathe but after moving somethings around he has a drill press pretty big, stands atleast 5’ its in a corner and I couldnt move it around to get the model#, a radial arm saw…out of the 2 any preference to which someone would want in their shop?

-- Big_Al ~ Some say I'm anal... I'm not anal, I just pay attention to detail!

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IrreverentJack

724 posts in 2308 days


#5 posted 10-27-2010 01:00 PM

Big Al. Check out the Old Wood Working Machines websites, owwm.com and owwm.org . Your saw looks like this one . Good luck. -Jack

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Big_Al13

7 posts in 2235 days


#6 posted 10-27-2010 01:37 PM

is there a certain way to look up a model number? i have googled it and inserted the number in a few sites but for some reason find nothing like you guys have so far…

I greatly appreciate the help!!
Thanks

-- Big_Al ~ Some say I'm anal... I'm not anal, I just pay attention to detail!

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 2308 days


#7 posted 10-27-2010 10:41 PM

I’d check the model number again Big Al. You might have an extra digit. If it’s 113.24280 You’ll find a lot of stuff out there. -Jack

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BTKS

1984 posts in 2929 days


#8 posted 10-28-2010 05:41 PM

Big_Al13,
Don’t be concerned about posting here, it just shows you are smart enough to ask a question. As for the resources to start working with the guys above have pointed you in the right direction. Especially the part about manually turning everything and the order to troubleshoot.
Of the three tools, the tablesaw is the centerpiece of a woodworking shop. It will do almost everything with the proper setup. I have a radial arm saw similar to the one in the background of the photo. It has set unused for over a decade. It’s not even mounted to a table anymore. I plan on setting it back up to do some dadoes and maybe some overhead routing if the high speed arbors on the right side workout okay. Sorry, got off the point. The TABLESAW!!!!
Tim456 had some good points about the sentimental value. If that’s the case, go for it. There are some good links for electrolysis. I would be careful about using it on cast iron. I know it works great for removing rust from steel, I’m sure it will stop with just the rust on cast.

The fence is usable and capable of making good cuts. It is woefully behind the times in comparison to today’s rip fences. Careful tuning of the fence and real tight alignment of the rails is crucial for that fence to perform well.
Best of luck, hope it works out well.
BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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Big_Al13

7 posts in 2235 days


#9 posted 11-08-2010 12:55 PM

UPDATE..well I got the saw home last week and have started to take it apart…everything turned well by hand to my surprise. A lil WD40 here and there helped to… I have taken some pics and will get them up asap

-- Big_Al ~ Some say I'm anal... I'm not anal, I just pay attention to detail!

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